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Here is the complete text of The Library of Formatting Examples. You can search it with your Browser, and when you find what you need, you can use the link above what you found to display the actual example.
The Changelog for the Library is HERE.

Updated: 10/30/2020 12:41:00 PM



01 Italics 101-00A                 Updated  2011/06/17

well-informed persons who adhere to correct
speech.

A <i>shaft</i> is a truly vertical mine passage
[*** simple markup: a word mid-sentence.]

[*** ********************  INTRODUCTION  *********************]
[*** We begin with Italics because it is the most common kind ]
[*** of formatting we find in most projects. The reasons why  ]
[*** we format italics as we do also apply to the other       ]
[*** in-line formatting markups that we use.                  ]
[***                                                          ]
[*** Many formatting decisions involve whether to place       ]
[*** punctuation (especially periods) INSIDE or OUTSIDE the   ]
[*** in-line markups, so most of these commented examples     ]
[*** will focus on the proper placement of punctuation.       ]
[***                                                          ]
[*** TIP: You can make these examples larger or smaller by    ]
[***      ZOOMING with your Browser. Also, in most Browsers,  ]
[***      pressing F11 will toggle full-screen mode to let    ]
[***      you see more of the taller examples.                ]
[*** *********************************************************]



01 Italics 101-00B                 Updated  2011/04/22

[*** Throughout these examples, we will use the term "complete sentence" to refer to any]
[*** stand-alone, independent clause, even if it doesn't contain both a subject and a predicate.]
[*** This complete sentence is in italics, so its period goes INSIDE the markup tags.]

2. <i>Gross interest must be distinguished from net interest.</i>
The forms of wealth yielding incomes are so mutable, and
are used under such complicated conditions, that both in



01 Italics 101-01A                 Updated  2011/04/22

Operations, if planned to be conducted
for a long term of years and therefore
warranting the installation of large and
expensive plants, should be based upon
the holding of extensive ore-bearing
ground. Here enters the notion of the
<i>shape and size of a mining property</i>.
[*** Only part of the sentence is italicized, so the period goes OUTSIDE the markups.]
[*** Why: We only place punctuation within in-line markups when the punctuation belongs to]
[*** what needs to be marked. This period belongs to the entire sentence, not just to the]
[*** part that is in italics.]



01 Italics 101-02A                 Updated  2011/04/18

irregularities of the dip of such body. It
is neither horizontal nor vertical. Such
an inclined passage following a seam of
coal is known as a <i>slope</i>.
[*** the period belongs to the sentence, not to the italicized word,]
[*** so the period goes OUTSIDE the markups]



01 Italics 101-02B                 Updated  2011/03/02

follow, nor parallel, bodies of value. The
miner's term for such an opening is <i>rock
slope</i>.[*** one markup even though it spans lines]



01 Italics 101-02C                 Updated  2011/04/06

[*** watch for non-italicized words between italicized ones]
An <i>adit</i> or <i>mining tunnel</i> is a horizontal
opening driven from the surface. If it be
driven along an ore body, as a vein, it is
[*** semi-colon is a separator and goes OUTSIDE]
properly called a <i>vein adit</i>; if it is driven
<i>across</i> barren country to intercept pre-*



01 Italics 101-03A                 Updated  2011/04/18

<i>Opposition to the Constitution.</i>--As soon as the text of
the Constitution was made known to the people of the
[*** These examples use the term "complete sentence" to identify self-contained phrases]
[*** as well as what we normally think of as "sentences." So, above we have a]
[*** "complete sentence" and its period goes INSIDE.  The em-dash is a separator.]
[*** It is not part of either sentence and it goes OUTSIDE the markups.]



01 Italics 101-04A                 Updated  2011/03/03

[*** TWO complete sentences. BOTH periods go INSIDE.]
<b>The Senate.</b>--<i>Purposes.</i>--Regarding the desirability of
creating a national legislature of two houses there was little
difference of opinion among the members of the convention.



01 Italics 101-05A                 Updated  2011/04/12

be maintained without material fluctuations,
if the greatest economy is to be
attained. Exploitation, <i>i.e.</i>, development
[*** periods INSIDE: they're part of the abbreviation.]
[*** comma OUTSIDE: it's not part of the abbreviation.]



01 Italics 101-06A                 Updated  2011/04/18

three sides, it is considered correct to
describe the contents as <i>ore partly blocked</i>;[*** semi-colon goes OUTSIDE]
for such bodies as are proved upon two
[*** Below, a simple in-line list. Mark each "item" in the list separately.]
[*** The comma and the 'or' are not items in list, and go OUTSIDE the markups]
sides only, the terms <i>ore faces</i>, <i>ore developing</i>
or <i>probable ore</i> are appropriate; while
in speaking of all ore that may be expected
or suspected, but which is beyond the last
exposures, we may use the expressions
<i>ore expectant</i> and <i>possible ore</i>.
[*** it's easy to miss the upright word in the middle]



01 Italics 101-07A                 Updated  2011/04/18

furnished by an impostor. <i>In no sort of
a mining proposition is a reliable report
so essential as when one is contemplating
the purchase of a "prospect."</i> Successful
engineers, whose predictions concerning
[*** The entire sentence is italicized, so its period goes INSIDE the markup tags.]
[*** What makes this unusual are the quotation marks around the final word.  If the]
[*** entire italicized sentence had been in quotation marks, the quotation marks would]
[*** go OUTSIDE the italics markups. However, these quotation marks are part of what is]
[*** italicized, so they go INSIDE.]



01 Italics 101-08A                 Updated  2011/03/18

with her house and furniture--drawn a great harrow over
her garden--poisoned Boxer--eaten her clothes-pegs--fried
her cabbages--fricaseed (how is it spelt?) her
radishes--ragout'd her Onions--belaboured her <i>beat</i>-root--outstripped
her scarlet-runners--parlez-vous'd with her   [*** above: hyphen OUTSIDE]



01 Italics 101-08B                 Updated  2011/03/02

[*** it's hard to spot words that are only partly italicized]
decanters--put old Phillips to pickle in the brine-tub--dis<i>organ</i>ised
her piano--dislocated her candlesticks--emptied
her wine-bins in a fit of despair--turned out her



01 Italics 101-09A                 Updated  2015/04/17

[*** When entire paragraphs are italicized, the Guidelines    ]
[*** require us to tag each one separately. This also applies ]
[*** to the other inline tags: boldface, small-caps, font     ]
[*** change, and gesperrt.                                    ]

<i>For ten years the Greeks had besieged Troy, and on the
tenth they took and utterly destroyed that ancient city. The
inhabitants who had escaped captivity and the sword, wandered
in exile to many quarters of the earth. Now the chief
band of exiles was led by Æneas, son of Venus and Anchises,
and son-in-law of Priam, king of Troy.</i>

<i>After many adventures on land and sea, Æneas came, in
the sixth year, to Sicily, where he was kindly entertained by
Acestes, king of that land, and where his aged father died
and was buried. Thence setting sail in the summer of the
seventh year, he approached the shores of Africa. Here a
violent storm arose which scattered and all but destroyed the
Trojan ships. Æneas, with a number of his companions,
was cast upon a desert coast, where they passed the night
in gloomy forebodings. In the early morning, Æneas and
Achates set forth to explore the land, and came to the newly
founded city of Carthage.</i>

<i>Now Ph[oe]nician Dido, also, with a band of exiles, had fled
from her native Tyre, to escape the persecutions of her brother,
Pygmalion, who had already slain Sychæus, her husband.
And to the land of Africa had she come, and built her a city,
even the city of Carthage.</i>

<i>And so these two, Æneas, prince of Troy, and Dido, fugitive
from Tyre, now meet in distant Africa and live the
tragedy which fate has held in store.</i>
[*** ix: paragraphs in italics;pages of italics]



01 Italics 101-10A                 Updated  2013/03/05

There was something I could
do--should do--but my mind refused
to focus. It bogged down in
a muck of unreasoning terror and
could only scream <i>Why? Why?
Why?</i>
[*** Here, the question marks belong to the words, not to the declarative sentence that]
[*** contains them, and this isn't a list, so one markup pair for all.]



01 Italics 101-12A                 Updated  2011/03/02

poet, the son of G[r.]itsamadas, and also an epithet applied
to the <i>flatus ventris</i>, which is compared to a clap of
thunder (Cfr. the roots <i>kar</i>, <i>kur</i>, <i>gar</i>, <i>gur</i>). In the
[*** That's an in-line list: mark each term separately.]



01 Italics 101-12B                 Updated  2011/07/28

/*
"Jam dederat Salii (a saltu nomina ducunt)
  Armaque et ad certos verba canenda modos."

--<i>Fasti</i>, iii. 389.
[*** Em-dash and comma both go OUTSIDE the markups.]
[*** The attribution is right-justified and on a separate line. In this example, it's enclosed]
[*** in the same no-wrap tags as the quotation.  Some Project Managers prefer it to be in a   ]
[*** separate no-wrap, to make it easier to handle the right-justification.]
*/



01 Italics 101-13A                 Updated  2011/04/18

"Here they all are," said the minister, pointing to an upper
shelf on which stood about sixty volumes. "The seven books
on which the Spirit of God has shed its brightest light are:
<i>The Delights of Wisdom in Conjugal Love</i>; <i>Heaven and
Hell</i>; <i>the Apocalypse Explained</i>; <i>An Exposition of the Inward
Sense</i>; <i>On the Divine Love</i>; <i>The True Christian Religion</i>;
<i>The Angelic Wisdom of the Omnipotence, Omniscience,
and Omnipresence of those who share the Eternity
and Immensity of God</i>.
[*** That in-line list uses semi-colons instead of commas. Note that the commas in the]
[*** last title are part of the title, and must be included within the markups.]



01 Italics 101-14A                 Updated  2011/04/28

"Not at all," said the Vicar; "not at all.
Only----. Naturally it may be inconvenient if
you tell a too incredible story. If I might suggest
(<i>ahem</i>)----."
[*** Parentheses are containers. Their contents may be in italics or boldface, but the   ]
[*** containers are not, and they go OUTSIDE the markups. (You don't actually drink      ]
[*** a can of soda: you drink the soda that's in the can.)  EXCEPTION: when any kind of  ]
[*** punctuation, including parentheses, is in the middle of something that's meant      ]
[*** to be entirely in italics (or boldface, etc.), the punctuation should remain within ]
[*** the overall markups. If the preceding sentence had been in italics, the parentheses ]
[*** would be italicized along with the rest.                                            ]



01 Italics 101-14B                 Updated  2011/03/19

Sunday--it might have been different. But
that's too late now.... (<i>Bother!</i>) Nobody,
[*** Exclamation mark INSIDE, parentheses OUTSIDE.]
absolutely nobody, will believe in you."



01 Italics 101-15A                 Updated  2011/04/18

of <i>Biogenesis</i>,[1] than some of those who with equal
vehemence proclaim the doctrine of Evolution for
[*** The footnote reference is not part of the name. Also, we never italicize]
[*** footnote references. (Well, hardly ever; there's an exception later on.)]



01 Italics 101-16A                 Updated  2011/04/12

[*** A "complete sentence", so period goes INSIDE. Em-dash goes OUTSIDE.]
science.--<i>Philosophy of Mind.</i> These three parts of the system
represent the three elements of the absolute method, thesis, antithesis,
synthesis. The absolute is at first pure, and immaterial



01 Italics 101-16B                 Updated  2011/04/30

art-conceptions; (2) to critically sift them (<i>i. e.</i> to exclude every
thing but pure thought); and (3)--which is the most characteristic
peculiarity of the Hegelian logic--to derive these dialectically
from one another, and carry them out to an internally connected
system of pure reason. Hegel starts with the view, that
in every conception of the reason, every other is contained <i>impli-*</i>
[*** This page ends with an italicized word and a hyphen, so a continuation asterisk is ]
[*** needed. Doing it as shown here (everything INSIDE the markups) works properly with ]
[*** the GuiGuts Post-Processing tool, while other methods do not. Since some PP'ers    ]
[*** don't use GG, you may want to ask for a preference in the Project Discussion.      ]
[*** ALSO: on the top of the next page (which is not in this Library), placing the      ]
[*** continuation asterisk INSIDE the italics works properly with GG:  <i>*cite</i>     ]
[*** (the book spelled the full word as "implicite").                                   ]



01 Italics 101-17A                 Updated  2011/04/12

[*** "i. e." and "it exists" are italicized for different reasons:]
[*** "i. e." is italicized because it is a Latin abbreviation, while]
[*** "it exists" is italicized for emphasis. Mark them separately.]
<i>form</i>. Every essence is a unity of content and form, <i>i. e.</i> <i>it exists</i>.
In distinction from immediate being, we call that being which has



01 Italics 101-17B                 Updated  2011/04/12

Both of these, the inner and the outer, are also identical; neither
is without the other. That, <i>e. g.</i> which the man is internally in
[*** The period is an integral part of the abbreviation and goes INSIDE,]
[*** even if the abbreviation is at the end of an "upright" sentence.]
respect of his character, is he also externally in his action. The
truth of this relation will be, therefore, the identity of inner and



01 Italics 101-17C                 Updated  2011/04/12

outer, of essence and phenomenon, viz.:

[*** The number is not the topic and is not italicized.]
[*** The topic is a "complete sentence", so the period goes INSIDE the markups.]
[*** The em-dash goes OUTSIDE.]
(3.) <i>Actuality.</i>--Actuality must be added as a <i>third</i> to being
and existence. In the actuality, the phenomenon is a complete
and adequate manifestation of the essence. The true actuality



01 Italics 101-18A                 Updated  2011/03/02

[Footnote 3: The <i>Chicago Tribune</i> and the <i>Record-Herald</i> effectively exposed the
affair. <i>Cf.</i> <i>Colliers Weekly</i>, May 4, 1907, for a good résumé.]
[*** "Cf." is an abbreviation, so period goes INSIDE. It's italicized]
[*** because Latin often is. "Colliers Weekly" is italicized because it's]
[*** the name of a magazine. Different reasons, so mark them separately.]



01 Italics 101-19A                 Updated  2011/04/18

(right of the diagram)
the left subclavian, <i>s'c'</i>
[*** Prime-symbols, part of the identifications in the (not shown here) illustration,]
[*** so they go INSIDE the markups.]
(the right subclavian,



01 Italics 101-20A                 Updated  2013/12/04

press" do not mind lying a little upon a pinch. [See Walter's
"Times" of Tuesday last, for the following: "<i>Mr. Cobbett
has thrown open the front of his house at Kensington, where he
proposes to sell meat at a reduced price.</i>"] What I said was this:
[*** The quotation marks are containers and go OUTSIDE the markups. But, where does that   ]
[*** period go? The quotation is a complete sentence within another sentence, and there's  ]
[*** only one period, so it belongs to the "inner" sentence (the one in italics), so the   ]
[*** period goes INSIDE the markups.                                                       ]

[*** This "ownership" notion also applies when the last word of a non-italicized sentence  ]
[*** is an italicized abbreviation such as "etc." In that situation, the period, which     ]
[*** belongs to the abbreviation, must stay with it, and go INSIDE the tags.               ]



01 Italics 101-20B                 Updated  2011/03/02

which have overtaken me on my way, that the system is working
the Agriculturasses in "the sister-kingdom" too! The following
[*** It's easy to mistakenly mark the following as 5 words in italics.]
paragraph will show that the <i>remedy</i> of a <i>bad harvest</i> has not done
our dear sister much good. "A very numerous meeting of the
Kildare Farming Society met at Naas on the 24th inst., the
Duke of Leinster in the Chair; Robert de la Touche, Esq.,



01 Italics 101-20C                 Updated  2011/04/30

contains. At Salisbury (only about 20 miles off) fat hogs sell for
5<i>s.</i> to 4<i>s.</i> 6<i>d.</i> a score. But, then, observe, these are <i>dairy hogs</i>,
[*** shillings and pence: mark the abbreviations, including the periods,]
[*** but NOT the numbers.  (This is different from italicized dates.)]
[*** (l., s., and d. are abbreviations for the Latin words libra, solidus, and denarius.)]



01 Italics 101-20D                 Updated  2011/05/01

further towards the West. Some wheat has been sold at Newbury-market
for 6<i>l.</i> a load (40 bushels); that is, at 3<i>s.</i> a bushel.
[*** These are abbreviations, so if they are italicized in the image, their periods must be]
[*** included within the markups.  However, when an £ looks slanted (see next example),]
[*** it's just stylized, NOT italicized, and should not be marked.]



01 Italics 101-20E                 Updated  2011/05/01

that is exactly what I wished, and especially your having
engaged to pay him the 800 sestertia (about £6,400), which
I am determined shall be paid in any case, even if I have
[*** The "£" looks slanted in the image, but that's just because it's a stylized]
[*** currency symbol.  It isn't in italics and should not be marked.]



01 Italics 101-21A                 Updated  2011/10/05

<i>of the country</i>, than the necessity in which the Society finds
itself of <i>discontinuing its premiums, from its present want of
funds</i>. The best members of the farming classes have got so
[*** On the first line, the comma is not part of what is emphasized, so it goes OUTSIDE]
[*** the markup. On the second and third lines, the comma is part of what is emphasized,]
[*** and is included in the markup. And the Proofers properly removed the archaic]
[*** quotation marks.]



01 Italics 101-21B                 Updated  2011/04/18

been ruined by the South Sea Bubble! I cannot help feeling
for these people, for whom my birth, education, taste, and habits
give me so strong a partiality. Who can help feeling for their
wives and children, hurled down headlong from affluence to
misery in the space of a few months! Become all of a sudden
the mockery of those whom they compelled, perhaps, to cringe
before them! If the Labourers exult, one cannot say that it is
unnatural. If <i>Reason</i> have her fair sway, I am exempted from
all pain upon this occasion. I have done my best to prevent
these calamities. Those farmers who have attended to me are
safe while the storm rages. My endeavours to stop the evil in
time cost me the earnings of twenty long years! I did not
sink, no, nor <i>bend</i>, beneath the heavy and reiterated blows of the
accursed system, which I have dealt back blow for blow; and,
blessed be God, I now see it <i>reel</i>! It is staggering about like a
[*** Many of the sentences on this page end with an exclamation mark, so this one "probably"]
[*** belongs to the sentence, too. Placing the "bang" OUTSIDE is more likely to conform to]
[*** Guidelines, and if you think it may be an exception but are not sure, ASK.]



01 Italics 101-22A                 Updated  2011/04/12

[*** When upright numerals, especially dates, are part of italicized]
[*** phrases, we enclose them in the same italics markups.]
[*** Reason: the printer probably didn't have italics numerals.]
[*** BUT, when the numerals are associated with an abbreviation]
[*** such as "3s." (where the "s." for "shillings" is italicized),]
[*** or "A. M." that is in small-caps, or a word like "circa"]
[*** that is italicized because it's from another language,]
[*** we do NOT enclose the numerals in the markups.]
[*** Also, both of these lines can be enclosed in the same markup.]
/*
<i>Old Hall,
Saturday night, Nov. 10.</i>
*/

Went to Hereford this morning. It was market-day. My
arrival became known, and, I am sure, I cannot tell how. A
sort of <i>buz</i> got about. I could perceive here, as I always have



01 Italics 101-23A                 Updated  2011/04/18

bottle like that shepherd's boy; and, in an instant, it hurried
me along through my no very short life of adventure, of toil,
of peril, of pleasure, of ardent friendship and not less ardent
enmity; and after filling me with wonder, that a heart and mind
so wrapped up in everything belonging to the gardens, the
fields and the woods, should have been condemned to waste
themselves away amidst the stench, the noise, and the strife of
cities, it brought me <i>to the present moment</i>, and sent my mind
back to what I have yet to perform about Nicholas Grimshaw
and his <i>ditches</i>!
[*** This is ambiguous: did the author use the exclamation mark to emphasize the entire]
[*** sentence, the ending phrase, or just the word "ditches"? Unless it's clear that the]
[*** "bang" goes with the word, put it OUTSIDE the markups. (And, this is from the same]
[*** book as an earlier example, where many sentences ended with exclamation marks.)]



01 Italics 101-23B                 Updated  2011/04/12

[*** "eighty" and "I wish I" seem to be emphasized for different]
[*** reasons, so they are marked separately. (Judgement call?)]
[*** They are NOT marked separately because of the intervening]
[*** period, and there will be cases where a single italics]
[*** "phrase" begins in the middle of one sentence and ends]
[*** in the middle of another sentence, with the period inside.]
[*** This is not one of those cases, and this period falls outside.]
in your frame, if you go upright and do your work well. This
old man never knew how to do it well, and he stoops, and he
hangs his scythe wrong; but, with all this, it must be a surprising
man to mow short-grass, as well as he does, at <i>eighty</i>. <i>I
wish I</i> may be able to mow short-grass at eighty! That's all
I have to say of the matter. I am just setting off for the source



01 Italics 101-23C                 Updated  2016/01/11

the frontier. The prince furnishes all those who join the insurgents
<i>without authorisation, but he sends one-fifth of his effective forces into
the Herzegovina. Not to overtire these poor people, His Highness
takes care to change them at the end of each expedition, or when
their provisions are exhausted. Reforms alone, it is stated, will
never put an end to the insurrection, and force is of no avail so
long as the insurgents and their Montenegrin friends have only to
cross the frontier to be in safety.</i>"[1]
[*** All periods go inside the italics tags. Even though part of the first ]
[*** sentence is not in italics, leave the first period inside the italics ]
[*** markup because the entire passage in italics is being emphasized.     ]

[Footnote 1: <i>Turkey</i>, 3, 1876, No. 1.]



01 Italics 101-24A                 Updated  2011/04/17

[*** Each italicized term is a "complete sentence", so their periods go INSIDE.]
[*** The em-dashes go OUTSIDE. In the second paragraph, parentheses go OUTSIDE:]
[*** only their contents is italicized ... even if they'd been printed in italics.]
<i>Gramme-Molecule.</i>--A gramme-molecule is the molecular
weight of a body expressed in grammes. Occasionally
for brevity a gramme-molecule is spoken of as a "molecule."
Thus we may say that the molecular weight of oxygen is
16 grammes, meaning thereby that there are the same
number of molecules in 16 grammes of oxygen as there are
atoms in 1 gramme of hydrogen.

<i>Concentration.</i>--The concentration of a solution is the
ratio between the quantity of the solute and the quantity of
the solvent. The concentration of a solution is expressed
in various ways. (<i>a</i>) The weight of solute dissolved in
100 grammes of the solvent. (<i>b</i>) The weight of solute
present in 100 grammes of the solution. (<i>c</i>) The weight
of solute dissolved in a litre of the solvent. (<i>d</i>) The weight of
solute in a litre of the solution. The most usual method is to



01 Italics 101-25A                 Updated  2011/03/03

York. Mr. Monett instituted a series of descriptive and illustrative
announcements developing the <i>Mohawk Valley</i>,
[*** The quotation marks go OUTSIDE on the next 2 lines.]
through which the New York Central runs, as being "<i>the
really most beautiful</i>" route, passing through the scenery
of the romantic valley of the Mohawk and the mountain
[*** But below, the quotation marks go INSIDE, because they are]
[*** there to emphasize a term, rather than as an actual]
[*** quotation. Also, placing them OUTSIDE would require closing]
[*** and re-opening the italics, when the author obviously]
[*** intended to emphasize the entire phrase.]
heights of the Hudson with all the advantages of <i>"a water-*level
line" following the coursings of the Mohawk and
Hudson Rivers</i>, and so giving a perfect night's rest.



01 Italics 101-26A                 Updated  2011/06/01

[*** This sentence is declarative; the quotation is interrogative.]
[*** The question mark is part of the quotation and goes INSIDE the tags.]
On hearing our request, Mr. Tarte called in his Chief,
asked if it could be done, being assured that it could added
"<i>Can you go to Kingston to-night and arrange for it?</i>"
The next morning work was begun in the dock so that the



01 Italics 101-27A                 Updated  2018/02/20

being with which it is identical, is not a <i>unum per se</i> but only a
<i>unum per accidens</i> (<i>cf.</i> <i>b</i>, <i>infra</i>).
[*** There are four separate elements on that bottom line: mark them separately. ]
[*** "cf." is an abbreviation, so its period must be marked with it;             ]
[*** the comma after "b" is a separator and goes OUTSIDE any markups;            ]
[*** the parentheses are not part of any of those elements,                      ]
[*** and should not be within any of the italics markups.                        ]



01 Italics 101-28A                 Updated  2011/04/17

responding with <i>Ô</i> ("Yes" or "Amen") at the end of every
paragraph. It is as follows:--

/#
[*** 1. Use Block Quote because of blank space above quotation,]
[***    and italicize each paragraph separately.]
[*** 2. This quotation is in italics, and continues for several]
[***    pages. The double quotation marks form a container for]
[***    that quotation, but are not part of what they contain,]
[***    so they go OUTSIDE the italics markups. However, the]
[***    single quotation marks are part of the overall quotation,]
[***    so they stay inside the markups.]
[*** 3. "We never italicize footnote references."  Well,]
[***    ALMOST never. Here, it just doesn't make sense to close]
[***    and reopen paragraph-length markups just because of a]
[***    footnote reference. But, you may want to leave a note.]
[***    (This example doesn't show the actual footnote.)]
"<i>He[A] says: 'Hearken all ye assembled Kannushi and
Hafuri.'</i>

"<i>He says: 'I humbly declare in the presence of the Sovran
Gods, whose praises are fulfilled as Heavenly Deities and as
Earthly Deities, by command of the Sovran, dear, divine
ancestor and ancestress who divinely dwell in the Plain of
High-Heaven.</i>

"<i>'In the second month of this year the Sovran Grandchild
is graciously pleased to pray for harvest, and I, therefore, as
the morning sun rises in glory, offer up his plenteous offerings,
thus fulfilling your praise.' [Here the Kannushi and Hafuri
of the shrines concerned remove this set of offerings.]</i>
#/



01 Italics 101-29A                 Updated  2011/04/18

*tractor with government for cleansing the sea bedding. It is
composed of a centre piece <i>A</i>, strongly fixed to a post in the
ground, the bars <i>A B</i> <i>A C</i> being suspended above it, so as to
remain horizontally moveable, while describing 1/4 of a revo-*
[*** "A B" and "A C" are two objects. Should they be marked separately or be in one pair]
[*** of markups? In Plain Text, separate markups will give more accurate emphasis:]
[*** ... the bars _A B_ _A C_ being ...  In HTML, both ways will look the same.]



01 Italics 101-30A                 Updated  2011/02/27




BOOKS IN THE "FAIRY SERIES"


[*** A simple list. Enclosed in no-wrap.]
[*** Mark each italicized entry separately.]
/*
<i>The English Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Welsh Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Irish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Scottish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Italian Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Hungarian Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Indian Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Spanish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Danish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Norwegian Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Jewish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Swedish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Chinese Fairy Book</i>
*/



01 Italics 101-31A                 Updated  2011/04/21

Although in every case I have told the tale in my own words, I am
indebted for the originals to Campbell's "Popular Tales of the Western
Highlands," Leyden's Poems, Hogg's Poems, Scott's "Border Minstrelsy,"
Chambers' "Popular Rhymes of Scotland," "The Folklore
Journal," etc.

[*** Signature is right-justified, so enclose it in no-wrap. It's a "complete sentence,"]
[*** so period goes INSIDE. Location/date should remain on 2 lines, so enclose them in]
[*** no-wrap to preserve that intention. In this situation, it's OK to put everything in]
[*** one pair of no-wraps. Location/date is one sentence (there's a comma), so a single]
[*** italics markup pair is sufficient, and the period goes INSIDE. We include the]
[*** numerals in the italics. (Printers generally didn't have italics numerals.)]
/*
<sc>Elizabeth W. Grierson.</sc>

<i>Whitchesters, Hawick, N.B.,
12th April, 1910.</i>
*/



01 Italics 101-32A                 Updated  2011/04/05

[Footnote A: In his <i>MS. Dictionary</i> is the following entry:

"<sc>Poder</sc>: <i>vtziniçabal</i>, vel <i>vtzintaçibal</i>; deste nombre usa la <i>Cartilla</i> en el Credo
para decir por obra vel poder del Spirito Santo. Al poder que tienen los Sacerdotes
de perdonar pecados y dar sacramentos, se llaman, o an llamado, <i>puz</i>, <i>naual</i>[** 2 terms or 1 phrase?].]
[*** when unsure, leave a note, ask in the Project Discussion, or return the page]



01 Italics 101-33A                 Updated  2011/04/18

"It is six feet square, and four feet high; and the
top is divided into thirty-six tablets [or squares] of
<i>hieroglyphics</i>, which beyond doubt <i>record some</i> <sc>EVENT</sc>
<i>in the history</i> of the mysterious people who once inhabited
the city."
[*** There are different ways to format 'EVENT', and preferences vary by Post-Processor,]
[*** so always ask in the Project Discussion. This example is in the Italics Category]
[*** because it is the presence of a small-caps term WITHIN an italics phrase that raises]
[*** the question of what should be done.]



01 Italics 101-35A                 Updated  2011/04/18

[*** For purposes of formatting, even a single word can be a "complete sentence" if it is]
[*** used as a stand-alone term. Period goes INSIDE.]

<i>Limitations.</i>--In recent years, however, mainly on account
of the popular distrust in which our legislatures have
come to be held, numerous limitations upon their powers



01 Italics 101-36A                 Updated  2011/04/18

[*** This is NOT a list.  It's the name of the book, so the commas both go INSIDE.]
[*** However, the ending period belongs to the sentence, and goes OUTSIDE.]

In July, 1820, appeared the volume <i>Lamia, Isabella, The Eve
of St. Agnes and other Poems</i>. The lingering influence of Hunt
is seen in a fondness for the short poetic tale, in the direct



01 Italics 101-36B                 Updated  2011/04/12

[*** "Ibid." is an abbreviation. Period goes INSIDE the markups.]
[*** The commas go OUTSIDE. Italicized abbreviations are common in footnotes,]
[*** and because they're printed in a smaller font, often are harder to find.]
[*** So, treat footnotes like contracts, and "carefully read the fine print."]
[*** (Quickly scanning for breaks in the pattern just won't work with fine print.)]
[*** And, while on the subject of Footnotes, they often contain stealth]
[*** small-cap Roman Numerals (this example does not). Equally often, they]
[*** contain lower-case Roman Numerals that should not be marked, but it can be]
[*** very hard to tell the difference.]
[Footnote 102: <i>Ibid.</i>, Bk. IV, l. 863 ff.]

[Footnote 103: <i>Ibid.</i>, Bk. II, l. 756 ff.]



01 Italics 101-37A                 Updated  2011/04/18




THE PROGRESS OF BALLOONS

[*** Proofing Guidelines tell us to retain quotation marks on each line of poetry.]
[*** This quotation is from a Metrical Play by Seneca, so that Guideline applies.]
[*** Quotation marks go OUTSIDE the markups, so italics must close/re-open on each]
[*** line. Punctuation is part of the poem, so it goes INSIDE markups. If there were no]
[*** quotation marks, the entire poem would be in one set of markups, but the]
[*** attribution still would need its own markup, with the em-dash OUTSIDE.]
[*** Attribution can go in same no-wrap as poem, and should be left-justified.]
[*** Also, that horizontal rule above the title is decorative, not a thought break.]
/*
"<i>Perdomita tellus, tumida cesserunt freta,</i>
"<i>Inferna nostros regna sensere impetus;</i>
"<i>Immune c[oe]lum est, degnus Alcidæ labor,</i>
"<i>In alta mundi spatia sublimes feremur.</i>"
 
--<i>Senec. Herc. Furens.</i>
*/


/*[*** This is from a book of poetry.]
  Assist me, ye muses, (whose harps are in tune)
To tell of the flight of the gallant balloon!
*/



01 Italics 101-38A                 Updated  2011/05/10

/#
"With the rest of his (Hunt's) young people I have no acquaintance,
except through some things of theirs (which have been sent out without
my desire), and I confess that till I had read them I was not aware of
the full extent of human absurdity. Like Garrick's 'Ode to Shakespeare,'
<i>they 'defy criticism.'</i>[** 1 markup or 2?] These are of the personages who decry Pope....
[*** A difficult structure to format. This approach keeps the emphasized text together.]
[*** Originally, it was done as:  <i>they</i> '<i>defy criticism</i>.']
[*** because that conforms to Guidelines.  After several experts reviewed it, the single]
[*** markup made more sense, as did leaving a [**note] for the Post-Processor.]
#/



01 Italics 101-39A                 Updated  2011/04/12

sudden overthrow, seem to me never to have been clearly correlated by
the historians. Solon's law (1) ordained that where an actual [Greek: stasis]
had arisen, every citizen must take some side, calculating that all
[*** We do not mark Greek transliterations as italics or boldface.]



01 Italics 101-42A                 Updated  2013/05/20

the table. All eyes were fixed on him. "<i>Well, Miss Eliza</i>,"
said he, addressing the elegant Miss E. Sitgreaves, "<i>can
you set these little dogs a dancing?</i>" "<i>No indeed, I can't</i>,"
replied she. "<i>Well</i>," replied he, "<i>if I had such a pair of
eyes as you have, I think I could do it.</i>" She blushed. "<i>However,
let us see</i>,"  continued he, "<i>if we can't do something.</i>"

[*** This example involves some "judgement calls."                                                ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** These sentences use italicized dialog, with the speakers identified in upright text.         ]
[*** The first one ("Well, Miss Eliza,") is a question, and the "?" obviously goes with it,       ]
[*** INSIDE the markup.  The second one ("No indeed, I can't,") is straightforward. However....   ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** The third and fourth ones ("Well, ... I think I could do it." and "However, let us see,...") ]
[*** are italicized, but contain upright text. So, where should their periods go?                 ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** The Guidelines section on "Placement of Inline Formatting Markup" says, "Place punctuation   ]
[*** outside the tags unless the markup is around an entire sentence or paragraph, or the         ]
[*** punctuation is itself part of the phrase, title, or abbreviation that you are marking."      ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** One interpretation is that the markup is not around an entire sentence, so the period should ]
[*** go outside the markups.  Another interpretation is that the entire sentence IS italicized,   ]
[*** and the upright text is just a descriptor inserted in the middle, so the period should go    ]
[*** INSIDE (as shown here).                                                                      ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** Suggestion: if this occurs just a couple of times in a project, leave a note, regardless of  ]
[*** how you format it.  If it occurs frequently (there were hundreds of them in this Project),   ]
[*** ASK about it in the Project Discussion.  (You can include a recommendation, with an          ]
[*** explanation of why you prefer to do it one way or the other. If you receive an authoritative ]
[*** answer, follow it; if not, you've called attention to the situation and documented it.)      ]



01 Italics 101-43A                 Updated  2011/06/25

severe strain upon their endurance, but we assigned four
hunting units, twelve boats in all, to the task, and also
added to this contingent the destroyers <i>Wilkes</i> and <i>Parker</i>.
On the morning of September 2nd one of these subchaser
units picked up a suspicious sound. A little later the lookout
on the <i>Parker</i> detected on the surface an object that
looked like a conning-tower, with an upright just forward
which seemed to be a mast and sail; as it was the favourite
trick of the <i>U-53</i> to disguise itself in this way, it seemed
certain that the chasers were now on the track of this
[*** This is a wonderful example of why we need to recognize situations in which numbers would  ]
[*** have been in italics if the printer had had them. This is from a Naval history. The names  ]
[*** of ships (and boats) always are in italics, but only the "U" of the submarine's name is in ]
[*** italics. Obviously, it was the author's intention to italicize the entire name "U-53", but ]
[*** the printer didn't have such type. We do, so we mark it that way.                          ]
[***                                                                                            ]
[*** The most common example of this situation occurs in the "date" heading of letters, which is]
[*** the very first example of in-line formatting in the Guidelines:                            ]
[*** "<i>Enacted 4 July, 1776</i>"]



01 Italics 101-44A                 Updated  2011/06/25

[*** These footnotes demonstrate the criteria for placing periods INSIDE or OUTSIDE the markups. ]
[*** #1 is straightforward: a mixed sentence (upright and italics), so the period goes OUTSIDE.  ]
[*** #2 is also a mixed sentence: "Stanhope" is upright, the colon is a separator, and only the  ]
[***    name of the book is in italics, so the period goes OUTSIDE.                              ]
[*** #3 is a completely italicized "sentence" containing only the name of the book, so the period]
[***    goes INSIDE the tags.                                                                    ]
[*** #4 is like #2, with the period OUTSIDE.  However, the comma is part of the title, so it goes]
[***    INSIDE the single pair of tags.                                                          ]
[***                                                                                             ]
[*** And, for purposes of determining sentence structure, the Footnote tag itself, which includes]
[*** the number and colon, is not part of the text, so its colon has nothing to do with whether  ]
[*** or not "Jerningham Letters." in the third Footnote is a complete sentence.  It is.          ]

[Footnote 1: A contemporary account, quoted in <i>George III, his Court
and Family</i>.]

[Footnote 2: Stanhope: <i>Life of Pitt</i>.]

[Footnote 3: <i>Jerningham Letters.</i>]

[Footnote 4: Galt: <i>George III, his Court and Family</i>.]



01 Italics 101-45A                 Updated  2012/10/11

[Footnote 2: Letter to Rutty, <i>Chronol. Hist.</i> 1770, p. 117.]

[Footnote 3: <i>Gent. Magaz.</i> Oct. 1751, and July, 1755, p. 343.]

[*** When a book, magazine, or article's title is italicized and followed by an upright   ]
[*** date, and we know that printers at that time generally did not use italics numerals, ]
[*** should the date be included in the italics tags?  The general answer is: it depends  ]
[*** on whether it's part of the title of the publication (U. S. Census, 1860) or is the  ]
[*** publication or issue date (The Atlantic, October, 1860). If it's part of the title,  ]
[*** it should be included INSIDE the tags; if it's a publication or issue date, then     ]
[*** it's not part of the title and should be OUTSIDE the tags ... unless, of course,     ]
[*** it's italicized in the image.                                                        ]
[***                                                                                      ]
[*** In footnote 3, both dates are issue dates, so neither should be in italics.          ]
[*** Footnote 2 is more interesting, as the date could be used in either way.  In these   ]
[*** cases, leave a [**note] to alert the Post-Processor about the ambiguity, or, if you  ]
[*** have the time & interest, do some research (not required; the note is sufficient).   ]
[*** A Google search on "Rutty Chronological History 1770" reveals that the book covers   ]
[*** 40 years of meteorological records and was published in 1770, so the date is not     ]
[*** part of the title, and goes OUTSIDE the tags.  (You still may want to leave a note.) ]



01 Italics 101-46A                 Updated  2013/05/20




{23} CHAP. III

/#
<i>Departure from Philadelphia to the Western Country.--Communications
by land in the United States.--Arrival
at Lancaster.--Description of the town and its environs.--Departure.--Columbia.--Passage
from Susquehannah,
York, Dover, Carlisle.--Arrival at Shippensburgh.--Remarks
upon the state of agriculture during
the journey.</i>
#/


The states of Kentucky, Tennessea[**P2 Tennessee?], and Ohio comprise
that vast extent of country known in America by the
name of the Western Country. Almost all the Europeans
who have published observations upon the United States,
[*** New chapter, so precede with four blank lines and leave two blank lines between the chapter  ]
[*** headings and the body.                                                                       ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** To avoid conflict with normal footnote anchors, the Project Comments asked the proofers to   ]
[*** enclose internal references such as [23] in curly braces {23}.                               ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** The chapter summary is in the form of a hanging indent, so enclose it in block quotes to let ]
[*** the post-processor know it needs special handling.                                           ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** The summary is in italics, so enclose all of it in just one pair of italics tags: it isn't   ]
[*** a normal in-line list, so don't tag each item separately with the em-dashes outside the      ]
[*** italics; let everything be inside the one set of tags.                                       ]



01 Italics 101-47A                 Updated  2013/12/05

and when the revolution of February broke out we saw them, as
I have said, disposed to make three stipulations:--

/*
<i>1st</i>, Continuance of wages;
<i>2d</i>, Participation in profits;
<i>3d</i>, Immunity from losses.
*/

It may be said, perhaps, that these stipulations were neither so
unjust nor so impossible as they appeared, seeing that they are
[*** The three stipulations are printed as a list, so enclose them in no-wraps. ]
[*** The numbers are printed as ordinals (with suffixes) and those suffixes are ]
[*** italicized. This implies that, had the numbers been printed as words, they ]
[*** would be italicized, so we include the digits in the italics tags. As      ]
[*** mentioned elsewhere, printers did not necessarily have italicized numbers  ]
[*** available.                                                                 ]

[*** This "2d" is quite different from "2d." (2 pence) in British currency.     ]
[*** The "d" here is part of the word "second", while the currency "d" is an    ]
[*** abbreviation for a separate word, "denarius," the Roman penny.             ]
[*** As shown in the first example under "Placement of Inline Formatting" in    ]
[*** the Formatting Guidelines, when the currency "d." is italicized, the       ]
[*** number next to it is not italicized. The "2d" on this page is more like    ]
[*** the numbers in the first and seventh lines of that list of examples.       ]



01 Italics 101-48A                 Updated  2014/06/26

/#

<b>En-</b>, <i>in</i>: energy, emblem, emphasis, empiric, encomium, encyclic, endo-gen.

<b>Epi-</b>, <i>upon</i>, <i>to</i>: epidemic, epigram, epistle, epitaph, ep-hemeral, ep-och.

<b>Eu-</b>, <i>well</i>: eucharist, eulogy, euphemism, euphony, ev-angel = good news.

<b>Exo-</b>, <i>outside</i>, <i>without</i>: exo-gen, exoteric, exotic.

<b>Hemi-</b>, <i>half</i>: hemicycle, hemisphere, hemi-stich.

<b>Hyper-</b>, <i>over</i>, <i>beyond measure</i>: hyperbole, hypercritical, hypertrophy.

<b>Hypo-</b>, <i>under</i>: hypocrite, hypodermic, hypothesis, hyp-hen (= one).

<b>Meta-</b>, <i>after</i>, <i>between</i>, (<i>changed for</i>): metaphor, metathesis, metamorphosis,
metonymy, met-hod = after a way (hodos).

<b>Para-</b>, <i>beside</i>, <i>near by</i>, <i>contrary to</i>: parable, paradox, parallel, parish,
parody, par-helion.

<b>Peri-</b>, <i>around</i>, <i>near</i>: period, perimeter, perigee (g[=e] = earth), perihelion.

<b>Pro-</b>, <i>before</i>, <i>for</i>: problem, prologue, prophet = interpreter.

<b>Syn-</b>, <i>with</i>, <i>together</i>: synagogue, syntax, syl-lable, sym-pathy, sy-stem.
#/
[*** This is a list, but some of the entries need more than one line, so enclose it in Block Quotes.  The list began on a ]
[*** previous page, so leave a blank line before the first item to separate it from the last item on the previous page.   ]
[*** Also separate each entry with a blank line so they won't be rewrapped as a single paragraph during post-processing.  ]
[*** Each item in the list contains its own list of words or phrases, and each of those should be tagged separately.  The ]
[*** commas, colons and parentheses are separators and containers, not parts of what's being emphasized, so they should   ]
[*** not be included in the italics or bold tags, even though they are slanted. However, the hyphens in the boldface      ]
[*** prefixes are considered to be part of those prefixes, so they go inside the boldface tags.                           ]



01 Italics 101-49A                 Updated  2014/12/19

T. Garnett's <i>Observations, &c.</i>, i. 244, 265.
[*** The title of Garnett's book is italicized.     ]
[*** The "&c." represents part of a deliberately    ]
[*** shortened title, so it belongs within the same ]
[*** pair of italics tags as "Observations", and so ]
[*** does the comma.                                ]
[***                                                ]
[*** (This was in a footnote, the rest of which has ]
[*** been omitted for simplification.)              ]



01 Italics 101-50A                 Updated  2016/06/25

The plural number, and the genitive singular, seem to have been
originally formed by adding <i>er</i> to the nominative singular, as <i>you, you-er,
your</i>; <i>they, they-er, their</i>; <i>we, we-er, our</i>. This termination was afterwards
changed into <i>en</i>, and then into <i>es</i> or <i>s</i>. Thus we have still in provincial
usage, though now almost entirely obsolete, <i>childer</i> for the plural
of <i>child</i>, and the double plural in <i>child-er-en, children</i>, with the double
genitive in <i>west-er-en, western</i>.
[*** These are unusual inline lists: the author seems to be emphasizing groups of variants, ]
[*** rather than individual words, so we enclosed each group, rather than each word, in a   ]
[*** single set of italics tags. The group delimiters are semi-colons, not commas.          ]
[***                                                                                        ]
[*** When you see unusual situations, it's always a good idea to ASK about them in the      ]
[*** Project Discussion, and perhaps to leave a [** note].                                  ]



01 Italics 101-51A                 Updated  2019/01/03

humble? To abhor themselves in dust and ashes,
in the presence of God their Saviour? To be
deeply and steadily serious, feeling their wants,
and <i>passing the time of their sojourning with fear</i>?
Truly meek and gentle, never <i>overcome of evil</i>,
<i>but overcoming evil with good</i>? Throughly athirst
for God, and continually panting after a renewal
in his likeness? How thinly are they scattered
[*** These sentences are rhetorical questions; the italics are ]
[*** just for emphasis, and are not questions, so the question ]
[*** marks belong to the overall sentences and go OUTSIDE the  ]
[*** italics tags.                                             ]



01 Italics 101-52A                 Updated  2020/10/13

"'Ere's a rummy picnic. We left camp,
as it were, by the front door. 'E <i>'as</i> given [*** The apostrophe represents ]
us a giddy-go-round, an' no mistake," said         [*** an omitted part of the    ]
a dripping private as he dismounted behind         [*** word, so include it in    ]
the infantry lines.                                [*** the inline tag.           ]



01 Italics 101-53A                 Updated  2020/10/13

you're provided for for life. <i>An'</i> further--don't [*** This apostrophe      ]
tilt her that way!--you 'old your                       [*** indicates an omitted ]
neighbours, friends and employers in the                [*** part of the word, so ]
'ollow of your 'and."                                   [*** include it in the tag]

"How do you mean?" said William, intent
on his egg.

"Everything which a man <i>is</i> depends
on what 'e puts inside 'im," was the reply.
"A good cook's a King of men--besides
being thunderin' well off if 'e don't drink.
It's the only sure business in the whole round
world; and <i>I</i>'ve been round it eight times, [*** This apostrophe is part of ]
in the Mercantile Marine, before I married        [*** a normal contraction, and  ]
the second Mrs. M."                               [*** only the "I" is in italics ]



02 Small_Caps 102-00A                 Updated  2013/02/15




INTRODUCTION[*** This is all upper-case; do not mark it.]

[*** This sub-heading is in Mixed small-caps.]
<sc>The Sources for the Study of Early Roman History</sc>


The student beginning the study of Roman History through the
medium of the works of modern writers cannot fail to note wide
differences in the treatment accorded by them to the early centuries

[*** SMALL-CAPS OVERVIEW:                                                                       ]
[*** Two kinds of text should be marked as small-caps:                                          ]
[***   1. mixed small-caps, as we see in the sub-heading above;                                 ]
[***   2. in-line all small-caps, which we will see in later examples.                          ]
[***                                                                                            ]
[*** We do NOT mark all-full-height upper-case as small-caps, and "mixed small-caps" means it   ]
[*** contains at least one letter in each Case. So, there is no such thing as all-lower-case    ]
[*** small-caps at DP, and a sub-heading that seems to be in all-lower-case small-caps actually ]
[*** is in plain all-upper-case (and should NOT be marked); think of it as being in             ]
[*** "heading case," even though there's no such formal designation.                            ]
[***                                                                                            ]
[*** If the Case of proofed text doesn't match the Image, formatters should change it. So, make ]
[*** sure that small-cap "A.M." is formatted as <sc>A.M.</sc>, ***NOT*** as <sc>a.m.</sc>.      ]
[***                                                                                            ]
[*** Many books use ordinary "A.M." or "a.m." and those should not be marked at all; just leave ]
[*** them in their original Case. (Replicate the spacing "A. M." or lack thereof "A.M.")        ]
[***                                                                                            ]
[*** Finally, the punctuation rules for formatting in-line italics also apply to small-caps.    ]



02 Small_Caps 102-00B                 Updated  2011/07/12

They may be compared to the early monastic chronicles of the
Middle Ages. Writing was practised in Rome as early as the sixth
century <sc>B. C.</sc> and there can be no doubt that the names of consuls
or their substitutes were recorded from the early years of the republic,
although the form of the record is unknown. It is in the annals

[*** The letters in "B. C." look like capital letters, but they are about the height of  ]
[*** the surrounding normal lower-case letters, and are shorter than the capital letters ]
[*** in "Middle Ages;" that's why they're called "small caps." The small-caps in this    ]
[*** example are one size, so they're not "mixed small-caps" and must be formatted as    ]
[*** all upper-case (as shown), and enclosed in small-caps markup tags. If the book uses ]
[*** actual all upper- or all lower-case, do not mark it.                                ]



02 Small_Caps 102-01A                 Updated  2011/04/15




CHAPTER IV

THE STATE LEGISLATURE[*** All upper-case. Do not mark.]


[*** "Complete sentence," so period goes INSIDE the markups.]
<b>Powers of the State Legislatures.</b>--The powers of the
state legislature, unlike those of the city council and those



02 Small_Caps 102-02A                 Updated  2011/07/28




CHAPTER II

[*** We mark Mixed-small-caps.]
<sc>Tools and Appliances</sc>

[*** We do NOT mark all-upper-case headings or sub-headings, even when the letters look ]
[*** like all-lower-case small-caps.  Headings are wrappable unless you use no-wrap or  ]
[*** add blank lines. Here, the chapter ID, name, and sub-heading are separated by blank]
[*** lines, but since the sub-heading clearly is wrappable, it wasn't placed in no-wrap.]
TOOL LISTS AND COSTS--LAYING OUT AND MARKING
OFF THE WORK--SHOP APPLIANCES


[*** And when the first words in a chapter or section are in small caps, we just change]
[*** them to normal mixed-case and do not mark them.]
In this chapter the names and approximate costs
of the tools and appliances are given and also suggestions
as to fitting up the shop for working with



02 Small_Caps 102-03A                 Updated  2011/04/15

[Illustration: A WALRUS HERD.]
[*** Just all upper-case. Not small-caps, not bold.]



02 Small_Caps 102-04A                 Updated  2011/04/18

/*
Saturday, Jan. 10, 1835.
*/

[*** Mixed small-caps: mark it. Not a complete sentence; comma goes OUTSIDE.]
[*** A colon also would go OUTSIDE.]
<sc>My Lord Duke</sc>,--Finding my peace, that perfect
peace which for so many years I have almost uninterruptedly
enjoyed interfered with by your visits,--*



02 Small_Caps 102-05A                 Updated  2011/04/21

*strelsy," Chambers' "Popular Rhymes of Scotland," "The Folklore
Journal," etc.

[*** Signature is right-justified, so enclose it in no-wrap.]
[*** It's in mixed small-caps and is a "complete sentence," so the period goes INSIDE.]
[*** Location/date must remain on separate lines, so enclose both lines in one pair of]
[*** no-wraps. Location/date is one sentence (there's a comma), so a single italics]
[*** markup pair is sufficient. We include the numerals in the italics.]
/*
<sc>Elizabeth W. Grierson.</sc>

<i>Whitchesters, Hawick, N.B.,
12th April, 1910.</i>
*/



02 Small_Caps 102-06A                 Updated  2011/04/18

[*** How should this small-caps text be formatted? Most of the Post-Processors who]
[*** discussed it prefer using two pairs of small-caps tags, as shown below: one for the]
[*** entire date and the other for "A. M."  WHY: if everything to the left of the em-dash]
[*** is in one pair of markups, the HTML version of "A. M." will become actual upper-case]
[*** instead of "squat" small-caps. Marking them separately avoids this, and lets us use]
[*** the normal upper-case "A. M." Alternatively, using one pair of tags and lower-case]
[*** "a. m." will give the desired result in HTML, but that's not how we format]
[*** small-caps "A. M." and when possible, we strive for consistency.]
[*** (Both ways work equally well for Plain Text.)]

<sc>Wednesday, July 20</sc>, <sc>A. M.</sc>--Begins calm with
thick fogs. 5.30 a. m., fog cleared off, went ahead full
speed. Jam of ice to the N. E., steamed more to the
westward following the leads northward, light breeze
from E. N. E. 6.30 a. m., fine open water, making
[*** this book does NOT use small-caps for am/pm within the text]
straight course. 10.45 a.m., very heavy sheets, having to
steam around them from N. W. to east, but making good



02 Small_Caps 102-07A                 Updated  2011/04/06

visits which under present circumstances I cannot feel
justified in receiving, as they are of so different a
nature from those I anticipated when I gave you permission
to call upon me,--I think it my <sc>DUTY</sc> to
[*** All small-caps within a sentence.]
entreat they should cease.



02 Small_Caps 102-07B                 Updated  2011/04/12

all the world are as nothing in comparison with you,--I
consider it equally my duty to <i>add</i> that however
dear <sc>God</sc> may have made you to me--(and I feel it
[*** Mixed small-caps. (From same page as previous example.)]
is His Work, Why or Wherefore time must explain)
<i>you</i> are as nothing in comparison with CHRIST,
[***                         All upper-case, not small-caps.]
Whose honor I consider concerned, being, I glory
to say His openly acknowledged, however unworthy,



02 Small_Caps 102-08A                 Updated  2016/06/18

[*** The possessive 's may go INSIDE or OUTSIDE the markup, depending on how it's been printed ]
[*** in the original book and possible instructions in the Project Comments/Discussion.        ]
[*** If the style isn't clear, it's easier to include it within the small-caps tags.           ]

<b>Documentary and Illustrative Material.</b>--1. <sc>Thorpe's</sc> Constitutions
and Organic Laws, or <sc>Poore's</sc> Charters and Constitutions, both
published by the Government Printing Office. 2. Pamphlet copies



02 Small_Caps 102-09A                 Updated  2011/04/12

Is not this the first of all questions
which a Clerical Council has to answer
in open terms?

/*
Ever affectionately yours,[*** comma, so this is a 2-line "sentence,"]
<sc>J. Ruskin</sc>.       [*** so the period goes OUTSIDE.]
*/



02 Small_Caps 102-10A                 Updated  2011/04/20

blessing upon the worship of his ally, though opposed
to his own, for in his letter he writes:

/#
"<sc>Blessed be the Lord God of Israel</sc>,"
[*** The quotation marks are containers. Their contents is in small-caps; they are not.]
[*** This is not a complete sentence, so the comma, which is a separator, goes OUTSIDE.]
[*** The Blessing itself often appears in both prose and verse, but on this page, it's]
[*** quoted from a letter in which it was wrappable.]
#/

and that his actions should be in keeping with his
words, he forthwith entered into a Treaty to build the
first Temple to the ever-living and the only <sc>God</sc> at
Jerusalem.



02 Small_Caps 102-11A                 Updated  2016/04/16




CHAPTER  II.

[*** 1) Mixed Small-caps in sub-headings/summaries are common. If you receive this kind of    ]
[***    text as all upper-case, change it to mixed case as well as marking it.                ]
[*** 2) TIP: Using the "Abc" Case-change button avoids the risk of making a typo, but that    ]
[***    button does not always handle capitalization correctly: sometimes, it capitalizes a   ]
[***    letter that should be in lower-case. So, after using the "Abc" button, it's           ]
[***    absolutely necessary to check the result to make sure each of the letters is in the   ]
[***    same Case as what appears in the Image.                                               ]
[*** 3) The heading is printed as a hanging indent (2nd and 3rd lines indented), so we        ]
[***    enclose it in Block Quotes to call it to the attention of the Post Processor.         ]
/#
<sc>Crossing the Gulf of St. Lawrence.--Our First Ice.--An
Abandoned Boat.--In the Midst of the Floe.--Newfoundland
Fishermen.--Off for Cape Desolation.</sc>
#/


We left Sydney at 8.30 <sc>P.M.</sc>, June 12th, the night
being clear and the water smooth. The ship
[*** 4) We normally don't Small-cap the first words in a chapter. If they are in all-caps,    ]
[***    we change them to normal upper/lower-case, unless the project has other instructions. ]
[*** 5) "P.M." (and "A.M.", "B.C.", and "A.D.") often are printed in small caps, as shown     ]
[***    above. They are abbreviations, and the associated times/dates should NOT be included  ]
[***    in the small-caps markups. They are like the Formatting Guidelines example of British ]
[***    currency abbreviations: "It cost 9<i>l.</i> 4<i>s.</i> 1<i>d.</i>", NOT like the      ]
[***    "<i>Enacted 4 July, 1776</i>" example.                                                ]



02 Small_Caps 102-12A                 Updated  2013/04/07

"It is six feet square, and four feet high; and the
top is divided into thirty-six tablets [or squares] of
<i>hieroglyphics</i>, which beyond doubt <i>record some</i> <sc>EVENT</sc>
<i>in the history</i> of the mysterious people who once inhabited
the city."
[*** This example shows how to format 'nested' in-line markups: "EVENT" is in all-uppercase ]
[*** small-caps, within an italicized phrase. Unless the Project Comments or Discussion ask ]
[*** for a different method, tag it as shown here: close the italics, mark "EVENT" as       ]
[*** small-caps and make sure it's all-uppercase, then re-open the italics.                 ]



02 Small_Caps 102-13A                 Updated  2011/06/25

famous ports of antiquity, the town from which Augustus
and Antony, in 42 <sc>B.C.</sc>, started on the expedition which,
[*** When the abbreviations "B.C.", "A.D.", "A.M.", and "P.M." are in small caps, we mark them]
[*** that way, always in all upper-case.  We do NOT include the year or time in the markups: they]
[*** are like the Guidelines' example of abbreviated British currency symbols:]
[*** "It cost 9<i>l.</i> 4<i>s.</i> 1<i>d.</i>", and NOT like the example of an italicized date]
[*** in the heading of a letter: "<i>Enacted 4 July, 1776</i>".]



02 Small_Caps 102-14A                 Updated  2016/02/29




CHAPTER III.

HOW G, B AND K COMPANIES WENT TO SOUTH FRAMINGHAM.


While the naval militiamen of Springfield were being
sent off to their places of duty amid the
cheers of the people plans for the mobilization of
the land forces of the state were going on apace.
The call of President McKinley for troops was issued on
April 23 and six days later on April 29, Col. Embury P.
Clark of the Second Regiment of Infantry, M. V. M., was
[*** Treat an illustrated drop-cap or a regular drop-cap ]
[*** like a plain, capitalized letter. Don't indicate it ]
[*** with an [Illustration] tag, and make sure the first ]
[*** word in the body of a chapter is in normal          ]
[*** mixed-case, not in small-caps or all-caps.          ]
[***                                                     ]
[*** Unless the project comments request other ways of   ]
[*** formatting illustrated letters, just follow the     ]
[*** guidelines, as explained here.                      ]



02 Small_Caps 102-15A                 Updated  2014/10/17

as they do also in the lizard. The second pair become on
the right side (left of
the diagram) the aortic
arch, on the left side
(right of the diagram)
the left subclavian, <i>s'c'</i>
(the right subclavian,
<i>sc</i>, is a branch of the
aortic arch). The third
pair become carotids,
<i>cc</i>, while the fourth and
fifth, as already said, are
aborted. In the mammal
(Fig. 43), on the left
side (right of the diagram)
the first arch becomes
the pulmonary
artery, <i>p</i>. In the f[oe]tus the continuation of this arch
forms the ductus arteriosus, which is afterward obliterated,
as shown in the dotted line. The second arch becomes
the aortic arch, the third the left exterior carotid.
On the right side (left of the diagram) the first arch
becomes aborted; the second, the right subclavian, <i>sc</i>
(the <i>left</i> subclavian, <i>s'c'</i>, is a branch of the aortic arch);
and the third, the right carotid. Nos. 4 and 5, on both
sides, as usual, are aborted.

[Illustration: <sc>Fig. 43.</sc>--Modified for mammal.]
[*** Move illustrations to a paragraph break, if there is one.  ]
[*** This page has a paragraph break at the bottom, and that's  ]
[*** a valid location for an illustration (if there's a         ]
[*** paragraph break there).                                    ]
[***                                                            ]
[*** Include the number and period in the small-caps. The       ]
[*** illustration's identification is "Fig. 43.", NOT "Fig."    ]
[***                                                            ]
[*** If "Fig." is in small-caps (or italics), include the       ]
[*** number and period in the small-caps (or italics) tag. If   ]
[*** the caption also is in small-caps, it is acceptable to use ]
[*** just one set of tags to enclose "Fig. nn. Caption text."   ]



02 Small_Caps 102-16A                 Updated  2015/02/04




/*
COPYRIGHT, 1903, BY
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY


Copyright, 1903, by Harper & Brothers
Copyright, 1903, by J. B. Lippincott Company
PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
*/
[*** Since all of the words on the first and last lines    ]
[*** are the same size, we cannot tell whether or not they ]
[*** should be in small-caps, and leave them untagged, as  ]
[*** though it's just a font-size change. For the same     ]
[*** reason, we ignore the larger numbers in the first     ]
[*** line.                                                 ]
[***                                                       ]
[*** The Copyright page is "Front Matter", so enclose it   ]
[*** in no-wraps.  It's a Major Division, so precede the   ]
[*** no-wraps with four blank lines.  You may leave either ]
[*** one or two blank lines between the top and bottom     ]
[*** parts.                                                ]



02 Small_Caps 102-17A                 Updated  2018/09/10

[Illustration: <sc>SPOTTED KING FISHER.</sc>--<i>Céryle Guttáta.</i>]

[*** The words in all-caps are about the height of the lower-case  ]
[*** letters of the words in italics, rather than the height of    ]
[*** the italicized capital letters, so we tag them as small-caps. ]



02 Small_Caps 102-18A                 Updated  2019/05/15




CONTENTS


/*
CHAPTER I      PAGE

<sc>The Etiology of Influenza. (By Francis G. Blake, M.D.; Thomas
M. Rivers, M.D.; James C. Small, M.D.)</sc>      25

Discussion, 43; Conclusions, 49.


CHAPTER II

<sc>Clinical Features and Bacteriology of Influenza and Its Associated
Purulent Bronchitis and Pneumonia. (By Francis
G. Blake, M.D., and Thomas M. Rivers, M.D.)</sc>      51

Influenza, 52; Purulent Bronchitis, 56; Pneumonia, 59; Hemolytic
Streptococcus Pneumonia Following Influenza, 70; Bacillus Influenzæ
Pneumonia Following Influenza, 72; Summary, 73; Discussion, 76.
*/
[*** The words in small caps are chapter titles, so enclose each title in one pair of small-caps ]
[*** tags. Don't close and re-open the tags to exclude the parentheses or the punctuation.       ]



03 Boldface 103-00A                 Updated  2015/10/31




A HISTORY OF ROME TO 565 A. D.[*** not bold; all-caps ]




CHAPTER I[*** not bold; all-caps, not small-caps, it's just a font-size change ]

THE GEOGRAPHY OF ITALY[*** not bold; heading lines are marked as bold only when mixed with       ]
                      [*** non-bold, or when requested by the Project Manager or Post-Processor. ]


Italy, ribbed by the Apennines, girdled by the Alps and the sea,
juts out like a "long pier-head" from Europe towards the northern
coast of Africa. It includes two regions of widely differing physical

[*** OVERVIEW OF BOLDFACE:         All of the rules for Italics apply to Boldface.               ]
[*** The Guidelines on Bold are simple: Basically, if it looks bold, tag it. If in doubt whether ]
[*** text is actually bold (rather than a print anomaly such as over-inking) ask in the Project  ]
[*** Discussion for clarification. Other than the items mentioned below such as headings, this   ]
[*** applies to inline text as well as 'stand-alone' text.                                       ]
[***                                                                                             ]
[*** Headings and sub-headings often are printed in fonts or sizes that make them appear to be   ]
[*** darker than normal text, but we do not mark them as bold unless other parts of the same     ]
[*** lines clearly are lighter. And that's why this first example begins with three lines that   ]
[*** are NOT marked as bold: they are headings.                                                  ]



03 Boldface 103-00C                 Updated  2011/04/12

The peninsula is slightly larger than the continental portion: together
their area is about 91,200 square miles.

[*** Line is a mix of bold and regular, so mark the bold part.]
[*** It's a "complete sentence," so the period goes INSIDE.]
<b>Continental Italy.</b> The continental portion of Italy consists of
the southern watershed of the Alps and the northern watershed of
the Apennines, with the intervening lowland plain, drained, for the



03 Boldface 103-01A                 Updated  2011/04/18

Mason of Virginia, disapproved of the Constitution and refused
to attach their signatures.

[*** Other text on the same line is not boldface, so we mark this. It's a "complete]
[*** sentence," so the period goes INSIDE. The em-dash goes OUTSIDE the markup.]
<b>Ratification of the Constitution.</b>--Before adjourning, the
convention resolved to send the draft of the Constitution
to Congress with the request that it should transmit the



03 Boldface 103-02A                 Updated  2011/04/18

adapted to secure local representation and makes responsibility
to the member's constituency more effective.

[*** Here are TWO "complete sentences." BOTH periods go INSIDE. Both em-dashes go OUTSIDE.]
<b>The Senate.</b>--<i>Purposes.</i>--Regarding the desirability of
creating a national legislature of two houses there was little
difference of opinion among the members of the convention.



03 Boldface 103-03A                 Updated  2011/02/27

[Illustration: A WALRUS HERD.]
[*** Just all-caps. Not small-caps, not bold.]



03 Boldface 103-04A                 Updated  2011/04/30




OF

A COLOUR MILL,[*** We do not mark heading lines that look bold]

<i>For Calico Printers</i>.
[*** There's a comma on the previous line, so this is part of a mixed sentence, and the]
[*** period goes OUTSIDE the tags.]


This Machine is delineated in fig. 3 of Plate 21. It has
several properties which I think important in the process of
grinding colours, either in a wet state or a dry. It consists of
a frame <i>A B</i>, which has a hollow centre, through which the
axis of the bevel wheel <i>C D</i> is brought in such manner as
[*** Mark as italics, but not as bold. Note that even the upright capital letters on]
[*** this page seem bold. It's just the typeface.]



03 Boldface 103-05A                 Updated  2011/04/21

[*** These headings are not a mix of boldface and regular, so do not mark them as bold.]


OPERATIONS UPON THE CONJUNCTIVA

THE REMOVAL OF FOREIGN BODIES[*** Not small-caps, not bold.]

Foreign bodies lodged in the conjunctival sac, unless embedded in the
conjunctiva, are usually found by the surgeon under the upper lid, the



03 Boldface 103-06A                 Updated  2011/04/19

[*** Only part of sentence is bold, so mark it, and the comma goes OUTSIDE.]

<b>The Bill of Rights</b>, says Bryce, is historically the most
interesting part of the state constitution, and if we may
judge by the space devoted to these provisions and the at-*



03 Boldface 103-07A                 Updated  2011/04/18




CHAPTER IV

THE STATE LEGISLATURE[*** Neither bold nor small-caps]


[*** Mix of bold and regular, so we mark it. "Complete sentence," so period goes INSIDE.]
[*** Em-dash is a separator, and goes OUTSIDE.]
<b>Powers of the State Legislatures.</b>--The powers of the
state legislature, unlike those of the city council and those
of the Congress of the United States, are not set forth in



03 Boldface 103-08A                 Updated  2011/04/12

sudden overthrow, seem to me never to have been clearly correlated by
[*** We do not mark Greek transliterations as italics or boldface.]
the historians. Solon's law (1) ordained that where an actual [Greek: stasis]
had arisen, every citizen must take some side, calculating that all



03 Boldface 103-09A                 Updated  2011/04/20

[*** The parentheses are part of this in-line sub-heading, and go INSIDE the tags. THIS IS UNUSUAL.]
§ 142. <b>Paraffin Oil (or kerosine, mineral oil, photogen, &c.)</b> is the chief product
resulting from the distillation of American petroleum--the usual specific gravity is
about ·802--it is a mixture of hydrocarbons of the paraffin series. It should be free
from the more volatile constituents, and hence should not take fire when a flame is
applied near the surface of the cold liquid.

[*** This in-line sub-heading is a complete sentence: period goes INSIDE]
§ 143. <b>Effects of Petroleum.</b>--Since we have here to deal with a commercial substance
of such different degrees of purity, and various samples of which are composed
of such various proportions of different hydrocarbons, its action can only be stated
in very general terms. Eulenberg has experimented with the lighter products
obtained from the distillation of Canadian petroleum. This contained sulphur products,
and was extremely poisonous, the vapour killing a rabbit in a short time, with



03 Boldface 103-10A                 Updated  2011/06/13

[*** Comma OUTSIDE, even though typesetter made it bold for appearance; it's still a separator.]
[*** Also, the section # and name are in one pair of markups. Technically, they are different  ]
[*** entities, but it doesn't make sense to use two pairs of markups with just a space between.]
<b>128. Memnon</b>, the son of Aurora and Tithonus, was king of the
Æthiopians. He went with warriors to assist his kindred in the
Trojan War, and was received by King Priam with honor. He



04 Gesperrt 104-00A                 Updated  2019/10/11

ablegen, was uns in unsern Verhältnissen Noth thut, und welche Staatseinrichtungen
und Gesetze unsern Bedürfnissen am anpassendsten sind.

<g>Nach unserer besten, innersten Ueberzeugung können wir
nur Eines finden, das uns in Deutschland zur Einheit und
zur Einigkeit zu führen vermag -- die Durchbildung eines
freien deutschen Verfassungslebens.</g> Nur das allen freien
Männern inwohnende Gefühl der Selbstachtung kann dem Deutschen
die Würde geben, die er in den schweren Kämpfen mit dem Auslande,

[*** OVERVIEW OF GESPERRT (with some examples of Antiqua and non-Fraktur):                       ]
[***                                                                                             ]
[*** "Gesperrt" refers to spaced-out text, as shown in the middle of the example above.  The     ]
[*** rules for formatting gesperrt are the same as for boldface, including the placement of      ]
[*** punctuation. If your eye isn't yet trained to recognize gesperrt, finding short occurrences ]
[*** of it will require extra care.                                                              ]
[***                                                                                             ]
[*** The fragment above was taken from a paragraph containing a mixture of gesperrt and normal   ]
[*** Fraktur text.  The entire paragraph is shown in the next example.                           ]
[***                                                                                             ]
[*** Also note that spaces around em-dashes are common practice in Fraktur projects containing   ]
[*** gesperrt.                                                                                   ]
[***                                                                                             ]
[*** Gesperrt hardly ever occurs in English, since italics and boldface are available for        ]
[*** emphasis, so it shouldn't be used unless the Project Comments/Discussion request it.        ]
[*** (There are two examples later on of gesperrt in English; it was needed in both cases.)      ]
[*** Spaced-out headings should not be tagged as gesperrt unless only some of the letters in a   ]
[*** heading are spaced-out. If you are unsure, ASK in the Project Discussion.                   ]



04 Gesperrt 104-00B                 Updated  2011/07/23

<g>Nach unserer besten, innersten Ueberzeugung können wir
nur Eines finden, das uns in Deutschland zur Einheit und
zur Einigkeit zu führen vermag -- die Durchbildung eines
freien deutschen Verfassungslebens.</g> Nur das allen freien
Männern inwohnende Gefühl der Selbstachtung kann dem Deutschen
die Würde geben, die er in den schweren Kämpfen mit dem Auslande,
welche vielleicht bald bevorstehen, so nöthig hat, und nur die unter
constitutionellen Regierungsformen so innige Verschmelzung von Staat
und Volk, wie die hier stattfindende fortwährende Betheiligung der
Bürger an allen Staatsangelegenheiten, <g>vermögen uns das Selbstbewußtsein
zu verleihen, das uns lehrt, für jede, selbst die
entfernteste Provinz wie</g> <b>ein</b> <g>Mann einzustehen, und für die
Ehre des deutschen Namens, für die Wohlfahrt des Gesammtvaterlandes
jeden Augenblick Blut und Leben zu
opfern</g>.

[*** The first sentence, and part of the last sentence, are in gesperrt. There is one bold word ]
[*** in the middle of the last phrase, and it is not in gesperrt.  Since only part of the last  ]
[*** sentence is in gesperrt, the ending period goes OUTSIDE the markups.                       ]



04 Gesperrt 104-01A                 Updated  2011/07/24

vom 22. August bis 1. October 1830 einnahm. Und an diesem
Tage trat er mit einem Monatsgehalt von acht Thalern (vom
December ab von zehn Thalern) und fünf Thalern Neujahrsgeschenk
in die Dienste des Schauspieldirectors <g>Ringelhardt</g>
als <g>Theaterdiener</g>.[*** normal word between two in gesperrt. Close/re-open the tags.]

Man sollte kaum für möglich halten, daß ein Mann in
solcher Lage, so schwer gefesselt an die niedersten Erdensorgen,
so tief gestellt in der menschlichen Gesellschaft, den sittlichen Muth



04 Gesperrt 104-02A                 Updated  2011/07/24

Sache so darzulegen, wie es dem gesunden Verstande des schlichten
Bürgers sich darstellen muß. Denn nicht etwa eine besonders hoch-,
vielleicht auch <g>ver</g>bildete Classe von Staatsangehörigen haben wir bei
unserm Werke im Auge, sondern wünschen vielmehr die Gesammtheit
aller denkenden Bürger zu Lesern zu haben, um uns mit ihnen über
die wichtigsten Zeitinteressen zu verständigen.

[*** When only part of a word is in gesperrt, mark just that part, and don't leave a space after ]
[*** the closing tag. This is just like a partially-italicized word. And both of them are very   ]
[*** hard to spot.                                                                               ]
[*** There's a little space after each of the three letters "v," "e", and "r", and the other     ]
[*** letters of the word are spaced normally. So, "ver" and not "verb" is in gesperrt.           ]



04 Gesperrt 104-03A                 Updated  2011/07/28

fort -- war Blum bei der Zusammensetzung des großen Vorbereitungskomité[*** Antiqua "é"]
nicht zu umgehen; noch weniger vermöge seiner
Stellung als Schriftsteller und Agitator. Die Protocolle über
die Comitésitzungen, die Blum geführt hat, weisen nach, wie er
hauptsächlich den politisch-nationalen und fortschrittlich-demonstrativen
Charakter des Festes gegenüber dem ursprünglichen Project

[*** This is not an example of gesperrt, but of the use of Antiqua in the middle of Fraktur text. ]
[*** There are two occurrences of an Antiqua "é" here: in the Image, the first one is on the      ]
[*** second line, first word, last letter.  The second one is on the fourth line, second word,    ]
[*** sixth letter.  There are no accented letters in Fraktur, so the typesetter used Antiqua.     ]
[*** There is no reason for us to mark such individual letters. However, when whole words are in  ]
[*** Antiqua or non-Fraktur fonts, they should be tagged, as the next example shows.              ]



04 Gesperrt 104-04A                 Updated  2011/07/23

Der Beweis der <g>Widerrechtlichkeit</g> der Selbsttötung
könnte nur aus dem exakten Nachweis der positivrechtlichen
Tötungsnorm geführt werden.[10] Dafür fehlt aber das
Material überall, wo die Selbsttötung nicht unter Strafe
gestellt oder sonst unzweideutig als Delikt gekennzeichnet
ist.[11] Oder sie könnte sich als Folgerung aus rechtlich feststehenden
Prämissen ergeben. Solchen Nachweis versucht
<g>Feuerbach</g>, aber in der unzulänglichsten Weise. »Wer in
den Staat eintritt -- der Neugeborene tritt aber doch nicht
ein! --, verpflichtet dem Staat seine Kräfte und handelt
rechtswidrig, wenn er ihm diese durch Selbstmord eigenmächtig
raubt«.[12] Das ist offenbar eine nichtssagende <f>petitio
principii</f>.[*** Period belongs to the sentence, not to the phrase, and goes OUTSIDE the tags.]

[*** Besides containing two words in gesperrt, this paragraph ends with a non-Fraktur phrase.   ]
[*** The Project Comments specified using the <f> </f> tags in such cases, and that is common   ]
[*** practice for these kinds of projects. (The example doesn't show the footnotes.)            ]



04 Gesperrt 104-05A                 Updated  2013/05/20

<b>188.</b> A root ending in a vowel is called a <i>Vowel Root</i>: as, <b><g>da-</g></b>, <i>give</i>; a root ending
in a consonant is called a <i>Consonant Root</i>: as, <b><g>rup-</g></b>, <i>break</i>. Roots are conveniently
indicated by the sign [sqrt]: as, [sqrt]<b><g>teg-</g></b>, to be read 'root <b><g>teg-</g></b>.'

[*** Gesperrt also may appear in English-language projects. (This was, by far, the simplest paragraph on the page.)      ]
[*** When in-line markups (bold and gesperrt in this example) are nested, it doesn't matter which pair is inside, but it ]
[*** should be done the same way every time.                                                                             ]



04 Gesperrt 104-06A                 Updated  2011/07/24

The five-pointed star kite, Fig.
38, is neat and artistic. The
framework is given to the
left.

[*** This is an example of "spaced-out" text that is NOT gesperrt.  At the end of the        ]
[*** third line, "the" was spread out to make the line fully justified, not to emphasize it. ]



04 Gesperrt 104-07A                 Updated  2011/07/28

[*** Here is another example of spaced-out text that should NOT be marked as gesperrt: a heading]
Man bezeichne dieses dann als zur Definition gehörig,
zur Gattung gehörig und so fort. So haben wir ja auch
das, was wir bereits angeführt haben, so ziemlich
an seinem Orte untergebracht[12].




Siebentes Kapitel.[*** The Guidelines tell us not to mark bold or gesperrt in headings.]


Zu allererst müssen wir von dem Identischen handeln,
und angeben, in wie vielfacher Bedeutung man
von ihm spricht[13].

[*** (Footnotes not shown.)]



04 Gesperrt 104-08A                 Updated  2011/07/24




1

Im Adlernest[*** And a spaced-out heading in Fraktur. We don't mark gesperrt or bold in headings.]


In schnellem Flug huschte dann und wann der schneeweiße
Körper einer Möwe vorüber und leuchtete grell gegen
das von keinen Wolken bedeckte Blau des Himmels auf.



04 Gesperrt 104-09A                 Updated  2013/05/20

/#
zum 60. Lebensjahre jährlich bezahlen; es sei denn, dass die
Person -- gesetzlich oder vom Assessor des Distriktes ihrer
Armuth oder Schwächlichkeit wegen -- von der Steuer[*** This German project requested spaces   ]
befreit worden ist.                                [*** surrounding em-dashes.                 ]

Die Schulsteuer.[*** We don't mark gesperrt headings, but these are of the quoted text, so ask ]
[*** the Project Manager what to do. Below: the number and period go INSIDE, just like italics.]

<g>Section 3.</g> Eine jährliche Steuer von 2 Dollar soll ein
jeder männliche Einwohner des Königreiches von seinem
20. bis zum 60. Lebensjahre zur Unterhaltung der öffentlichen
Schulen bezahlen; es sei denn, dass die Person --
gesetzlich oder vom Assessor seines Distriktes -- ihrer
Gebrechlichkeit, Schwäche oder Armuth wegen davon
befreit ist, oder zur Zeit noch studirend in einer der
Schulen oder Hochschulen sich befindet.

Steuer für Thiere.

<g>Section 4.</g> Für jeden Hund hat der Besitzer eines solchen,
jährlich eine Steuer von 1 Dollar zu zahlen. Der Steuercollektor
soll gegen Empfang des Betrages, dem Besitzer
#/



04 Gesperrt 104-10A                 Updated  2013/10/02

Flugmaat Ernst <g>Steinitz</g>, Fluglehrer bei einer Flug-See-Station,
Gefr. <g>Unger</g>, Berthold <g>Gutmann</g> (Bavariae, K. C.
Verbindung) und Flugzeugobermaat <g>Rosenberger</g> (Viadrina
im selben Verband).

/#[*** Could be a list (?)  If so, rejoin the spillover lines and use no-wrap tags.]
<g>Lilienthal</g>-Berlin, Neffe des Syndikus der jüdischen
Gemeinde;[*** hyphen OUTSIDE]

Unteroffizier <g>Maier</g>, Sohn des Großh. Bezirkstierarztes Dr.,
Konstanz, Luftschiffer;

Flieger Hugo <g>Kaplan</g>, Berlin, Brunnenstraße 181;
#/



04 Gesperrt 104-11A                 Updated  2011/07/24

desselben heraus; er war ein Schüler von Celtis und hatte sich nach
dessen Vorbild der deutschen Geschichte schon früh eifrig zugewandt[3].
So traten nach einander die vorzüglichsten Geschichtschreiber des
deutschen Mittelalters ans Licht; 1521 erschienen in Cöln auch die
Werke Einhards, herausgegeben von dem Grafen <g>Hermann
von Nuenar</g>[4]; in Mainz die Chronik des Regino von <g>Sebastian
von Rotenhan</g>[5].

[*** Keep footnote anchors OUTSIDE in-line markups if possible, as shown here.  However, if the ]
[*** emphasized text that you are marking continues after the anchor in such a way that you     ]
[*** would have used just one pair of tags absent the anchor, then let the anchor remain inside ]
[*** the one pair of tags. (That is, don't close/re-open the tags just to keep the anchor       ]
[*** outside the tags.) This applies to all in-line markups in all languages.                   ]
[*** (Footnotes not shown in this example.)                                                     ]



04 Gesperrt 104-13A                 Updated  2016/03/28

<g>Petrarch's</g> Laura was delineated by a contemporary in this manner
and in the time of <g>Michael Angelo</g> the process was still in use. These styles
were then introduced into Germany from Italy, under what particular name, we
know not. In Italy they are called "<g>Stile</g>", but even they never seem at any
time to have been the universally acknowledged drawing material.

About the same period the pen came into use as a drawing- as well as
writing-material, to which were added, in the most flourishing days of painting,
black chalk and red chalk which enjoyed extensive use. The Italians obtained
the best red chalk from Germany and the best black chalk from Spain. <g>Vasari</g>,
speaking of an artist of the sixteenth century, especially remarks that he understood
how to use style, pen, black chalk and red chalk with equal dexterity.

To this period belongs also the discovery of black lead and with it the
production of an entirely new writing- and drawing-material--<g>The Lead Pencil</g>.
[*** English text using gesperrt]



04 Gesperrt 104-14A                 Updated  2019/10/06

by renewed efforts of force. But even if the necessities of the case
bad been less imperative, he would have been able to overbear all
opposition of his own countrymen through the numerous mercenary
strangers, now in Phokis and present at the assembly under the
name of allies.[1] In fact, so irresistible was his ascendency by
means of this large paid force under his command, that both Demosthenes
and Æschines[2] denominate him (as well as his predecessor
and his successor) not general, but despot, of the Phokians.

[Footnote 1: Diodor. xvi. 32. [Greek: Hoi de Phôkeis--epanêlthon eis Delphous kai synelthontes
<g>meta tôn symmachôn</g> eis koinên ekklêsian, ebouleuonto peri
tou polemou.]]

[*** The gesperrt tag is used in the second line of Footnote 1.                                   ]
[*** Gesperrt is the normal method of emphasizing Greek. Italics can't be used because Greek      ]
[*** fonts usually look slanted (which is why we don't tag Greek as italic), and boldface would   ]
[*** require printers to buy a whole new 'bold' font, which would be too expensive. (Apparently,  ]
[*** some printers have used boldface Greek for emphasis, so we can't say "never bold.")          ]
[*** Underlining could be used, but nobody seems to do that.                                      ]

[Footnote 2: Æschines, Fals. Leg. p. 286. c. 41. [Greek: tôn en Phôkeusi tyrannôn], etc.
Demosthen. cont. Aristokrat. p. 661. s. 147. [Greek: Phaullos ho Phôkeus ê tis allos
deuastês], etc.]



04 Gesperrt 104-15A                 Updated  2019/10/06

[*** Here are four examples of ligatures in gesperrt. The last one is particularly hard to spot. ]
/*
-- Was kümmert's dich? Du fragst
Nach Dingen, Mädchen, die dir nicht geziemen.

<g>Schiller.</g>
*/
[*** ]
Stein, und sein einziger, immer wiederkehrender Gedanke war,
den nächtlichen Freund »<g>zu stellen und ein Wort mit
ihm zu sprechen</g>«.
[*** ]
»Ei, ei, Wertester!« sagte der Kanzler, dem es nicht entging,
welchen mächtigen Eindruck diese Worte auf Ulrich machten,
»ei! Ihr sprechet doch auch etwas zu kühnlich. Ist übrigens
jetzt auch gar nicht die Rede von <g>damals</g>, sondern von
<g>jetzt</g>. Die Landschaft ist von der alten Huldigung gänzlich abgekommen,
hat dem Bunde eine andere Huldigung getan; Seine
[*** ]
Georg wollte sich entschuldigen, der Herzog aber fiel ihm in
die Rede: »Ihr vergesset, daß <g>ich</g> es war, der ihn zu Euch schickte
mit Brief und Siegel, er kam ja nicht von selbst zu Euch; doch



04 Gesperrt 104-16A                 Updated  2019/10/11

This regard that Madame Blavatsky
had for her colleague William Q. Judge
continued undiminished until her death
in 1891, when he became her successor.

Madame Blavatsky, in 1889, writing
in her Theosophical magazine published
in London, said that the purpose of the
magazine was not only to promulgate
Theosophy, but also and as a consequence
of such promulgation, "to bring
to light the hidden things of darkness."
She further says:

/#
As to the "weak-minded Theosophists"--if
any--they can take care of themselves
in the way they please. <sc>If the "false
prophets of Theosophy" are to be left untouched,
the <g>true</g> prophets will be very
soon--as they have already been--confused
with the false. It is high time to
winnow our corn and cast away the
chaff.</sc> The Theosophical Society is becoming
enormous in its numbers, and if the <i>false</i>
prophets, the pretenders, or even the weak-minded
dupes, are left alone, then the Society
threatens to become very soon a fanatical
body split into three hundred sects--like
Protestantism--each hating the other, and
all bent on destroying the truth by monstrous
exaggerations and idiotic schemes and shams.

We do not believe in allowing the presence
#/
[*** Never say "never". Here is a genuine use of gesperrt ]
[*** in English text: the word "true" in the small-caps   ]
[*** text of the third paragraph.                         ]



05 Nowrap 105-00A                 Updated  2011/04/30

But what is the result? As plaintiff in the cause Shylock
would, in the natural course of justice, leave the court, when
judgment had been given against him, with no further
mortification than the loss of his suit. He is about to do so
when he is recalled:

/*
It is enacted in the laws of Venice, &c.
*/
[*** This line looks different from the other text: it's surrounded by extra white space,]
[*** but it isn't a heading, so it must be marked either in no-wrap or as a Block Quote.]
[*** If you were formatting the project, you would already know that this is a discussion]
[*** of "The Merchant of Venice," which is a Metrical Play. That's like Verse, which is not]
[*** wrappable, so it must be enclosed in no-wrap. By contrast, see the next example.]

Unwittingly, he has, by the action he has taken, entangled
himself with an old statute law, forgotten by all except the

[*** OVERVIEW OF NO-WRAP:                                                                      ]
[*** We use the no-wrap markups for certain blocks (full lines) of text:                       ]
[*** 1. when line breaks and/or indentation need to be preserved.                              ]
[***    Those conditions occur with Lists, Poetry, Tables, Metrical Drama, and Front Matter    ]
[***    such as Title Pages and Tables of Content.  (This is not a complete list.)             ]
[*** 2. when lines of text need to be right-justified.                                         ]
[*** 3. to call attention to certain kinds of special formatting requirements, such as the     ]
[***    line in the above example.                                                             ]
[*** 4. No-wraps may occur within Block Quotes, BUT *NOT* THE OTHER WAY AROUND (BECAUSE A BQ   ]
[***    MEANS THE TEXT CAN BE RE-WRAPPED, BUT NOTHING WITHIN A NO-WRAP CAN BE RE-WRAPPED).     ]
[*** What all of those situations have in common is that they involve blocks of text that look ]
[*** different from regular text, and the line breaks in those blocks must be preserved.       ]
[*** By contrast, when a block of text looks "different" but there is no need to preserve the  ]
[*** line breaks, we use a Block Quote.                                                        ]



05 Nowrap 105-00B                 Updated  2011/04/21

blessing upon the worship of his ally, though opposed
to his own, for in his letter he writes:

/#
"<sc>Blessed be the Lord God of Israel</sc>,"
[*** This looks very much like the previous example: it's different from the surrounding text ]
[*** because it's surrounded by white space, and it isn't a heading. When there's only one    ]
[*** line, it's often hard to know whether it's wrappable (Block Quote) or not (no-wrap).     ]
[*** The (non-universal) consensus is to use no-wrap when you just cannot tell. Often, the    ]
[*** surrounding text will help you decide, as it does here: the line just above it says,     ]
[*** "in his letter," which suggests prose (wrappable). Also, on the previous page of the     ]
[*** project (which is not in these examples), is a two-line quote from the same letter,      ]
[*** and it's clearly wrappable prose. So, a Block Quote is appropriate here. If you just     ]
[*** can't tell, use no-wrap AND leave a [**note]. Do not leave it unmarked.                  ]
[*** The quote is in small-caps, so that must be marked, too; and both the comma and the      ]
[*** quotation marks go OUTSIDE the in-line markups.                                          ]
#/

and that his actions should be in keeping with his
words, he forthwith entered into a Treaty to build the
first Temple to the ever-living and the only <sc>God</sc> at
Jerusalem.



05 Nowrap 105-01A                 Updated  2013/03/21




BOOKS IN THE "FAIRY SERIES"


[*** A simple list. Enclose in     ]
[*** no-wrap. Mark each italicized ]
[*** entry separately. Ignore the  ]
[*** box and the line. List is     ]
[*** single-spaced in image, can   ]
[*** be single-spaced here, as     ]
[*** it's in no-wrap.              ]
/*
<i>The English Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Welsh Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Irish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Scottish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Italian Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Hungarian Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Indian Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Spanish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Danish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Norwegian Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Jewish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Swedish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Chinese Fairy Book</i>
*/



05 Nowrap 105-02A                 Updated  2011/04/19

Looking upon the picturesque little town and harbor
one might well feel with and join the native poetess in
the heartiness of her toast:

[*** It's poetry and we want to preserve the line breaks, so use no-wrap, not Block]
[*** Quote. At least one line of a no-wrap block (such as a stanza of poetry) must be]
[*** left-justified, and there's no indentation within this stanza, so left-justify]
[*** all of these lines.  We ignore the apparent indentation caused by the quotation]
[*** mark on the first line of quoted poetry.]
/*
'No stately monuments adorn thy coast;
No ancient abbey canst thou boast;
Yet I will pledge with heart and hand
Thy health forever, Newfoundland."[** Opens with single quote]
*/

As Halifax differs from all cities in the United States,
so does St. Johns differ from Halifax, but as Halifax



05 Nowrap 105-04A                 Updated  2011/04/21

Although in every case I have told the tale in my own words, I am
indebted for the originals to Campbell's "Popular Tales of the Western
Highlands," Leyden's Poems, Hogg's Poems, Scott's "Border Minstrelsy,"
Chambers' "Popular Rhymes of Scotland," "The Folklore
Journal," etc.

[*** Signature is right-justified, so enclose it in no-wrap. Use no-wrap to keep]
[*** Location/Date on separate lines. Enclose all 3 lines in the same no-wrap.]
/*
<sc>Elizabeth W. Grierson.</sc>

<i>Whitchesters, Hawick, N.B.,
12th April, 1910.</i>
*/



05 Nowrap 105-05A                 Updated  2011/03/03

of La Fontaine joining her circle. La Fontaine seems to have
felt some interest in England and the English, who, he says,

/*
[*** First line is indented in Image because it's an extract,]
[*** and beginning of actual line was omitted. Preserve the]
[*** indentation and use an even number of spaces when]
[*** approximating the original indentation (even though you]
[*** are working in monospace and book used variable font).]
                        pensent profondément;
Leur esprit, en cela, suit leur tempérament,
Creusant dans les sujets, et forts d'expériences,
Ils étendent partout l'empire des sciences.
*/

To Mrs. Harvey, sister of Lord Montagu and friend of the
Duchess of Mazarin, he dedicated his fable <i>Le Renard Anglais</i>.



05 Nowrap 105-06A                 Updated  2011/04/19

English for their most unclassical Latin. An
explanation of the following terms, which are
in constant use, is therefore indispensable in
a work of this nature;

/#
[*** A "Hanging Indent" is a paragraph in which all lines]
[*** except the first are indented. This page contains a]
[*** series of Hanging Indents, preceded by extra white]
[*** space. Either of those is sufficient reason to use a]
[*** Block Markup. Although it's a List, the text is]
[*** wrappable, so use a Block Quote, not a no-wrap.]
<i>Angled Guard</i>--A stone which obliquely covers
or guards one stone or more.

<i>Bias</i>--An inclination in the ice, tending to
lead a stone off the direction given to it
by the player.

<i>Block the ice</i>--See "fill the ice."

<i>Boardhead</i>--See "brough."

<i>Break an egg on</i>--To strike one stone very
gently with another.

<i>Brough</i>--(Alemanic, <i>bruchus</i>, a camp, often
circular). The space within the largest
circle drawn round the tee.
#/



05 Nowrap 105-07A                 Updated  2013/04/05

[Footnote 1: The Koribantes remind us of the Salii of the Latins, to whom
Numa gives the arms and the words, to be sung leaping. According to
Ovid's distich--
 
/*
[*** Poetry or song. Need to preserve line breaks. Precede an opening no-wrap with a  ]
[*** blank line, even when it's in a footnote, sidenote, or illustration. The only    ]
[*** exception is when it's at the very top of a page and the material in no-wraps is ]
[*** a continuation of a stanza or list from the preceding page. And note that the    ]
[*** right-justified attribution is in the same no-wrap, but is left-justified, as it ]
[*** isn't part of the verse.                                                         ]
[*** NOTE: some Project Managers and Post-Processors prefer tagging attributions      ]
[*** separately, since they are indented differently from the verse or quotation.     ]
"Jam dederat Salii (a saltu nomina ducunt)
  Armaque et ad certos verba canenda modos."
 
--<i>Fasti</i>, iii. 389.
*/
]
[*** The closing no-wrap tag and the closing footnote bracket MUST be on separate     ]
[*** lines, but do not need a blank line between them. This applies to other          ]
[*** combinations of "closing" tags as well (e.g., the end of a no-wrap followed by   ]
[*** the end of a Block Quote).                                                       ]



05 Nowrap 105-08A                 Updated  2014/02/11

/*
Per omnes gradus militiae navalis eluctatus
Propraetor Patriae
Classes et expeditiones maritimas
Annis XX rexit.
Decies quinque Classibus collatis cum hoste
conflixit,
Raro aequata clade; plerumque Victor ac
Triumphator praeliis rediit.
Restabat magnus tot belli facinoribus
Imponendus dies VIII Nov.
A. CIC IC CLVIII.
In recto Maris Baltici supremum Virtutis
opus edidit.
Ibi primum in praelium ruens,
Praetoriam Suecorum invasit, afflixit,
Dein propraetorianae praegrandes alias,
Eorundem aliquot,
Armis, viris, animis
Instructissimas, sola propraetoria sua, rejecit,
afflixit, submersit;
Donec a sociis undique desertus, ab hostibus
undique circumfusus, discerpto globis
corpore, Bellatricem animam coelo
reddidit.

Corpus
Ipse Rex hostis
generosa fortitudinis hostilis admiratione,
splendide compositum in patriam remisit.
Vixit LIX annos.
Sic redeunt quos honor ac virtus remittunt.
*/
[*** This was a full page. It may be an inscription, and it   ]
[*** certainly isn't poetry, so left-justify every line. (We  ]
[*** do not indicate or preserve centering when formatting.)  ]
[*** Enclose it in no-wraps to preserve the line breaks.      ]
[*** Precede the opening no-wrap with a blank line to         ]
[*** separate it from whatever text was on the previous page. ]



06 Block_quotes 106-00A                 Updated  2011/05/04




CHAPTER  II.

/#
[*** Sub-headings often need to be enclosed in Block Quotes. This one is printed as a]
[*** Hanging Indent (first line at left margin, other lines indented).]
<sc>Crossing the Gulf of St. Lawrence.--Our First Ice.--An
Abandoned Boat.--In the Midst of the Floe.--Newfoundland
Fishermen.--Off for Cape Desolation.</sc>
#/


We left Sydney at 8.30 <sc>P.M.</sc>, June 12th, the night
being clear and the water smooth. The ship

[*** OVERVIEW OF BLOCK QUOTES:                                                           ]
[*** A "block" is full lines of text, sometimes running for several pages, that looks    ]
[*** "different" from other text in the book.  It may be in a smaller (or larger) font,  ]
[*** have wider margins, be a Hanging Indent, just be preceded and followed by extra     ]
[*** white space, or for some other reason require special handling. If the line breaks  ]
[*** in that block need to be preserved, we enclose the text in no-wraps, as illustrated ]
[*** in the preceding Category of examples. If the line breaks do not need to be         ]
[*** preserved (that is, if the text is "wrappable,") we enclose the text in Block       ]
[*** Quotes. The text does NOT need to be a quotation, despite the term we use here.     ]
[*** And sometimes, the "difference" is not obvious.                                     ]
[*** Block Quotes can contain other Block Quotes and no-wraps, but no-wraps cannot       ]
[*** contain Block Quotes, because nothing within a no-wrap can be re-wrapped.           ]



06 Block_quotes 106-01A                 Updated  2011/04/18

Also contemporaneous with Dalton was the great
German chemist, Berzelius, who confirmed and extended
the discoveries of Dalton. More than this,
it has been said of Berzelius:

/#
[*** Text is preceded by white space, it is a quotation, and it is wrappable (we don't]
[*** need to preserve the line breaks). This is a classic example of a Block Quote.]
"In him were united all the different impulses
which have advanced the science since the beginning
#/



06 Block_quotes 106-03A                 Updated  2011/05/04

Curlers to abolish the language of the rink,
as it would be for the gentlemen of certain
learned professions, to substitute the Queen's
English for their most unclassical Latin. An
explanation of the following terms, which are
in constant use, is therefore indispensable in
a work of this nature;

/#[*** This is a series of Hanging Indents,]
[*** preceded by extra white space. Either of those]
[*** is sufficient reason to use a Block Markup.]
[*** Although it's a List, the text is wrappable,]
[*** so use a Block Quote, not a no-wrap.]
<i>Angled Guard</i>--A stone which obliquely covers
or guards one stone or more.

<i>Bias</i>--An inclination in the ice, tending to
lead a stone off the direction given to it
by the player.

<i>Block the ice</i>--See "fill the ice."

<i>Boardhead</i>--See "brough."

<i>Break an egg on</i>--To strike one stone very
gently with another.

<i>Brough</i>--(Alemanic, <i>bruchus</i>, a camp, often
circular). The space within the largest
circle drawn round the tee.
#/



06 Block_quotes 106-04A                 Updated  2011/04/12




THE SACRED NAMES IN QUICHE MYTHOLOGY.

[*** Use a Block Quote because this sub-heading is in a smaller font than the main text.]
[*** Tip: Besides the actual appearance in the Image pane, there are two measurable cues:]
[*** the Image pane can show more of these lines than regular (taller) lines, and in the]
[*** monospaced Text pane, these lines are wider than regular lines.]
/#
<i>Contents.</i>--The Quiches of Guatemala, and their relationship--Their
Sacred Book, the <i>Popol Vuh</i>--Its opening words--The name
Hun-Ahpu-Vuch--Hun-Ahpu-Utiu--Nim-ak--Nim-tzyiz--Tepeu--Gucumatz--Qux-cho
and Qux-palo--Ah-raxa-lak and Ah-raxa-sel--Xpiyacoc
and Xmucane--Cakulha--Huracan--Chirakan--Xbalanque
and his Journey to Xibalba.
#/[*** End of headings. Leave 2 blank lines above body.]


Of the ancient races of America, those which approached
the nearest to a civilized condition spoke related
dialects of a tongue, which from its principal members has
been called the "Maya-Quiche" linguistic stock. Even



06 Block_quotes 106-04A1                 Updated  2017/06/11




THE SACRED NAMES IN QUICHE MYTHOLOGY.

[*** This paragraph is part of the heading, but does not need to be marked as a Block Quote, ]
[*** because it looks like normal text and is not a quotation. NOTE: This is a revision, and ]
[*** changes the guidance previously given for this example.                                 ]
<i>Contents.</i>--The Quiches of Guatemala, and their relationship--Their
Sacred Book, the <i>Popol Vuh</i>--Its opening words--The name
Hun-Ahpu-Vuch--Hun-Ahpu-Utiu--Nim-ak--Nim-tzyiz--Tepeu--Gucumatz--Qux-cho
and Qux-palo--Ah-raxa-lak and Ah-raxa-sel--Xpiyacoc
and Xmucane--Cakulha--Huracan--Chirakan--Xbalanque
and his Journey to Xibalba.
[*** End of headings. Leave 2 blank lines above body.                                        ]


Of the ancient races of America, those which approached
the nearest to a civilized condition spoke related
dialects of a tongue, which from its principal members has
been called the "Maya-Quiche" linguistic stock. Even



06 Block_quotes 106-05A                 Updated  2017/06/11




<sc>The Things Seen and the Things
Not Seen.</sc>

PREACHED IN CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL,
EASTER DAY, 1915.

/#[*** Unlike the previous example, this paragraph should be marked as a Block Quote, because ]
  [*** it is in quotation marks.                                                              ]
"<i>For which cause we faint not; but though our outward
man perish, yet the inward man is renewed day by
day. For our light affliction, which is but for a moment,
worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight
of glory; while we look not at the things which are seen,
but at the things which are not seen: for the things which
are seen are temporal; but the things which are not
seen are eternal.</i>"--2 Cor. iv. 16.
#/


These touching words of St. Paul are
based upon the grand truth to which
Easter Day is a standing witness. "Therefore,"
he says, or "for which cause, we



06 Block_quotes 106-06A                 Updated  2011/05/30

*sion.[1] Questioned as to where his policy of acquisition was to
end, the following colloquy ensued:

/#[*** quoted text, printed in smaller font, wrappable, preceded and]
[*** followed by blank lines.]
"A. I would go on with it. If I thought we could realize something
more than we have got from these investments I would go on and
buy some more things.

<tb>

"Q. Supposing that you got the Santa Fe?

"A. You would not let us get it.

"Q. How could we help it?

"A. How could you help it? I think you would bring out your
power to enforce the conditions of the Sherman anti-trust act pretty
quick. If you will let us, I will go and take the Santa Fe to-morrow.

"Q. You would take it to-morrow?

"A. Why, certainly I would; I would not have any hesitation;
it is a pretty good property.

"Q. Then it is only the restriction of the law that keeps you from
taking it?

"A. I would go on as long as I live.

"Q. Then after you had gotten through with the Santa Fe and
had taken it, you would also take the Northern Pacific and Great
Northern, if you could get them?

"A. If you would let me.

"Q. And your power, which you have, would gradually increase
as you took one road after another, so that you might spread not only
over the Pacific coast, but spread out over the Atlantic coast?

"A. Yes."
#/

[*** No indentation, probably not a new paragraph. Leave a note.]
Was there ever a clearer case of megalomania, menacing the
welfare of a great people?[** not a new pargraph]



06 Block_quotes 106-08A                 Updated  2012/08/31

/#
[*** Continuation of a letter. Even though it's in the same font size as the regular]
[*** text and has the same margins, the Project Comments specified that letters should]
[*** be in Block Quotes. So, enclose all of it, including the signature (which also needs]
[*** to be in no-wrap, because it's right-justified), in Block Quotes.]
read this letter with more pain than I feel in writing it.
But it seems indispensable to me to communicate my
sentiments of the Duke's present situation to his nearest
relation and dearest friend. His life is invaluable to his
country and to his family, and how dear it is to his
friends can only be estimated by those who know the
soundness of his understanding, the uprightness and
truth of his judgment, and the generosity and warmth
of his feelings.

/*[*** Indented further than a normal paragraph]
I am always, my dear Lord, most truly yours,

<sc>Walter Scott</sc>.[*** right-justified]
*/[*** No blank line between the two "closing" tags.]
#/

Scott's letters of this and the two following months
are very much occupied with the painful subject of the
Duke of Buccleuch's health; but those addressed to his



06 Block_quotes 106-09A                 Updated  2011/03/04

Looking upon the picturesque little town and harbor
one might well feel with and join the native poetess in
the heartiness of her toast:

[*** It's poetry, so use no-wrap, NOT Block Quote]
/*
'No stately monuments adorn thy coast;
No ancient abbey canst thou boast;
Yet I will pledge with heart and hand
Thy health forever, Newfoundland."[** Opens with single quote]
*/

As Halifax differs from all cities in the United States,
so does St. Johns differ from Halifax, but as Halifax
possesses features distinctively its own, so St. Johns



06 Block_quotes 106-10A                 Updated  2011/05/04

[*** This is from a book of correspondence. There were]
[*** three kinds of text in it: the Editor's commentary,]
[*** quotations from a correspondent's diary, and the]
[*** letters. The diary quotations and the letters are]
[*** in Block Quotes; the commentary is not.]
/#[*** Diary entry]
called according to His purpose,' and since there
never was a moment when the Duke did not sink
into the utmost insignificance in comparison with
His good will and pleasure, such must necessarily
follow.

"The poor Duke's next letter, dated July 13th I
will copy throughout as it refers to his affliction--in
the loss of his Grand Son."[10][*** This book uses Endnotes.]
#/

This letter is interesting as giving a glimpse
of that softer side of the Duke's nature, generally
lost sight of in contemplation of his
sterner characteristics.

/#[*** A letter; enclose in Block Quotes.]
/*[*** A blank line between an opening Block Quote and an]
[*** opening no-wrap is OPTIONAL, unless the Project's]
[*** Comments express a preference.]
<sc>London</sc>, July 13, 1846.
*/

<sc>My dear Miss J.</sc>,--I have received your letters
of the 12^{th} and friday last on the subject of the loss
I recently sustained of my Grandson, the eldest Son
of my second son. Poor boy! he died on Tuesday!
By the Mercy of God! the second son, an infant has
recovered. But at one time I was apprehensive that
the grief of the Mother who was nursing the youngest
child would have affected Her Health; and that
we should have lost that Child; and eventually the
Mother. But thank God! Both are now safe! I am
very sensible of your kindness upon this occasion. I
wish that it was in my power to tell you that I have
any prospect of being able to go to see you! But I
cannot expect to be able to do so at present! Believe
me, My Dear Miss J. Ever Yours

/*
Most faithfully,
<sc>Wellington</sc>.
*/
#/[*** No blank line between "closing" markups.]



06 Block_quotes 106-11A                 Updated  2011/05/04


/#[*** New Section, and in a smaller font than main text of book (not shown here); use Block Quotes]
<b>References.</b>--<sc>Beard</sc>, American Government and Politics, chs. xxii-xxiii.
<sc>Bryce</sc>, The American Commonwealth (abridged edition),
chs. xxxiv-xxxv. <sc>Dealey</sc>, Our State Constitutions, chs. ii-iii. <sc>Hart</sc>,
Actual Government, ch. vi. <sc>Hinsdale</sc>, The American Government,
chs. xl, xli, xlix, 1[** 'l'?]. <sc>Wilson</sc>, The State, secs. 1087-1095. <sc>Willoughby</sc>,
Rights and Duties of Citizenship, ch. x. <sc>Willoughby</sc>,
The American Constitutional System, chs. ii-x.

<b>Documentary and Illustrative Material.</b>--1. <sc>Thorpe</sc>'s Constitutions
and Organic Laws, or <sc>Poore</sc>'s Charters and Constitutions, both
published by the Government Printing Office. 2. Pamphlet copies
of state constitutions can usually be obtained from the secretaries of
state of the various states. 3. The legislative manual of the state,
where usually a review of the constitutional history of the state may
be found.
#/


[*** Section Heading goes OUTSIDE the Block Quotes]
<sc>Research Questions</sc>

/#[*** smaller font than main text of book; use Block Quotes]
1. In what two senses is the word "state" used? In what sense is
New York a state and in what sense is it not?

2. Were the states ever sovereign? What were the two views in
this country prior to the Civil War in regard to the sovereignty of
the states?
#/



06 Block_quotes 106-12A                 Updated  2014/02/07

/#

GREEK GRAMMAR FOR SCHOOLS. Abridged from Matthiæ.
By the <sc>Bishop of London</sc>. <i>Seventh Edition</i>, revised by Rev. <sc>J. Edwards</sc>.
12mo. 3<i>s.</i>

---- Accidence for Schools. Abridged from Matthiæ.
By the <sc>Bishop of London</sc>. <i>Fourth Edition</i>, revised by Rev. <sc>J. Edwards</sc>.
12mo. 2<i>s.</i>

GROTE'S (<sc>George</sc>) History of Greece. From the Earliest Period
to the Accession of Philip of Macedon (<sc>B.C.</sc> 403-359). Maps. Vols. 1
to 10. 8vo. 16<i>s.</i> each. <i>The Work may be had as follows</i>:--

/#
<sc>Vols. I.-II.</sc>--Legendary Greece. Grecian History to the Reign of
Peisistratus at Athens.

<sc>Vols. III.-IV.</sc>--History of Early Athens, and the Legislation of Solon.
Grecian Colonies. View of the Contemporary Nations surrounding
Greece. Grecian History down to the first Persian Invasion, and the
Battle of Marathon.
#/
#/
[*** Each entry in this list of books is printed as a hanging indent, so the list, which is wrappable, must  ]
[*** be enclosed in Block quotes. The last entry contains a wrappable list of its own, so that "nested"      ]
[*** list needs its own Block quotes. Most of DP's markers and tags occur in pairs (open/close). Since the   ]
[*** nesting results in two "open" Block quote markers, there must be two closing ones, as shown here. We    ]
[*** close them on each page, even when we know they will re-open on the next page.  At the top, the blank   ]
[*** line appears after the opening Block Quote because it's part of the Block Quote: the Bibliography began ]
[*** on a previous page and a page break just happened to occur here.                                        ]
[***                                                                                                         ]
[*** It's acceptable to format <sc>Vols. I.-II.</sc> and <sc>Vols. III.-IV.</sc> as <sc>Vols.</sc> I.-II.    ]
[*** and <sc>Vols.</sc> III.-IV. because the results will be the same either way.                            ]



06 Block_quotes 106-13A                 Updated  2016/05/09

[*** This could be formatted either as a list or as a Block Quote, so it's best to ASK   ]
[*** about it in the Project Discussion. If formatted as a list, the two items that wrap ]
[*** should be unwrapped, and the list can be single-spaced. If formatted as a Block     ]
[*** Quote (because two items are printed as hanging indents), the items must be         ]
[*** separated with blank lines. Either way, a NOTE probably is appropriate.             ]
[*** This example also appears in the "Lists" category, formatted as a list.             ]

VEGETARIAN RESTAURANTS AND CAFES

/#
<sc>Vegetarian Cafe</sc>, 755 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal.

<sc>Vegetarian Restaurant</sc>, 44 San Pablo Avenue, Oakland, Cal.

<sc>Vegetarian Restaurant</sc>, 317 West Third Street, Los Angeles,
Cal.

<sc>Good Health Restaurant</sc>, 616 Third Street, Seattle, Wash.

<sc>Vegetarian Restaurant</sc>, 283 Pitt Street, Sydney, N. S. W.

<sc>Vegetarian Restaurant</sc>, 54 Farrar Street, Detroit, Mich.

<sc>Vegetarian Restaurant</sc>, 607 Locust Street, Des Moines, Ia.

<sc>Hygeia Dining Rooms</sc>, Fifty-eighth Street and Drexel Avenue,
Chicago, Ill.
#/



07 Lists 107-00A                 Updated  2011/04/19


LIST OF EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE, YEAR
ENDING JUNE 30, 1885. EXPORTED FROM THE
SEVEN CUSTOMS DISTRICTS OF THE PACIFIC.
[*** Heading is wrappable, not a Hanging Indent, and all-caps. No markups.]

[*** Enclose list in no-wrap. Put all the entries in one left-justified column.]
/*
Agricultural Implements.
Animals.
Art Works.
Bark, and Extract for Tanning.
Billiard Tables, etc.
Blacking.
Bones, Hoofs, Horns, etc.
Books, Maps, etc.
Brass, and Manufactures of.
Breadstuffs, Wheat, etc.
Bricks.
Broom-corn, Brooms and Brushes.[*** line rejoined]
Candles.
*/

[*** OVERVIEW OF LISTS:                                                                     ]
[*** Books sometimes print lists in columns. If the Proofers didn't change that to a single ]
[*** column, the Formatters should do it.  If there are multiple columns and they contain   ]
[*** different kinds of information, as shown in the next example, then it is a Table, not  ]
[*** a List, and the columns need to be preserved and aligned.  (See the "Tables" Category  ]
[*** for fancier examples.) Lists are not wrappable (the line breaks must be preserved), so ]
[*** enclose them in no-wrap markups.                                                       ]



07 Lists 107-01A                 Updated  2011/04/19

He gives the population of these countries
as follows:

/*
[*** A simple list, but actually a simple table needing aligned columns.]
[*** Remember to remove the dots if the Proofers didn't already do so.]
Siberia         4,000,000
Mongolia       12,000,000
Manchooria      5,000,000
Japan          36,000,000
               ----------
    Total      57,000,000[*** "Total" was indented, so indent it here.]
*/



07 Lists 107-02A                 Updated  2011/04/12




BOOKS IN THE "FAIRY SERIES"


[*** The line below the heading is]
[*** decorative, not a thought break.]
[*** This is a simple list.]
[*** Enclose in no-wrap and mark each]
[*** italicized entry separately.]
/*
<i>The English Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Welsh Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Irish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Scottish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Italian Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Hungarian Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Indian Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Spanish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Danish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Norwegian Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Jewish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Swedish Fairy Book</i>
<i>The Chinese Fairy Book</i>
*/



07 Lists 107-03A                 Updated  2016/05/09

[*** This could be formatted either as a list or as a Block Quote, so it's best to ASK   ]
[*** about it in the Project Discussion. If formatted as a list, the two items that wrap ]
[*** should be unwrapped, and the list can be single-spaced. If formatted as a Block     ]
[*** Quote (because two items are printed as hanging indents), the items must be         ]
[*** separated with blank lines. Either way, a NOTE probably is appropriate.             ]
[*** This example also appears in the "Block Quotes" category, formatted as a BQ.        ]

VEGETARIAN RESTAURANTS AND CAFES

/*
<sc>Vegetarian Cafe</sc>, 755 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal.
<sc>Vegetarian Restaurant</sc>, 44 San Pablo Avenue, Oakland, Cal.
<sc>Vegetarian Restaurant</sc>, 317 West Third Street, Los Angeles, Cal.
<sc>Good Health Restaurant</sc>, 616 Third Street, Seattle, Wash.
<sc>Vegetarian Restaurant</sc>, 283 Pitt Street, Sydney, N. S. W.
<sc>Vegetarian Restaurant</sc>, 54 Farrar Street, Detroit, Mich.
<sc>Vegetarian Restaurant</sc>, 607 Locust Street, Des Moines, Ia.
<sc>Hygeia Dining Rooms</sc>, Fifty-eighth Street and Drexel Avenue, Chicago, Ill.
*/



07 Lists 107-04A                 Updated  2016/05/09

/#[*** paragraph is indented and wrappable, so it's a Block Quote]
in addition to the works of the better-known writers, such as
Bolingbroke and Hume, after the period commonly marked as
that of the "decline of deism." In the list may be included a
few by Unitarians, who at this stage were doing critical work.
Like a number of the earlier works above mentioned, the following
(save Evanson) are overlooked in Sir Leslie Stephen's survey:--

/*[*** This is a two-column table. It can't be formatted as a simple list, because some of the entries are multi-line with ]
  [*** hanging indents, and the ditto marks must be associated with the dates. The mdash above it, and the extra space     ]
  [*** below it, confirm that it's part of the Block Quote. This example also appears in the "Tables" category.            ]
1746.  <i>Essay on Natural Religion.</i> Falsely attributed to Dryden.

  "    <i>Deism fairly stated and fully vindicated</i>, etc. Anon.

1750.  John Dove, <i>A Creed founded on Truth and Common Sense</i>.

  "    <i>The British Oracle.</i> (Two numbers only.)

1752.  <i>The Pillars of Priestcraft and Orthodoxy Shaken.</i> Four vols. of freethinking
         pamphlets, collected (and some written) by Thomas Gordon,
         formerly secretary to Trenchard. Edited by R. Barron. (Rep. 1768.)

1772.  E. Evanson, <i>The Doctrines of a Trinity and the Incarnation</i>, etc.

1773.  ---- <i>Three Discourses</i> (1. Upon the Man after God's own Heart; 2. Upon
         the Faith of Abraham; 3. Upon the Seal of the Foundation of God).
*/
#/

Of the work here noted a considerable amount was done by[*** paragraph is not indented, so Block Quote ended above]
Unitarians, Evanson being of that persuasion, though at the time



08 Chapters 108-00A                 Updated  2011/04/19




CHAPTER II.[*** 4 blank lines above new chapter]

<i>DOWN THE ATHABASCA.</i>[*** part of Chapter heading: separate parts with 1 blank line]
[*** 2 blank lines between Chapter heading and body of text.]


[*** The first word of this Chapter is in small-caps. Change it to normal mixed-case.]
The town of Athabasca Landing consists in all of six
log buildings, picturesquely set in the deep and beautiful
valley of one of the greatest rivers of America.

[*** OVERIEW OF "CHAPTERS"                                                          ]
[*** In a printed book, Chapters usually start on a new page, as do Title Pages,    ]
[*** dedications, Tables of Contents, Indexes, and other "Major Divisions."  Often, ]
[*** a Chapter heading contains more than one part (the example above has 2 parts). ]
[*** We mark those Major Divisions by preceding them with 4 blank lines, separating ]
[*** the parts within the heading with one blank line, and separating the headings  ]
[*** from the regular text with two blank lines.                                    ]
[*** If the first word of a Chapter appears to be in small caps or all upper-case,  ]
[*** change it to match the rest of the paragraph (usually normal mixed-case), and  ]
[*** do not mark it at all. Exception: if it's a Name in small-caps, and names are  ]
[*** in small-caps elsewhere in the book's normal text, then mark it as small-caps. ]



08 Chapters 108-01A                 Updated  2011/04/13




CHAPTER II[*** All upper-case. Do not mark it.]

<sc>Tools and Appliances</sc>
[*** Mixed small-caps. Mark it.]

[*** All upper-case. Do not mark it.]
TOOL LISTS AND COSTS--LAYING OUT AND MARKING
OFF THE WORK--SHOP APPLIANCES
[*** This chapter's heading has 3 parts. Separate them with 1 blank line and]
[*** separate the heading from the regular text with 2 blank lines.]


In this chapter the names and approximate costs
of the tools and appliances are given and also suggestions
as to fitting up the shop for working with
the cans. Various methods are suggested for laying
out the work with the ruler, square and dividers.



08 Chapters 108-02A                 Updated  2011/04/19




CHAPTER 6

PSYCHIC INCOME[*** last part of Chapter heading; follow with 2 blank lines.]


§ I. INCOME AS A FLOW OF GOODS[*** Section heading. Precede with 2 blank lines,]
[*** follow with 1 blank line. NOT small-caps, just all upper-case.]
[*** The same 2 blank lines satisfy both requirements; they're not cumulative.]
[*** Is that an "I" or a "1"? The only way to find out is to look at Section]
[*** headings on other pages. The next Section heading uses "II" so this is an "I"]

[Sidenote: The recurrence
of
wants][*** NOT boldface.]

1.[*** Not boldface.] <i>Satisfaction and gratification being only temporary
conditions, economic wants appear in more or less regularly
recurring series.</i> Impressions are short lived, sensations are



08 Chapters 108-03A                 Updated  2018/12/31




CHAPTER III.

EARLY ATTEMPTS ON THE AIGUILLE DU DRU[*** All upper-case, NOT small-caps.                  ]

/#[*** Use Block Quote tags around the paragraph because of the hanging indent.            ]
[*** This overview is part of the Chapter heading, so precede it with just one blank line. ]
The Alps and the early mountaineers--The last peaks to surrender--The
Aiguille du Dru--Messrs. Kennedy and Pendlebury's attempt
on the peak--One-day expeditions in the Alps and thoughts
on huts and sleeping out--The Chamouni guide system--A word
on guides, past and present--The somnolent landlord and his
peculiarities--Some of the party see a chamois--Doubts as to
the peak and the way--The duplicity of the Aiguille deceives us--Telescopic
observations--An ill-arranged glacier--Franz and
his mighty axe--A start on the rocks in the wrong direction--Progress
reported--An adjournment--The rocks of the lower
peak of the Aiguille du Dru--Our first failure--The expedition
resumed--A new line of ascent--We reach the sticking point--Beaten
back--The results gained by the two days' climbing.
#/[*** Precede start of regular text with 2 blank lines.]


[*** We don't use small-caps for the first words in the body of a Chapter or a Section.    ]
Accounts of failures on the mountains in books of
Alpine adventure are as much out of place, according
to some critics, as a new hat in a crowded church.



08 Chapters 108-03A1                 Updated  2017/06/11




CHAPTER III.

EARLY ATTEMPTS ON THE AIGUILLE DU DRU[*** All upper-case, NOT small-caps]

/#[*** Hanging Indent: use a Block Quote.]
[*** This overview is part of the Chapter heading, so precede it with just one blank line.]
The Alps and the early mountaineers--The last peaks to surrender--The
Aiguille du Dru--Messrs. Kennedy and Pendlebury's attempt
on the peak--One-day expeditions in the Alps and thoughts
on huts and sleeping out--The Chamouni guide system--A word
on guides, past and present--The somnolent landlord and his
peculiarities--Some of the party see a chamois--Doubts as to
the peak and the way--The duplicity of the Aiguille deceives us--Telescopic
observations--An ill-arranged glacier--Franz and
his mighty axe--A start on the rocks in the wrong direction--Progress
reported--An adjournment--The rocks of the lower
peak of the Aiguille du Dru--Our first failure--The expedition
resumed--A new line of ascent--We reach the sticking point--Beaten
back--The results gained by the two days' climbing.
#/[*** Precede start of regular text with 2 blank lines.]


[*** We don't use small-caps for the first words in the body of a Chapter or a Section.]
Accounts of failures on the mountains in books of
Alpine adventure are as much out of place, according
to some critics, as a new hat in a crowded church.



08 Chapters 108-04A                 Updated  2011/04/13




Part First[*** 4 blank lines above Major Division.]




CHAPTER I[*** 4 blank lines above new Chapter.]

RISOTTO AND TRUFFLES[*** part of Chapter heading, separated by 1 blank line.]
[*** 2 blank lines between Chapter heading and text.]


On the lake a cold <i>breva</i>[A] was blowing, striving
to drive away the grey clouds which clung
heavily about the dark mountain-tops. Indeed,



08 Chapters 108-05A                 Updated  2011/04/30




A HISTORY OF ROME TO 565 A.D.[*** Book Title is Major Division: 4 blank lines.]
[*** "A.D." is shown in normal upper-case, not in small-caps.]




CHAPTER I[*** And another 4 blank lines to mark actual Chapter.]

THE GEOGRAPHY OF ITALY[*** not bold, not small-caps, just all upper-case.]
[*** Finally, 2 blank lines to mark start of text.]


Italy, ribbed by the Apennines, girdled by the Alps and the sea,
juts out like a "long pier-head" from Europe towards the northern
coast of Africa. It includes two regions of widely differing physical
characteristics: the northern, continental; the southern, peninsular.



08 Chapters 108-06A                 Updated  2011/03/04




ASTRONOMICAL DISCOVERY




CHAPTER I

URANUS AND EROS


[Sidenote: Popular
view of
discovery.][*** goes with text body.]

Discovery is expected from an astronomer. The
lay mind scarcely thinks of a naturalist nowadays
discovering new animals, or of a chemist as finding
new elements save on rare occasions; but it



08 Chapters 108-07A                 Updated  2011/04/13

[*** Major Division: 4 blank lines.]




PART I

THE FORERUNNERS OF ROME IN ITALY
[*** Don't enclose in no-wrap:]
[*** it's like a heading above text.]
[*** The Chapter on next page (not shown]
[*** in these examples) also will be]
[*** marked with 4 blank lines.]



08 Chapters 108-08A                 Updated  2011/03/04




KING COLE

[Illustration][*** part of chapter heading.]


/*
King Cole was King before the troubles came,
The land was happy while he held the helm,
The valley-land from Condicote to Thame,
Watered by Thames and green with many an elm.
For many a year he governed well his realm,
So well-beloved, that, when at last he died,
It was bereavement to the countryside.
*/



08 Chapters 108-09A                 Updated  2013/05/31

[*** Illustration above Chapter heading.                   ]
[*** This one also is above the Book title.                ]
[*** Some, but not all, Post-Processors prefer four blank  ]
[*** lines above an illustration that is just above a      ]
[*** Chapter heading. (There always should be four blank   ]
[*** lines above the heading itself.)                      ]
[*** Since this is not covered in the Guidelines, if it    ]
[*** isn't covered in the Project Comments or Discussion,  ]
[*** "ASK" about it.                                       ]




[*** This example used four blank lines above the Illo.    ]
[Illustration: <sc>Pigmy Pugilists--from Pompeii.</sc>]




[*** Four blank lines above Book Title.                    ]
CARICATURE AND COMIC ART.
[*** The horizontal rule is decorative, not a thought break]




[*** And four blank lines above Chapter heading.           ]
CHAPTER I.

AMONG THE ROMANS.[*** Part of Chapter heading: one blank   ]
[*** line. Then, 2 blank lines to indicate body of text.   ]


Much as the ancients differed from ourselves in other particulars, they certainly
laughed at one another just as we do, for precisely the same reasons,
and employed every art, device, and implement of
ridicule which is known to us.[*** cropped to fit screen   ]

[Illustration][*** Move to a paragraph break.              ]

Observe this rude and childish attempt at a drawing.
Go into any boys' school to-day, and turn over the slates



08 Chapters 108-10A                 Updated  2011/04/13




PART II.[*** Major Division: 4 blank lines.]

MYTHOLOGY AND FOLK-LORE.[*** The Title of that Major Division.]
[*** "INTRODUCTORY" is the first Chapter in the Part, so use (another) 4 blank lines.]
[*** How do we know this? Check the Table of Contents to confirm structure.]
[*** And ignore the horizontal lines; they are decorative, not thought breaks.]




INTRODUCTORY.


Fashions in the study of mythology come and go with
something like the rapidity of change in costume feminine,
subject to the autocracy of a Parisian man-modiste.



08 Chapters 108-11A                 Updated  2013/11/10




CHAPTER III.

HOW G, B AND K COMPANIES WENT TO SOUTH FRAMINGHAM.


While the naval militiamen of Springfield were being
sent off to their places of duty amid the
cheers of the people plans for the mobilization of
the land forces of the state were going on apace.
The call of President McKinley for troops was issued on
April 23 and six days later on April 29, Col. Embury P.
Clark of the Second Regiment of Infantry, M. V. M., was
[*** Treat an illustrated drop-cap or a regular drop-cap ]
[*** like a plain, capitalized letter. Don't indicate it ]
[*** with an [Illustration] tag, and make sure the first ]
[*** word in the body of a chapter is in normal          ]
[*** mixed-case, not in small-caps or all-caps.          ]
[***                                                     ]
[*** Some projects may request other ways of marking     ]
[*** illustrated letters; if they don't, and you're not  ]
[*** sure what to do, "ASK." If you don't receive an     ]
[*** answer, the explanation here follows the guidelines.]



08 Chapters 108-12A                 Updated  2014/07/09




CHAPTER III.

LIFE IN THE OCEAN.

/*
"See what a lovely shell, small and pure as a pearl,
Frail, but a work divine, made so fairly well,
With delicate spore and whorl, a miracle of design."
 
<sc>Tennyson.</sc>
*/
[*** The attribution ("Tennyson") raises two questions: 1) should it be moved to a separate   ]
[*** line, preceded by a blank line, or remain on the same line as the verse, preceded by     ]
[*** six spaces; and 2) if moved to a separate line, should it be enclosed in a separate pair ]
[*** of no-wraps or remain in the same no-wraps as the verse? If the Project Comments and     ]
[*** Discussion do not provide guidance, it's best to ask what is preferred.                  ]
[*** Ignore a stanza's leading quotation mark when indenting its other lines. (Don't indent   ]
[*** them by an extra space.)                                                                 ]
[*** (This example also appears in the "Poetry" Category.)                                    ]


"The appearance of the open sea," says Frédol, from whose elegant
work this chapter is chiefly compiled, "far from the shore--the
boundless ocean--is to the man who loves to create a world of his



08 Chapters 108-13A                 Updated  2017/06/11




<sc>The Things Seen and the Things
Not Seen.</sc>

PREACHED IN CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL,
EASTER DAY, 1915.

/#[*** This paragraph should be marked as a Block Quote, because it is in quotation marks. ]
  [*** Otherwise, it would not be marked, because it looks like a normal paragraph.        ]
"<i>For which cause we faint not; but though our outward
man perish, yet the inward man is renewed day by
day. For our light affliction, which is but for a moment,
worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight
of glory; while we look not at the things which are seen,
but at the things which are not seen: for the things which
are seen are temporal; but the things which are not
seen are eternal.</i>"--2 Cor. iv. 16.
#/


These touching words of St. Paul are
based upon the grand truth to which
Easter Day is a standing witness. "Therefore,"
he says, or "for which cause, we



09 Sections 109-00A                 Updated  2014/02/23

/#
and as there was nothing more to come back for, flew straight
off to its nest, without taking any further note of the locality.
Such an action is not the result of blind instinct, but of a
thinking mind; and it is wonderful to see an insect so differently
constructed using a mental process similar to that of
man.
#/


<i>Memory.</i>[*** Classic example of a new Section: extra white space around centered heading]

We may here first allude to an observation of Sir
John Lubbock already quoted in another connexion (see
p. 147). It is here evident that the wasp, after finding
the store of honey in the room, and after finding
the window closed in the 'wasp-line' direction to its nest,

[*** OVERVIEW OF "SECTIONS"                                                                       ]
[*** "Sections" are minor divisions within chapters. Usually, they are not listed in the Table of ]
[*** Contents (but sometimes they are). Usually, they begin with a centered heading that is       ]
[*** surrounded by additional white space. However, sometimes there's no separate heading, but    ]
[*** an in-line heading following white space; and sometimes not even that.  These variations can ]
[*** make it difficult to distinguish between a new Section and a Thought Break.                  ]
[*** Precede a Section or a sub-section with two blank lines unless the Project Comments specify  ]
[*** otherwise, or ASK about sub-sections if they're not in the Comments. If the section has a    ]
[*** heading (most do), follow that heading with one blank line.                                  ]



09 Sections 109-02A                 Updated  2011/03/05




CHAPTER 6

PSYCHIC INCOME[*** part of Chapter heading]


§ I. INCOME AS A FLOW OF GOODS[*** Section heading]
[*** Precede with 2 blank lines. NOT small-caps.]

[Sidenote: The recurrence
of
wants]

1. <i>Satisfaction and gratification being only temporary
conditions, economic wants appear in more or less regularly
recurring series.</i> Impressions are short lived, sensations are
temporary, wants that have been satisfied recur. Wants recur



09 Sections 109-03A                 Updated  2011/04/18

or not the belief is well grounded. With the claims which any
proposition has to belief on the evidence of consciousness, that
is, without evidence in the proper sense of the word, logic has
nothing to do.


[*** The white space and the Section symbol (§) are pretty good hints that this is a new Section.]
§ 5. By far the greatest portion of our knowledge,
whether of general truths or of particular facts, being avowedly
matter of inference, nearly the whole, not only of science, but
of human conduct, is amenable to the authority of logic. To



09 Sections 109-04A                 Updated  2015/07/07

the volumes of to-day with primeval records, to
present to the reader a few of the many points
of interest offered by the modern history of the
<i>printed</i> book.


[*** This paragraph begins with a bolded, inline heading. Tag the bolded text,   ]
[*** as it's on the same line as 'normal' text. Since there is extra white space ]
[*** above the paragraph, check the TOC for a list of sections within chapters.  ]
[*** If the TOC shows that the bolded words are a section header, put two blank  ]
[*** lines above the paragraph. If the TOC doesn't list sections, ask in the     ]
[*** Project Discussion how the inline heading should be handled.                ]
<b>The Beginning of Writing.</b>--Books began with
writing, and writing began at the time when man
first bethought himself to make records, so that
the progenitor of the beautiful handwriting and no



09 Sections 109-05A                 Updated  2013/05/13

The epithelium often takes some time to regenerate. As a rule the results
are satisfactory, although the film is apt to recur in the course of years,
but it may be removed again if necessary.


OPERATIONS UPON THE CONJUNCTIVA[*** New Section: precede with 2 blank lines.]


THE REMOVAL OF FOREIGN BODIES[*** Sub-Section: precede sub-Section headings with 2      ]
[*** blank lines unless the Project Comments specify otherwise. Some Post-Processors    ]
[*** may prefer one blank line, so if it isn't covered, ASK; particularly in cases like ]
[*** this one, where they immediately follow a higher-level Section heading.            ]
[***                                                                                    ]
[*** So, how do you know whether something is a Section or a sub-Section? The Project   ]
[*** Comments or Discussion may describe the hierarchy.  If not, check the Table of     ]
[*** Contents: if the heading is listed there, and isn't a Chapter heading, it's a      ]
[*** Section heading; but many ToC's don't list Sections. Next, look at preceding pages ]
[*** to see how the other Section / sub-Section headings look in comparison to this     ]
[*** one. (To see earlier pages, go to the Project page, click the link next to "Page   ]
[*** Detail," then click your page in the "Image" column and use the "Prev" button.)    ]

Foreign bodies lodged in the conjunctival sac, unless embedded in the
conjunctiva, are usually found by the surgeon under the upper lid, the
sulcus subtarsalis being a favourite situation. They are easily removed
with a spud or needle, after the instillation of a drop of 4% cocaine



09 Sections 109-06A                 Updated  2011/04/30

/*
<i>Lov.</i> Nor shall they trouble you much longer,
A little time shall shew you they were groundless;
This Winter shall be the fiery Trial of my Virtue;
Which, when it once has past,
You'll be convinc'd 'twas of no false Allay,
There all your Cares will end----

<i>Aman.</i> Pray Heaven they may!
*/


SCENE, <i>Whitehall</i>.[*** "Scenes" normally are treated as new Sections.]
 
<i>Enter</i> Young Fashion, Lory, <i>and</i> Waterman.

/*
<i>Young Fash.</i> Come, pay the Waterman, and take the Pormanteau.

<i>Lory.</i> Faith, Sir, I think the Waterman had as good
take the Portmanteau, and pay himself.
*/



09 Sections 109-07A                 Updated  2011/04/21

[*** This is at the top of the page, so it isn't obvious whether it's a new Section      ]
[*** or just a new paragraph. In such cases, look for similar pages. (On the Project     ]
[*** page, click "Images, Pages Proofed, & Differences" then find the page you're        ]
[*** formatting, click on a nearby ".png" to see an image, and use the "Prev" / "Next"   ]
[*** buttons until you find a similar page.) Elsewhere in the book containing this page, ]
[*** when "References" begins mid-page, it's preceded by extra white space, so this is a ]
[*** new Section, needing 2 blank lines. Also, the "References" Section is in            ]
[*** smaller type, so it needs to be enclosed in Block Quotes. (You can't tell that from ]
[*** this cropped example, only by seeing entire pages.)                                 ]


/#
<b>References.</b>--<sc>Beard</sc>, American Government and Politics, chs. xxii-xxiii.
<sc>Bryce</sc>, The American Commonwealth (abridged edition),
chs. xxxiv-xxxv. <sc>Dealey</sc>, Our State Constitutions, chs. ii-iii. <sc>Hart</sc>,
Actual Government, ch. vi. <sc>Hinsdale</sc>, The American Government,
#/



09 Sections 109-08A                 Updated  2014/03/13

Such monuments will educate our young men in
heroic virtue, and keep alive to future ages the flame
of patriotism. And thus, too, to the aching heart of
bereaved love shall be given the only consolation of
which its sorrows admit, in the reverence which is paid
to its lost loved ones.


THE END.[*** Precede this with 2 blank lines. ]


Cambridge: Stereotyped and Printed by Welch, Bigelow, & Co.[*** Precede this with 2 blank lines. ]
[*** These don't fit into any of our standard categories. They are not simply new paragraphs,    ]
[*** and aren't Major Divisions, so just precede them with 2 blank lines and do not enclose them ]
[*** in no-wraps or block quotes.                                                                ]



10 Thought_Breaks 110-00A                 Updated  2011/07/28

which thing came true in 1603, when King James, son of
Mary, Queen of Scots, became Monarch of both countries.

<tb>
[*** A row of asterisks, surrounded by white space. A classic example of a]
[*** Thought Break. Leave one blank line on each side of the tag.]

Fourteen long years went by, and people were beginning
to forget that Thomas the Rhymer had ever been
in fairyland; but at last a day came when Scotland was
at war with England, and the Scottish army was resting

[*** OVERVIEW OF THOUGHT BREAKS:                                                          ]
[*** To quote from the Formatting Guidelines: "Sometimes two paragraphs are separated     ]
[*** to indicate a 'thought break.' A thought break may take the form of a line of stars, ]
[*** hyphens, or some other character, a plain or floridly decorated horizontal line,     ]
[*** a simple decoration, or even just an extra blank line or two.  A thought break       ]
[*** may represent a change of scene or subject, a lapse in time, or a bit of suspense."  ]
[*** Thought breaks are challenging to detect when the only clue is additional white      ]
[*** space: is it a thought break, a new Section, a Block Quote, or just in a book that   ]
[*** separated every paragraph with a blank line? Usually, the answer is obvious, but     ]
[*** sometimes you will need to make a "judgement call."                                  ]
[*** Also, remember that horizontal lines sometimes are just decorative, not <tb>'s.      ]
[*** This is particularly true in "Front Matter" (e.g., Title pages) and Advertisements.  ]



10 Thought_Breaks 110-02A                 Updated  2012/05/11

The system was first introduced in 1897, in the
translation of <i>John Gabriel Borkman</i>. It has no
longer even the disadvantage of unfamiliarity,
since it has been adopted by Mr. Bernard Shaw
in his printed plays, and, I believe, by other
dramatists.

<tb>
[*** The combination of extra white space and change of subject makes this a thought]
[*** break. It isn't a new Section.]

Just thirty years have passed since I first put
pen to paper in a translation of Ibsen. In October
1877, <i>Pillars of Society</i> reached me hot from the
press; and, having devoured it, I dashed off a
translation of it in less than a week. It has since



10 Thought_Breaks 110-03A                 Updated  2011/04/18

When a few players are curling for practice,
or recreation, some of the above laws may not
be rigidly enforced; but any relaxation should
always be noticed, so that there may be no
difficulty in strictly adhering to them when
playing a Bonspiel, or set game.

<tb>
[*** A classic example of a Thought Break: a short horizontal rule, extra white space,]
[*** and a temporal change.]

The preceding account has been, as far as
practicable, divested of technical terms, in
order that it might be the more intelligible
to the uninitiated. Many of the words and



10 Thought_Breaks 110-04A                 Updated  2011/07/28

Walker, infinitely tired, forgot his
coffee and began to tidy up the
desk, filing everything he wanted to
keep in an electronically locked
cabinet, shoving everything else into
the destruction of the vibrator. He
pondered for a moment the powdered
secrets that were heaped like
black dust in the bottom of the canister:
a symbol of safety to a terrified world.

Step one: find Millet. <i>Find Millet.</i>

<tb>
[*** The white space means it's some kind]
[*** of Break. This is from a Science Fiction]
[*** magazine, a genre that used LOTS of]
[*** Thought Breaks at the time, and Project]
[*** Comments specified treating these as]
[*** such. In other genres, it could be]
[*** either a Section or a Thought Break.]

It took the Secret Service
exactly twenty-nine hours to locate
Dr. Otto Millet. Thirty minutes
later, Walker was climbing out
of a government helicopter and
staring at Millet's small house
through squinted eyes which he
shielded with both hands against
the blazing desert sun. The house



10 Thought_Breaks 110-05A                 Updated  2011/04/18

Each new disclosure verified the suspicions of the public as to
the magnitude of these abuses. The necessity of a special
corrective was first applied to rebating; but this action in turn
only served to reënforce the popular conviction that more
general legislation was necessary. The Elkins amendments
of 1903 surely paved the way for the Hepburn law three years
thereafter.

<tb>
[*** In some cases, the white space could mean a Section break, even without a heading;]
[*** but here, the two paragraphs are discussing different aspects of the same topic, so]
[*** this is a Thought break.]

The so-called Elkins amendments to the Act of 1887,--the
first changes of importance in its substantive clauses,--were
made in 1903, in response to a demand of the carriers



10 Thought_Breaks 110-06A                 Updated  2013/04/05

do not pass this score are called "hogs" and
lose for that time the chance of counting,
being distanced or thrown off the rink.

<tb>
[*** Is it a Thought Break or a new Section?                                                ]
[*** Usually, it's just a Thought Break, as Sections normally have headings on lines of     ]
[*** their own, and often are listed in the Table of Contents. Here, "PLAYING" looks like   ]
[*** an in-line sub-Section heading. (This project's Comments said to use Thought Breaks    ]
[*** wherever there were short horizontal lines.)                                           ]

<sc>Playing.</sc>--When the player is about to
throw his stones, he places himself at one end
of the rink, rests his right foot in a notch, or



10 Thought_Breaks 110-07A                 Updated  2011/03/05

[*** There are blank lines between all of the]
[*** paragraphs in this book, so they're not]
[*** Thought Breaks, and not Section breaks.]
Years: He became very eminent for his
Poetry, to which he discovered an early propension.
And, pity it is, that this agreeable
Writer had not discovered his Wit, without
any Mixture of that Licentiousness, which,
tho' it pleased, tended to corrupt the Audience.

<i>The Relapse</i> was the first Play our Author
produced, but not the first he had written;
for he had at that Time by him, all the Scenes
of <i>The Provok'd Wife</i>; but being then doubtful
whether he should ever trust it to the
Stage, he flung it by, and thought no more
of it: Why the last written Play was first acted,
and for what Reason they were given to different
Stages, what follows will explain.

Upon our Author's first Step into public
Life, when he was but an Ensign in the
Army, and had a Heart greatly above his
Income, he happened somewhere at his Winter
Quarters, upon a slender Acquaintance
with Sir <i>Thomas Skipwith</i>, to receive a particular
Obligation from him; and many Years
afterwards, when Sir <i>Thomas</i>'s Interest in a
Theatrical Patent (which he had a large
Share in, though he little concerned himself
in the Conduct of it) was rising but very
slowly, Sir <i>John</i> thought that to give it a lift
by a new Comedy, might be the handsomest



11 Illustrations 111-00A                 Updated  2013/11/30

[Illustration: THE RENDEZVOUS.

/*
<sc>Frontispiece</sc>--Victor Hugo, Vol. XXI., p. 154.
*/
]
[*** This is a full-page Illustration, so it goes at the top of the page. A blank line above it   ]
[*** is OPTIONAL, unless the Project Comments require or prohibit one.                            ]
[*** We don't enclose a centered caption in no-wraps, but we do use no-wraps when text is         ]
[*** right-justified, so enclose the Attribution line in no-wraps. A blank line above the         ]
[*** opening no-wrap is required, but no blank line is needed between the closing no-wrap and     ]
[*** the closing bracket of the Illustration. However, they must be on separate lines.            ]

[*** OVERVIEW OF ILLUSTRATIONS:                                                                   ]
[*** An Illustration may be on a page of its own (as shown in this example), or may share a page  ]
[*** with text. If it has a caption and/or other associated text, highlight all of that and click ]
[*** the [Illustration] button (always use the buttons; it's too easy to make mistakes if you     ]
[*** type the tags yourself) to place the selection inside the generated brackets, after the      ]
[*** colon and space. Format the caption and any text as though they were not in an Illustration. ]
[*** A full-page illustration's tag begins on the first line of an otherwise blank page. A blank  ]
[*** line above the tag is optional, unless the Project Comments state a preference.              ]
[*** Illustrations, like Sidenotes and Footnotes, must be placed "out-of-line," that is, between  ]
[*** paragraphs. So, if there's also regular text on the page, move the Illustration tag and its  ]
[*** information between paragraphs, preceded and followed by a blank line. Paragraph breaks may  ]
[*** occur at the top or bottom of a page; if at the very bottom, omit the trailing blank line.   ]
[*** If there are no paragraph breaks, move the tag and its content to the very top of the page,  ]
[*** with an asterisk to its left and a blank line below it. If there are several illustrations   ]
[*** on the page, each one needs the asterisk and the trailing blank line.                        ]



11 Illustrations 111-01A                 Updated  2013/11/30

[Illustration: A WALRUS HERD.]
[*** Full-page illustration. A blank line above the tag is OPTIONAL unless the Project Comments ]
[*** express a preference.                                                                      ]
[*** Enclose the caption and any associated descriptive text within the tags.                   ]
[*** This caption is all upper-case. Not small-caps, not bold, not block quote, not no-wrap.    ]



11 Illustrations 111-02A                 Updated  2011/05/04

[*** Full-page illustration goes at the top of the otherwise blank page. A blank line above it is]
[*** OPTIONAL, unless covered in the Project Comments.]
[*** The caption has two parts. Separate them with a blank line. Both seem to be wrappable.]
[Illustration: <sc>Concentrator Division, Washoe Reduction Works of the Anaconda Copper Mining Co.,
Anaconda, Montana.</sc>
 
Largest Copper Works in the World.]



11 Illustrations 111-03A                 Updated  2013/11/30

 
[Illustration: Shaft No. 3, <sc>Tamarack Mining Company, Calumet,
Michigan</sc>.]
 
[Illustration: <sc>Smeltery of the Balaklala Consolidated Copper Co.,
Coram, California.</sc>]
[*** Two illustrations. Format them separately.                                                ]
[*** The blank line at the top of the page is OPTIONAL, unless the Project Comments express a  ]
[*** preference.                                                                               ]
[*** Top: only part of the caption is in small-caps, so note which punctuation marks go INSIDE ]
[***      and which go OUTSIDE the in-line markups.                                            ]
[*** Bottom: the entire sentence is in small-caps, so all punctuation goes INSIDE.             ]
[*** Both captions are wrappable: in the first one, the City name fit on the first line;       ]
[*** in the second one, it didn't.                                                             ]
[*** And, there's no boldface on this page.                                                    ]



11 Illustrations 111-04A                 Updated  2011/05/04

a journey and the almost certain hardships which must
attend it, could not have been of the most pleasant
character.

[Illustration: ESKIMOS AT RED CLIFF HOUSE.][*** Move to a paragraph break if there is one.]

Meanwhile the first happy hours of meeting were
enjoyed by the relief party and the three remaining
members of the Peary expedition at the headquarters.
They looked through the cozy little Red Cliff House--as
the Arctic mansion was called from the color of the
cliffs near Cape Cleveland--and they wandered about



11 Illustrations 111-05A                 Updated  2011/04/13


SPECIAL QUOTATIONS

<b>6.</b> Every purchasing agent receives, in addition to published
price lists, many special quotations on material and supplies in which
he is interested. Very frequently quotations are received at a time
when he is not in the market for the particular material offered, but
they are nevertheless of value for possible future use, and should be
carefully preserved.

[Illustration: Fig. 3. Card Form for Special Quotations][*** move to a paragraph break]

One method of handling special quotations is to set aside a special
file, or a drawer, or a section of the regular file, to be used exclusively



11 Illustrations 111-06A                 Updated  2013/05/20

icebergs on their silent march in single file towards Melville
Bay. These bergs were of all sizes, and no two
alike save for their whiteness and their grandeur.

[*** Move to a paragraph break if there is one.   ]
[*** Since there's no caption, the tag should NOT ]
[*** have a colon or trailing space, and the      ]
[*** button will do this properly for you.        ]
[Illustration]

Eric the Red, wild, old heathen that he was, did not
depart far from the truth, when a thousand years ago
he called the country Greenland; the native green of
the great basalt cliffs of Disko Island is heightened and
made brilliant by patches of bright green moss and grass,
and the verdure of creeping willows. About five o'clock
the propeller of the <i>Kite</i> ceased revolving, and, to the



11 Illustrations 111-07A                 Updated  2014/10/17

as they do also in the lizard. The second pair become on
the right side (left of
the diagram) the aortic
arch, on the left side
(right of the diagram)
the left subclavian, <i>s'c'</i>
(the right subclavian,
<i>sc</i>, is a branch of the
aortic arch). The third
pair become carotids,
<i>cc</i>, while the fourth and
fifth, as already said, are
aborted. In the mammal
(Fig. 43), on the left
side (right of the diagram)
the first arch becomes
the pulmonary
artery, <i>p</i>. In the f[oe]tus the continuation of this arch
forms the ductus arteriosus, which is afterward obliterated,
as shown in the dotted line. The second arch becomes
the aortic arch, the third the left exterior carotid.
On the right side (left of the diagram) the first arch
becomes aborted; the second, the right subclavian, <i>sc</i>
(the <i>left</i> subclavian, <i>s'c'</i>, is a branch of the aortic arch);
and the third, the right carotid. Nos. 4 and 5, on both
sides, as usual, are aborted.

[Illustration: <sc>Fig. 43.</sc>--Modified for mammal.]
[*** Move illustrations to a paragraph break, if there is one.  ]
[*** This page has a paragraph break at the bottom, and that's  ]
[*** a valid location for an illustration (if there's a         ]
[*** paragraph break there).                                    ]
[***                                                            ]
[*** Include the number and period in the small-caps. The       ]
[*** illustration's identification is "Fig. 43.", NOT "Fig."    ]
[***                                                            ]
[*** If "Fig." is in small-caps (or italics), include the       ]
[*** number and period in the small-caps (or italics) tag. If   ]
[*** the caption also is in small-caps, it is acceptable to use ]
[*** just one set of tags to enclose "Fig. nn. Caption text."   ]



11 Illustrations 111-08A                 Updated  2011/03/05

*[Illustration: SVARTEN HUK.]
[*** If there is no paragraph break on the page,]
[*** move to top of page and precede with an asterisk.]
[*** No blank line above it, one blank line between]
[*** illustration and page's text. If there are several]
[*** illustrations, move ALL of them to top, precede]
[*** each of them with an asterisk, and leave a blank]
[*** line between each of them.]

Ittiblus appeared, if anything, more joyful at the approach
of the ship than those of Cape York, and
swarmed about the "oomiakswa," as they call large
vessels, with incessant cries of "Ki-mo! Ki-mo!" (welcome!
welcome!) Far wilder in dress and appearance
than the natives at Cape York, they were yet the same
filthy, good-natured huskies, that clambered over the
ship's side and stood upon the deck, chattering like parrots
and laughing at everything in sight, including the
members' own precious persons. Those of the party
who suffered the most in this particular were the unfortunates
who were compelled to wear glasses, and later,



11 Illustrations 111-09A                 Updated  2014/08/13

[*** This has one caption, so it's one illustration. It's already at the top of the page, and the ]
[*** page begins with a new paragraph, so leave one blank line above and below it, and no asterisk]
 
[Illustration: <sc>Fig. 2.</sc> <i>Synaptotylus newelli</i> (Hibbard). Restoration
of the parasphenoid, based on K. U. nos. 9939, 11451,
× 5. A, ventral view, B, dorsal view and cross
sections.]
 
The parasphenoid (see fig. 2) is a shovel-shaped bone having a
wide anterior portion and a narrower posterior portion of nearly
uniform width. Most of the ventral surface is covered with minute
granular teeth. The anterior margin is flared and curved posteromedially
from the lateral margin to a median triangular projection.
[*** Include the number and period in the small-caps. If "Fig." is in italics, include the number ]
[*** and period in the italics tag, too, unless the Project Comments or Discussion say otherwise. ]



11 Illustrations 111-10A                 Updated  2014/07/21

[Illustration: <i>HENRY VIII.</i>[** This is the caption for the illustration on next page.]
 
<i>From a portrait by</i> <sc>Jost Van Cleef</sc> <i>in the Royal Collection at
Hampton Court Palace</i>]
[*** Both the main caption and the sub-caption are centered, and we do not indicate centering. ]
[*** We do indicate italics and small caps, so both are tagged.                                ]
[***                                                                                           ]
[*** The actual illustration is shown in the next example, with a simple [Illustration] tag,   ]
[*** so there will be two tags for one illustration.  Why?  Because it will make it easier     ]
[*** for the Post-Processor: the second tag simply will be deleted, but in the _Plain Text_    ]
[*** version, this tag, with its useful caption, will be ready for immediate use.  In the HTML ]
[*** version, each actual picture has to be added anyway, so Henry's picture can just go here. ]
[*** So why mark the actual picture at all?  For consistency: we always tag illustrations,     ]
[*** and you have to do SOMETHING with the page; you can't just pretend it isn't there.        ]



11 Illustrations 111-11A                 Updated  2013/04/05

 
[Illustration][** Caption on preceding page.]
[*** And here's the illustration. Don't copy the caption, but it wouldn't hurt to leave a note. ]
[*** The blank line above the tag is OPTIONAL (but highly recommended), unless a preference is  ]
[*** given in the Project Comments or Project Discussion.                                       ]



11 Illustrations 111-12A                 Updated  2013/05/31

[*** Illustration above Chapter heading.                   ]
[*** This one also is above the Book title.                ]
[*** Some, but not all, Post-Processors prefer four blank  ]
[*** lines above an illustration that is just above a      ]
[*** Chapter heading. (There always should be four blank   ]
[*** lines above the heading itself.)                      ]
[*** Since this is not covered in the Guidelines, if it    ]
[*** isn't covered in the Project Comments or Discussion,  ]
[*** "ASK" about it.                                       ]




[*** This example used four blank lines above the Illo.    ]
[Illustration: <sc>Pigmy Pugilists--from Pompeii.</sc>]




[*** Four blank lines above Book Title.                    ]
CARICATURE AND COMIC ART.
[*** The horizontal rule is decorative, not a thought break]




[*** And four blank lines above Chapter heading.           ]
CHAPTER I.

AMONG THE ROMANS.[*** Part of Chapter heading: one blank   ]
[*** line. Then, 2 blank lines to indicate body of text.   ]


Much as the ancients differed from ourselves in other particulars, they certainly
laughed at one another just as we do, for precisely the same reasons,
and employed every art, device, and implement of
ridicule which is known to us.[*** Text cropped to screen. ]

[Illustration][*** Move to a paragraph break.              ]

Observe this rude and childish attempt at a drawing.
Go into any boys' school to-day, and turn over the slates
and copy-books, or visit an inclosure where men are
obliged to pass idle days, and you will be likely to find
pictures conceived in this taste, and executed with this
degree of artistic skill. But the drawing dates back nearly
eighteen centuries. It was done on one of the hot, languid
days of August, <sc>A.D.</sc> 79, by a Roman soldier with a piece of
red chalk on a wall of his barracks in the city of Pompeii.[A]
On the 23d of August, in the year 79, occurred the eruption
of Vesuvius, which buried not Italian cities only, but Antiquity
itself, and, by burying, preserved it for the instruction of after-times. In
disinterred Pompeii, the Past stands revealed to us, and we remark with a kind

[Footnote A: "Naples and the Campagna Felice." In a Series of Letters addressed to a Friend in England,
in 1802, p. 104.][*** Text cropped to fit the screen.      ]



11 Illustrations 111-13A                 Updated  2014/08/13

stooping as the club passes in front of the legs. Beginners
should practise front swings, and follow them up until they
are done with before attempting anything else.

[Illustration: <sc>Fig. 7.</sc>]

[Illustration: <sc>Fig. 9.</sc>]

<sc>Circles, Swings, and Twists</sc>--It should be noted
that circles are divided into "swings" and "twists." The

[*** Two separate illustrations: each one has its own ID. The number and period are part of the  ]
[*** ID and go INSIDE the tags.  If "Fig." is in italics, include the numbers and periods in the ]
[*** italics tags, too, unless the Project Comments or Discussion say otherwise.                 ]



11 Illustrations 111-15A                 Updated  2013/11/10




CHAPTER III.

HOW G, B AND K COMPANIES WENT TO SOUTH FRAMINGHAM.


While the naval militiamen of Springfield were being
sent off to their places of duty amid the
cheers of the people plans for the mobilization of
the land forces of the state were going on apace.
The call of President McKinley for troops was issued on
April 23 and six days later on April 29, Col. Embury P.
Clark of the Second Regiment of Infantry, M. V. M., was
[*** Treat an illustrated drop-cap or a regular drop-cap ]
[*** like a plain, capitalized letter. Don't indicate it ]
[*** with an [Illustration] tag, and make sure the first ]
[*** word in the body of a chapter is in normal          ]
[*** mixed-case, not in small-caps or all-caps.          ]
[***                                                     ]
[*** Some projects may request other ways of marking     ]
[*** illustrated letters; if they don't, and you're not  ]
[*** sure what to do, "ASK." If you don't receive an     ]
[*** answer, the explanation here follows the guidelines.]



11 Illustrations 111-16A                 Updated  2014/08/13

[Illustration:

/#
Courtesy of the "Scientific American"
#/

<sc>Fig. 23.</sc> Ocean currents of the North Atlantic showing the
probable path of drifting mines]
[*** The next several examples focus on variations in the captions, so they don't include the ]
[*** actual illustrations except when needed to explain why certain methods were used.        ]
[*** Projects with special formatting requirements often will include instructions that, of   ]
[*** course, override these examples.  If not, or you're not sure what to do, "ASK".          ]
[***                                                                                          ]
[*** Captions normally are centered, and we do not indicate centering, so the main caption    ]
[*** doesn't need block markers. However, the "credit" line is left-justified, and we must    ]
[*** indicate that. If no guidance is found in the Project Comments or Discussion, ASK; and   ]
[*** absent guidance, use Block Quotes.                                                       ]
[***                                                                                          ]
[*** "Fig." is in small-caps, so enclose the entire identification "Fig. 23." in those tags.  ]
[***                                                                                          ]
[*** If "Fig." is in italics, include the number and period in the italics tag, too, unless   ]
[*** the Project Comments or Discussion say otherwise.                                        ]



11 Illustrations 111-17A                 Updated  2014/08/13

[Illustration:

/#
<sc>Fig. 6.</sc> British rifle grenade with a safety-device which is
unlocked by the rush of air against a set of inclined vanes,
<i>D</i>, when the missile is in flight
#/
]
[*** This caption is printed as a hanging indent (first line at the margin, other lines           ]
[*** indented uniformly).  The text is wrappable, so enclose it in Block Quotes.                  ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** Include the number and period in the small-caps. If "Fig." is in italics, include the number ]
[*** and period in the italics tag, too, unless the Project Comments or Discussion say otherwise. ]



11 Illustrations 111-18A                 Updated  2014/07/21

[Illustration:

/#
Courtesy of "Scientific American"
#/

One of our 16-inch Coast Defence Guns on a
disappearing mount]

[Illustration: Height of gun as compared
with the New York City Hall]
[*** Two illustrations, side-by-side, so use two Illustration tags.       ]
[*** The first has a left-justified "credit" line. If there's no project  ]
[*** guidance, "ASK", and, subject to further instructions, enclose that  ]
[*** line in Block Quotes. The main captions of both illustrations are    ]
[*** centered, and we do not indicate centering.                          ]



11 Illustrations 111-19A                 Updated  2014/07/21

[Illustration:

/#
Courtesy of "Scientific American"
#/

Inside of a Shrapnel Shell and Details of the Fuse Cap

Search-light Shell and one of
its Candles]
[*** This is unusual: one two-part illustration with two captions. The credit line is   ]
[*** left-justified, so enclose it in Block Quotes.  The two main captions are centered ]
[*** (under the parts they describe), so keep them separate (don't put them on the same ]
[*** line. Neither has any in-line formatting, and we don't indicate centering.         ]



11 Illustrations 111-20A                 Updated  2014/07/21

[Illustration:

/#
Courtesy of "Scientific American"
#/

Mechanism for Firing Between the Blades of the Propeller

/#
The cam <i>B</i> on the propeller shaft lifts the rod <i>C</i>, rocking the angle
lever <i>D</i> which moves the rod <i>E</i> and operates the firing-piece <i>F</i>.
Firing may be stopped by means of lever H[**italicize and space?]and Bowden wire <i>G</i>.
<i>I</i> is the ejection-tube for empty cartridges.
#/
]
[*** The "credit" line is left-justified, so enclose it in Block Quotes.            ]
[***                                                                                ]
[*** The main caption appears to be centered, and we don't indicate centering.      ]
[***                                                                                ]
[*** The description is printed as a normal paragraph with both margins justified.  ]
[*** We expect captions to be centered, and must indicate that this part is not.    ]
[*** If it isn't covered in the Project Comments or Discussion, "ASK"; and absent   ]
[*** further guidance, enclose such text in Block Quotes.                           ]



11 Illustrations 111-21A                 Updated  2014/07/21

[Illustration:

/*
(C) Committee on Public Information      From Western Newspaper Union
*/

Camouflaged Headquarters of the American 26th Division in France]
[*** One segment of the credit line is left-justified and the other is right-justified. ]
[*** Separate those segments with six spaces, as that's what the Guidelines specify for ]
[*** right-justified page numbers in a Table of Contents, and enclose the line in       ]
[*** no-wraps to preserve those spaces. (Extra spaces in wrappable text are deleted     ]
[*** automatically during post-processing.)                                             ]
[*** When there are three segments, separate each one with six spaces.                  ]
[***                                                                                    ]
[*** The main caption is centered, and we don't mark centered text.                     ]



11 Illustrations 111-22A                 Updated  2014/06/26




[Illustration]




TABLE


/*
I. Une Rencontre      1
II. La Confession      14
III. Marche funèbre      41
IV. C[oe]urs altiers      71
V. Les deux Cousines      93
VI. Une Nuit d'Hiver      113
VII. Autour d'une Tombe      135
VIII. Autour d'un Berceau      159
IX. L'Apache      181
X. Une Fin tragique      205
XI. Dans la Forêt mystérieuse      229
XII. La Défaite      248
XIII. La Pierre de Sang      261
XIV. Le Mot interdit      276
XV. Ferneuse et Valcor      292
XVI. Le Masque tombe      310
XVII. La Cordelière bleue      335
XVIII. Complices      365
XIX. La Mer qui monte      377
XX. Épilogue      387
*/

[Illustration]
[*** These kinds of illustrations are called "headpieces" and           ]
[*** "tailpieces," and their presence should be indicated by the use of ]
[*** [Illustration] tags, even though they're just decorative. The      ]
[*** post-processor can ignore them if s/he wishes to do so, but it's   ]
[*** easier to delete the tags than to add them.                        ]
[***                                                                    ]
[*** When an illustration appears at the beginning of a Major Division  ]
[*** (such as a Table of Contents), ASK about the blank-line spacing in ]
[*** the Project Discussion. If you don't get an answer, precede both   ]
[*** it and the heading with 4 blank lines: preceding it with only 1 or ]
[*** 2 blank lines implies that it's part of the preceding Major        ]
[*** Division, and a Major Division's heading always must be preceded   ]
[*** by 4 blank lines.                                                  ]
[***                                                                    ]
[*** The lines in this Table of Contents are very short, so it's shown  ]
[*** here with no blank lines between them. However, it's equally       ]
[*** correct to include such blank lines.                               ]



11 Illustrations 111-23A                 Updated  2014/10/10




[Illustration:

/*[*** Treat lyrics as poetry, enclosed in no-wraps ]
Bon-ny E-lo-ise, The Belle of the Mo-hawk Vale.
*/
]

$20 Worth of Music for 10 Cents!


BEADLE'S

DIME MELODIST.

Comprising the MUSIC AND WORDS of the New and Most Popular

SONGS AND BALLADS,

/#[*** Hanging indent, so enclose it in a Block Quote ]
<sc>By J. R. THOMAS, GEO. F. ROOT, W. V. WALLACE, GEO. LINLEY,
STEPHEN GLOVER, SAMUEL LOVER</sc>, and other Eminent
Composers.
#/
[*** Treat bars of music as illustrations unless the Project Manager ]
[*** has given specific directions in the Project Comments.  Treat   ]
[*** the lyrics as poetry and surround them with nowrap tags.        ]
[***                                                                 ]
[*** If a project has a lot of music and the Project Manager has not ]
[*** requested special formatting, please ask for directions in the  ]
[*** Project Discussion.                                             ]



11 Illustrations 111-24A                 Updated  2015/08/25

[*** 2015-08-25 This example has been removed. ]



11 Illustrations 111-25A                 Updated  2018/09/10

[Illustration: <sc>SPOTTED KING FISHER.</sc>--<i>Céryle Guttáta.</i>]

[*** The words in all-caps are about the height of the lower-case  ]
[*** letters of the words in italics, rather than the height of    ]
[*** the italicized capital letters, so we tag them as small-caps. ]



12 Footnotes 112-00A                 Updated  2018/02/20

and whose name he gave to one of his most beautiful
creations.[1] She relates that the only out-door amusement
he cared for was "building"--in what material
does not appear. Among indoor diversions, that to
[*** (extraneous image & text omitted to save space)]
position so impressed his master that he accused him
(much to the boy's indignation) of having copied it
out of some book.

His chief taste was for drawing, and he was anxious
to become an artist; but his father could not afford
to pay for his training.[2] At the age of fifteen, therefore,
he had to set about earning his living, and was

[Footnote 1: See Introduction to <i>The Wild Duck</i>, p. xxiii.]

[Footnote 2: He continued to dabble in painting until he was thirty, or
thereabouts.]

[*** OVERVIEW OF FOOTNOTES:]
[*** Make sure there are matching references in the text, except when marking the continuation   ]
[*** of a footnote that began on an earlier page. When the references and footnotes use numbers  ]
[*** in the Image, do them as shown above; when they use symbols, replace them with A, B, C ...  ]
[*** The most common formatting errors in Footnotes are: 1) missing in-line markups, usually     ]
[*** because the text is small and needs to be read carefully; 2) placing periods that belong    ]
[*** to abbreviations outside markups instead of inside; and 3) not marking the footnotes        ]
[*** themselves. To format footnotes well, you simply must take more time: the text is smaller.  ]
[*** If you find a footnote without a matching reference in the text, leave a [**note]. If there ]
[*** is a missing footnote, leave a [**note], but first make sure the book isn't using Endnotes; ]
[*** if it is, don't leave a [**note], because the Post-Processor will know that anyway.         ]
[*** Oh! And when there's a continuation footnote, just add an asterisk; don't leave a [**note]. ]



12 Footnotes 112-01A                 Updated  2013/05/20

to accompany the expedition homeward, and his purpose
thus be frustrated, he kept himself in concealment
until it had sailed. These are, however, mere matters
of rumor and conjecture.[A]
[*** If a book used symbols as footnote anchors, the Proofers replaced them with [*]'s.         ]
[*** We Formatters change them to [A], [B], [C], etc.                                           ]

[*** Formatting the actual footnotes requires several separate steps:                           ]
[*** 1. Highlight the entire text of one footnote, then click the Footnote button to properly   ]
[***    enclose it in a footnote tag.                                                           ]
[*** 2. If the footnote used a symbol and is not a continuation, replace the symbol with        ]
[***    A, B, C, etc., so that it match the letter you used in the corresponding anchor in the  ]
[***    the text. Make sure there's a blank line above the first line of the footnote.          ]
[*** 3. format the text within the footnote just as though it was normal text. This includes    ]
[***    in-line markups, blank lines, block quotes, no-wraps, and indented poetry.              ]
[*** 4. if a footnote appears to continue onto the next page, add a continuation asterisk after ]
[***    the closing bracket. If you're not sure, peek at the next page to find out.             ]
[*** 5. if you're formatting the continuation of a footnote, add a continuation asterisk before ]
[***    the opening bracket. There should be no footnote number or letter in a continuation, so ]
[***    the colon should immediately follow the word "Footnote". The button will do this for    ]
[***    you, although you'll still have to add the leading asterisk.                            ]
[*** You can do these steps in whatever sequence you prefer ... as long as they all get done.   ]
[*** Be sure to use the button: it's too easy to make mistakes when typing all this yourself.   ]

[Footnote A: Mr. Verhoeff, from all accounts, seemed perfectly content and much interested
in his work as mineralogist and meteorologist, and manifested no anxiety to be one
of the party on the trip across the inland ice.]



12 Footnotes 112-02A                 Updated  2011/04/18

[*** When the book used symbols for footnote references, the Proofers replaced all of them with]
[*** asterisks [*]. We Formatters replace those asterisks with A, B, C, etc.  This page has two]
[*** such footnotes.]

1st.--The Rink to be forty-two yards from tee to tee,[A]
unless otherwise agreed upon by the parties. When a
game is begun the rink cannot be changed or altered
[*** (omitted)]
5th.--Curling-stones must be of a circular shape.
No stone to be changed during a game,[B] unless it happen

[*** The Proofers did nothing special with the actual footnotes. We Formatters enclose each of]
[*** them in its own footnote tag. If the footnotes used symbols, we replace those symbols with]
[*** the same letters we assigned in the corresponding references.]
[Footnote A: The Grand Caledonian Curling Club recommend that rinks
have double tees at each end, the one at least two yards behind the
other; the whole four to be nearly as possible on the same line.
The stones are to be delivered from the outer tee and played towards
the inner; this saves the ice from being injured around the tee
played up to.]

[Footnote B: With regard to double-soled stones, the Grand Caledonian
Curling Club has a law that the side commenced with shall not,
under forfeiture of the match, be changed during the progress of
the game.]



12 Footnotes 112-03A                 Updated  2011/05/04

While Roger Ascham renders due homage to the linguistic
attainments of his queen,[3] he finds it necessary to reproach
[*** (omitted)]

[Footnote 3: Elizabeth's command of foreign languages was constantly a subject of remark.
Dr. William Turner in the dedication of his <i>Herbal</i> (1568) to the queen, addresses her
thus: "As to your knowledge of Latin and Greek, French, Italian, and others also,
not only your own faythful subiectes, beynge far from all suspicion of flattery, bear
witness, but also strangers, men of great learninge, in their books set out in Latin tonge,]*
[*** This footnote continues on the next page, as the next example will show.]
[*** We use an asterisk at the end to indicate that, and it goes OUTSIDE the closing bracket.]
[*** Do NOT use a [**note] to mention the continuation: the asterisk does that.]



12 Footnotes 112-04A                 Updated  2013/05/20

respect. Professional teachers of modern languages likewise
complain of the lack of seriousness on the part of many of
their pupils. John Florio,[1] for example, bewails the fact that
when they have learned two words of Spanish, three words
of French, and four words of Italian, they think they have
[*** (omitted)]

We may therefore safely conclude that French was the
language commonly spoken by Englishmen in their intercourse
with foreigners, although Latin was sometimes used in conversation,
and Italians were occasionally addressed in their

[*** When a footnote continues from the previous page, enclose it in a Footnote tag and ]
[*** show it's a continuation by preceding the opening bracket with an asterisk. Please ]
[*** DO NOT leave a note about the continuation: that's what the asterisk means.        ]
[*** A continuation does not have a number or letter, just "Footnote: " and the text.   ]
*[Footnote: give honourable testimonye." Best known of these learned observers was Scaliger
(<i>Scaligeriana</i>, Cologne, 1695, p. 134). Similar eulogies in verse were left by French
poets: Ronsard, <i>Elegies, Mascarades et Bergeries</i> (1561), reproduced in <i>Le Bocage
royal</i> (1567); Jacques Grévin, <i>Chant du cygne</i>; Du Bartas, <i>Second Week</i>; and
Agrippa d'Aubigné; also by John Florio, <i>First Frutes</i>, 1578, ch. xiii.]

[*** Footnotes for this page follow the continuation.]
[Footnote 1: <i>First Frutes</i>, 1578, ch. i.]



12 Footnotes 112-05A                 Updated  2014/07/09

awoke and found it truth:[1]--I am more zealous in this
affair, because I have never yet been able to perceive how
anything can be known for truth by consecutive reasoning

[*** Formatting Poetry in a Footnote is like doing it in any other place.]
[Footnote 1:
 
/*[*** a blank line between footnote tag and opening no-wrap is REQUIRED.]
"She disappear'd, and left me dark: I waked
To find her, or for ever to deplore
Her loss, and other pleasures all abjure:
When, out of hope, behold her not far off,
Such as I saw her in my dream, adorn'd
With what all Earth or Heaven could bestow
To make her amiable."
*/
 
/*
<i>Paradise Lost</i>, Book VIII.
*/
]
[*** Left-justify Attribution. It was right-justified in the Image, so enclose it in no-wrap. ]
[*** Some Post-Processors prefer the attribution and the poem to be in seperate no-wraps, as  ]
[*** shown here, while others prefer them to be in the same no-wrap (as shown in other        ]
[*** examples). So, check the Project Comments and Discussion, and if this hasn't been        ]
[*** covered, ASK for guidance.                                                               ]
[*** Ignore a stanza's leading quotation mark when indenting its other lines. (Don't indent   ]
[*** them by an extra space.)                                                                 ]
[*** No blank line between closing no-wrap tag and closing footnote bracket, but they MUST be ]
[*** on separate lines.                                                                       ]



12 Footnotes 112-06A                 Updated  2013/04/05

made the lyre, had been transfigured into it. I may
remark here that the German name for the tortoise is
Schild-kröte (toad with shields), that the Koribantes[1]
produced their noisy music, and accompanied their
Pyrrhic dances with kettledrums and the sound of arms,

[*** This footnote contains both prose and poetry.]
[Footnote 1: The Koribantes remind us of the Salii of the Latins, to whom
Numa gives the arms and the words, to be sung leaping. According to
Ovid's distich--
 
/*
"Jam dederat Salii (a saltu nomina ducunt)
  Armaque et ad certos verba canenda modos."
 
--<i>Fasti</i>, iii. 389.
*/
]
[*** As explained in the previous example, some Post-Processors prefer the Attribution to be ]
[*** in the same no-wrap as the quotation (as shown here), while others prefer them to be in ]
[*** separate no-wraps (as shown in the previous example).  If it isn't covered in the       ]
[*** Project Comments or Discussion, ASK; if no one answers, either way will be acceptable.  ]



12 Footnotes 112-07A                 Updated  2011/04/18

[*** Formatted text shown]
[*** in next example.]
[*** Text & Image would]
[*** be too small to read]
[*** on one screen.]



12 Footnotes 112-07B                 Updated  2011/04/21

[*** See previous example for large Image of page.]

The whole of the space between the parish boundary and Great
Turnstile was occupied by houses at least as early as, and probably long
before, the reign of Henry VIII. In 1545, Edward Stockwood sold to
Thomas Dyxson, 5 messuages and 5 gardens in the parishes of St. Andrew,
Holborn, and St. Giles-in-the-Fields,[A] and when, in the following year,
Dyxson transferred the property to Richard Clyff, the western and eastern
boundaries are described[B] as the tenement of John Coke and the inn called
<i>The Antelope</i>, respectively. In the course of the next century, the five
houses seem to have been divided or rebuilt as seven houses, four of which
were in St. Giles, the remaining three being in St. Andrew's.[C]

Between the westernmost of these and Great Turnstile there were,
in 1545, three houses in the possession of John Coke.[D] These had belonged
to the Priory of St. John of Jerusalem before the dissolution of that
monastery.[E]

Great Turnstile is mentioned as early as 1522, under the name
"Turngatlane"[F]; it was also known as "Turnpiklane."[G] It is quite
certain that in 1545 no houses had been built along the sides of Great
Turnstile, and none probably were erected there until many years later.
The earliest records so far obtained of such houses on the eastern and
western sides of the lane are dated respectively 1632 and 1630[H], and
probably these dates are not far removed from the actual time of building.

Reference was made in a previous volume[I] to the ten houses
belonging to the Priory of St. John of Jerusalem, which, in the reign of
Henry VIII., occupied the frontage of High Holborn, between Great Turnstile
and certain property belonging to the Hospital of St. Giles, and it was

[*** This page has 9 symbol-type footnotes. In the body text, replace the Proofer's [*]'s with [A], then]
[*** [B], [C], etc., and use the same letters in the corresponding footnotes, as shown below.]
[Footnote A: <i>Middlesex Feet of Fines</i>, 37 Henry VIII., Mich.]

[Footnote B: <i>British Museum Addl. MS.</i>, Charters, 15636.]

[Footnote C: Namely, reckoning west to east: (i.) <i>Star</i>; (ii.) unnamed house of John Bishop;
(iii.) <i>Sun and Dolphin</i>; (iv.) <i>Gridiron</i> (easternmost house in St. Giles); (v.) <i>Eagle and
Child</i>; (vi.) <i>Cock and Coffin</i>; (vii.) unnamed house in occupation of Thos. Fisher. (<i>Close
Rolls</i>, (<i>a</i>) 1652, Alexander Goddard, etc., and Philip Cotham; (<i>b</i>) 1652, Alexander Goddard,
etc., and Jonathan Read; (<i>c</i>) 13 Chas. II., Samuel Bishopp and William Rymes).]

[Footnote D: Sale by Robert Harris to John Coke (<i>Land Revenue Enrolments and Grants</i>, vol. 311,
p. 204.]

[Footnote E: <i>Survey of London</i>, Vol. III. (St. Giles-in-the-Fields, Part I.), p. 3.]

[Footnote F: <i>British Museum MS. Claudius</i> E VI, 218<i>b</i>-219.]

[Footnote G: Grant to Thos. Ellys, 22 Henry VIII (<i>Land Revenue Miscellaneous Books</i>, No. 62);
grant to Thomas Bochier (<i>Patent Roll</i>, 36 Henry VIII. (745)).]

[Footnote H: Lease of 21st July, 8 Chas. I., by Henry Hurlestone to John Allen and Thomas
Clements (<i>Chancery Proceedings, Bridges</i> 5-105,--Suit of John King); <i>Close Roll</i>, 6 Chas. I.
(2853)--Indenture between Wm. Newton <i>and</i> Anthony Bailey and John Johnson.]

[Footnote I: <i>Survey of London</i>, Vol. III. (St. Giles in-the-Fields, Part I.), pp. 3-4.]



12 Footnotes 112-08A                 Updated  2011/04/13

[*** There's a citation for this article at the bottom of the page.]
[*** It looks and quacks like a footnote, so mark it that way, even though]
[*** it doesn't have a number or symbol, and no reference to it in the text.]
[*** Then, add a comment to call it to the attention of the Post-Processor.]
[*** (This occurs often in periodicals, but unmatched Footnotes / references may occur]
[*** anywhere. Make sure the book is not using Endnotes, and if not, leave a note.)]




THE PYRENEES.


Baron Vaerst's animated account
of his Pyrenean wanderings and observations,
forms one of the pleasantest
books of its class we for some
time have met with. As the issue of
a German pen, one so agreeable was
scarcely to be expected. Whatever
be thought of the present condition of
[*** (omitted)]

[** This appears to be an un-referenced 'footnote']
[Footnote: <i>Die Pyrenäen.</i> <sc>Von Eugen Baron Vaerst.</sc> Zwei Bände: Breslau, 1847.]



12 Footnotes 112-09A                 Updated  2011/04/13

/#
"The poor Duke's next letter, dated July 13th I
will copy throughout as it refers to his affliction--in
the loss of his Grand Son."[10][*** This book uses Endnotes.]
[*** Once you know a book uses Endnotes, please do not leave]
[*** notes about them: such notes are counter-productive.]
[*** However, try checking (or ASKING) to find out whether]
[*** it references an Endnote or a missing footnote.]
[*** Looking at some other page images often is useful.]
#/



12 Footnotes 112-10A                 Updated  2014/07/09

[*** This footnote contains both wrappable text and some poetry.  Two parts of the poem were     ]
[*** omitted in ways that require two different formatting methods.                              ]

[Footnote 1: Robert Jephson's successful tragedy <i>Braganza</i> was played at Drury
Lane in February, 1775, Mrs. Yates taking the part of Louisa, Duchess of
Braganza. Gibbon is probably referring to this play in comparing Mrs.
Holroyd to the spirited Duchess. The answer of "My Lady" is in keeping
with the character of the Duchess as depicted in the play--
 
/*
"I have a woman's form, a woman's fears,
I shrink from pain and start at dissolution.
 
<tb>[*** The line of dots shows omitted material and a normal Thought Break is appropriate here. ]
[*** Below, the omitted material is in-line, so we can't use a Thought Break. However, we can    ]
[*** replicate the indentation and use an ellipsis to represent the original dots.               ]
[*** Ignore a stanza's leading quotation mark when indenting its other lines. (Don't indent      ]
[*** them by an extra space.)                                                                    ]
 
Yet summoned as we are, your honour pledged,
Your own just rights engaged, your country's fate,
                    ... Still would I on,[*** Use an indented ellipsis to show omitted material. ]
Still urge, exhort, confirm thy constancy,
And, though we perished in the bold attempt,
With my last breath I'd bless the glorious cause,
And think it happiness to die so nobly."
*/
]



12 Footnotes 112-11A                 Updated  2011/06/25

[*** These footnotes demonstrate the criteria for placing periods INSIDE or OUTSIDE the markups. ]
[*** #1 is straightforward: a mixed sentence (upright and italics), so the period goes OUTSIDE.  ]
[*** #2 is also a mixed sentence: "Stanhope" is upright, the colon is a separator, and only the  ]
[***    name of the book is in italics, so the period goes OUTSIDE.                              ]
[*** #3 is a completely italicized "sentence" containing only the name of the book, so the period]
[***    goes INSIDE the tags.                                                                    ]
[*** #4 is like #2, with the period OUTSIDE.  However, the comma is part of the title, so it goes]
[***    INSIDE the single pair of tags.                                                          ]
[***                                                                                             ]
[*** And, for purposes of determining sentence structure, the Footnote tag itself, which includes]
[*** the number and colon, is not part of the text, so its colon has nothing to do with whether  ]
[*** or not "Jerningham Letters." in the third Footnote is a complete sentence.  It is.          ]

[Footnote 1: A contemporary account, quoted in <i>George III, his Court
and Family</i>.]

[Footnote 2: Stanhope: <i>Life of Pitt</i>.]

[Footnote 3: <i>Jerningham Letters.</i>]

[Footnote 4: Galt: <i>George III, his Court and Family</i>.]



12 Footnotes 112-12A                 Updated  2012/06/04

d'une question en se la posant à lui-même dans un
Mémoire intéressant: <i>La représentation satirique
a-t-elle existé dans les monuments du moyen âge[1]?</i>

Un numismate, M. L. Cartier, dans un discours

[Footnote 1: <i>Bulletin de la Société archéologique du Vendômois.</i> Vendôme,
1869, in-8 de 29 pages.]

[*** The convention for how footnote anchors (the '[1]' above) are printed in French texts seems ]
[*** to be different from how they are printed in English texts: in French, the anchors are      ]
[*** positioned INSIDE the ending punctuation, rather than OUTSIDE. This may affect formatting   ]
[*** when the text requires in-line tagging (e.g., italics): if the ending punctuation belongs   ]
[*** inside the tags, the anchor will be inside the tags also.                                   ]



12 Footnotes 112-13A                 Updated  2014/01/03

<i>Rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques.</i> Elle fait la continuation
de la rue Saint-Jacques depuis les rues Saint-Hyacinthe
et des Fossés-Saint-Jacques jusqu'à la barrière et
au nouveau boulevard[1].[*** Normal footnote.]

[Footnote 1:  Cette rue étoit anciennement traversée par plusieurs rues,
et contenoit quelques culs-de-sacs, qui, même avant la révolution,
ne subsistoient plus qu'en partie.

1^o. La <i>rue de Paradis</i>. Elle étoit située à côté du passage qui
conduisoit aux Ursulines. Son premier nom étoit <i>rue Notre-Dame-des-Champs</i>[A];[*** Footnote to a footnote.]
on la nomma ensuite <i>ruelle Jean-le-Riche</i>
et <i>Neuve-Jean-Richer</i>[B], <i>des Poteries</i>, <i>de Saint-Severin</i>.
Le nom de Paradis vient d'une enseigne. (Cette rue, élargie
maintenant par la démolition du couvent qui en étoit voisin,
est appelée rue des Ursulines.)]

[Footnote A: Sauval, t, I, p. 255.][*** Footnote to a footnote. Book used symbols for them, so we use letters.]

[Footnote B: Cens. de S. Genev.]   [*** Place them just after the normal footnotes on the page.]



12 Footnotes 112-14A                 Updated  2014/06/26

succeeded in keeping female and working ants alive for seven
years--a great age for insects[2],--while the males only lived a few
weeks.

[Footnote 2: [Sir John Lubbock has now kept a queen ant alive for nearly 15 years. See note
2 on p. 51.--E. B. P.]]
[*** This footnote was printed with its own brackets, so include them in the text, but move  ]
[*** the footnote number outside of the printed opening bracket, and follow it with a space. ]
[*** Then, highlight the entire text of the footnote, including the number, and click the    ]
[*** [Footnote] button to add the tags.  The result should resemble this example.            ]



12 Footnotes 112-15A                 Updated  2020/02/05

[1]The pastors of the church at Basil, in their letter to the
syndics and senate of Geneva, express their joy for the apprehension
of Servetus, and advise them first to "Use all endeavours
to recover him; but that if he persisted in his perverseness,
they should punish him according to their office, and the
power they had received from God, to prevent his giving any
disturbance to the church, and lest the latter end should be
worse than the first." [2]The ministers of the church of Bern
were of the same opinion; and in their letter to the magistrates
of Geneva say, "We pray the Lord that he would give you
the spirit of prudence, counsel and strength, to remove this
plague from the churches, both your own and others," and
advise them "to neglect nothing that may be judged unworthy
a Christian magistrate to omit." [3]The ministers of Zurich
give much the same advice, and thought that there was
need of a great deal of diligence in the affair; "especially
as the reformed churches were evil thought of, amongst other
reasons for this, as being themselves heretical, and favourers
of heretics. But that, as the Providence of God had given
them an opportunity of wiping off so evil a suspicion, and
preventing the farther spreading of so contagious a poison,
they did not doubt but their excellencies would be careful to
improve it." [4]Those of Scaffhusen subscribed to the judg-*

[Footnote 1: Ibid.]

[Footnote 2: Ibid.]

[Footnote 3: Ibid.]

[Footnote 4: Ibid.]
[*** The footnote anchors on this page precede, rather than ]
[*** follow, the text. Format them just as you would format ]
[*** normal anchors, but leave them where they appeared     ]
[*** originally, to the left of the text.                   ]



13 Sidenotes 113-00A                 Updated  2013/04/07




CHAPTER I

URANUS AND EROS


[Sidenote: Popular
view of
discovery.]

Discovery is expected from an astronomer. The
lay mind scarcely thinks of a naturalist nowadays
discovering new animals, or of a chemist as finding
new elements save on rare occasions; but it

[*** OVERVIEW OF SIDENOTES:                                                                                  ]
[*** Sidenotes normally occur in the wide margins of some books. Sometimes, the Project Manager may ask the  ]
[*** Proofers to reproduce the page headings, and ask the Foofers to treat those as sidenotes.               ]
[*** When possible, move each Sidenote just above the paragraph to which it belongs, preceded and followed   ]
[*** by a blank line.  If the paragraph began on the previous page, move its Sidenote(s) to the very top of  ]
[*** the page, preceded by an asterisk but not a blank line (just like an Illustration). If a paragraph has  ]
[*** several such sidenotes, precede each of them with an asterisk, and leave a blank line between each of   ]
[*** them. Rarely, a sidenote will begin on one page and continue on the next. The Guidelines are silent on  ]
[*** this, so ASK whether or not to use continuation asterisks for both parts, as we do for Footnotes.       ]
[*** As with other formatting markups, it's best to use the [Sidenote] button in the Proofing Interface:     ]
[*** highlight the text of the sidenote and then click the button. Check the line spacing afterwards.        ]
[*** Format the text within a sidenote normally. If the sidenote's text appears to be entirely in Boldface,  ]
[*** it's probably just a font change, but ASK in the Project Discussion whether or not 'bold' tags are      ]
[*** needed.                                                                                                 ]



13 Sidenotes 113-01A                 Updated  2011/04/18

 
[Sidenote: Advantage in
distances.]
[*** Move Sidenote to just above the start of its paragraph (if on the same page), and]
[*** leave a blank line between them. Since the paragraph in this example does begin on]
[*** this page, leave a blank line above as well as below the Sidenote.]
[*** Do not precede the Sidenote with an asterisk unless its paragraph, or the Sidenote]
[*** itself, began on the previous page, as that would indicate that the Sidenote needs]
[*** to be moved up further during Post-Processing.]
 
The half-way point on the Pacific side between
America and England is the Malay Peninsula.
This leaves even Australia and all of
Oceanica nearer to us than to England, and all
of China, Japan and Siberia thousands of miles
nearer to us. Hong Kong and Canton are the
English headquarters in China, and yet our Pacific
coast is 5,000 miles nearer to these than



13 Sidenotes 113-02A                 Updated  2011/04/30

*[Sidenote: Seven seams.]
 
*[Sidenote: Details.][** To which paragraph does this belong?]
[*** The paragraph began on the previous page, so move the sidenotes to the very top]
[*** of the page, NOT preceded by a blank line, tag them, and precede the opening]
[*** brackets with an asterisk, to indicate that they will need to be moved up to the]
[*** beginning of the paragraph. Leave a blank line between each Sidenote.]
[*** (The note suggests that the second Sidenote may have been printed too high.)]
 
was able to examine three seams which will
be mined at first, and give the following
details.

Top Seam, No. 4, descending:



13 Sidenotes 113-03A                 Updated  2013/04/07

the result of various causes, as, for instance, a revolution
within the sending or receiving State. Whatever
the cause may be, an envoy enjoys all his privileges
during the duration of the suspension.

[*** Although you can't tell just by looking at this page, the Formatter found that this        ]
[*** Sidenote continues on next page. (It's our next example.) The Guidelines do not address    ]
[*** continuation sidenotes, so in the actual project, the formatter asked about it in the      ]
[*** Project Discussion. Even if you don't receive a reply, your question will alert the        ]
[*** Post-Processor to look for this rare, special situation.                                   ]
[Sidenote: Accomplishment]

§ 407. A mission comes to an end through the fulfilment
of its objects in all cases of missions for special
[*** This paragraph begins with a Section symbol (§), so why is there only one blank line above ]
[*** it?  Because the Project Comments explained that these actually are sub-Sections, and to   ]
[*** treat them as normal paragraphs, preceded by only one blank line. If the PC's had not      ]
[*** addressed this issue, the § and the lack of extra white space above the paragraph would be ]
[*** good reasons for just treating it as an in-line sub-section, preceded by one blank line.   ]



13 Sidenotes 113-04A                 Updated  2015/06/24

*[Sidenote: of Object
of Mission.]

purposes. Such cases may be ceremonial functions like
representations at weddings, funerals, coronations; or
notification of changes in the headship of a State, or
[*** This Sidenote is next to a paragraph that began on the previous page, so move the  ]
[*** Sidenote tag to the very top of the page and precede it with an asterisk, which    ]
[*** will tell the Post-Processor to move it above the beginning of the paragraph.      ]
[*** As always, follow it with a blank line to separate it from the regular text.       ]
[***                                                                                    ]
[*** If you saw the previous example (or the previous page in the original project),    ]
[*** you'll realize that the Sidenote itself also is a continuation; but even if you    ]
[*** didn't know that, the asterisk will signal the need for special handling.          ]



14 Table_of_Contents 114-00A                 Updated  2013/04/28

[*** This Table of Contents (ToC) is as simple]
[*** as they get. Aligning the page numbers]
[*** was not required by Guidelines, but may]
[*** save some time for the Post-Processor.]




CONTENTS


/*
                                           PAGE
Thomas the Rhymer                             1

Gold-Tree and Silver-Tree                    17

Whippety-Stourie                             33

The Red-Etin                                 42

The Seal Catcher and the Merman              58

The Page-boy and the Silver Goblet           67
*/

[*** OVERVIEW OF TABLES OF CONTENTS ("TOC"):  ]
[*** They are easy to do because there is so  ]
[*** little to do:                            ]
[*** 1. leave 4 blank lines above "Contents"; ]
[*** 2. leave 2 blank lines below "Contents"; ]
[*** 3. leave at least 6 spaces before the    ]
[***    page numbers and the word "page" if   ]
[***    it appears above those numbers (as it ]
[***    does in this example).                ]
[*** 4. left-justify everything else.         ]
[*** 5. leave a blank line wherever you see   ]
[***    a need for one; two if you must.      ]
[*** 6. DO ALL OF THE IN-LINE FORMATTING.     ]
[*** 7. enclose everything except "CONTENTS"  ]
[***    in no-wraps.                          ]
[*** 8. Don't unwrap/rejoin any lines.        ]
[*** Aligning page numbers, and possibly      ]
[*** other items, is not necessary, but may   ]
[*** help the Post-Processor.                 ]



14 Table_of_Contents 114-01A                 Updated  2011/04/30

[*** Another simple Table of Contents. The 4/2 line spacing around the "Contents" line is]
[*** required, as is using no-wrap around the "body" of the text and leaving at least 6 spaces]
[*** before the page numbers.  Aligning the text to match the Image is not required by]
[*** Guidelines, but may save some time for the Post-Processor.]




CONTENTS.


/*
                                                       PAGE
I. The Philippines as a Subject for Historical Study      9

II. The Peoples of the Philippines      25

III. Europe and the Far East about 1400 A.D.      42

IV. The Great Geographical Discoveries      61

V. Filipino People Before the Arrival of the Spaniards      88
*/



14 Table_of_Contents 114-02A                 Updated  2011/04/20




CONTENTS


/*[*** This satisfies the requirements in the Formatting Guidelines.]
CHAPTER I

1488-1501

      PAGE[*** precede with least 6 spaces to show it needs to be right-justified]

INTRODUCTORY--WHY KATHARINE CAME TO ENGLAND--POLITICAL[** paragraphs are in Hanging Indents]
MATRIMONY            1


CHAPTER II

1501-1509

KATHARINE'S WIDOWHOOD AND WHY SHE STAYED IN ENGLAND      25
*/



14 Table_of_Contents 114-03A                 Updated  2011/04/18

[*** The Formatter did everything necessary,]
[*** and no more: correct spacing, no-wrap,]
[*** page numbers at least 6 spaces from]
[*** text, and in-line markups.]




CONTENTS


/*
      PAGE

<sc>Intaglio Printing</sc>              1

Intaglio plates               2

Line engraving              2

Etching                 5

Soft-ground etching            6

Mezzotint                7

Photogravure               8

<sc>Plane Surface Printing</sc>            15

Lithography               15

Chromolithography            20
*/



14 Table_of_Contents 114-07A                 Updated  2011/04/04




TABLE OF CONTENTS


/*[*** In a TOC, use no-wrap even if it looks wrappable.]
Chap.      Page

XLIII. Declining Health of Charles, Duke of Buccleuch.--Letter
on the Death of Queen
Charlotte.--Provincial Antiquities, etc.--Extensive
Sale of Copyrights to Constable &
Co.--Death of Mr. Charles Carpenter.--Scott accepts
the Offer of a Baronetcy.--He
declines to renew his Application for a
Seat on the Exchequer Bench.--Letters to
Morritt, Richardson, Miss Baillie, the Duke
of Buccleuch, Lord Montagu, and Captain
Ferguson.--Rob Roy played at Edinburgh.--Letter
from Jedediah Cleishbotham to
Mr. Charles Mackay. 1818-1819      1

XLIV. Recurrence of Scott's Illness.--Death of the
Duke of Buccleuch.--Letters to Captain
Ferguson, Lord Montagu, Mr. Southey, and
Mr. Shortreed.--Scott's Sufferings while
dictating The Bride of Lammermoor.--Anecdotes
by James Ballantyne, etc.--Appearance
of the Third Series of Tales of
my Landlord.--Anecdote of the Earl of
Buchan. 1819      24
*/



14 Table_of_Contents 114-08A                 Updated  2011/04/20

[*** Again, just the minimum: correct spacing, no-wrap, and in-line markups.]




CONTENTS.


/*
      <sc>Page</sc>

WEALTH      15
<i>Including</i>
<sc>The Lovely Young Man</sc>      28
<sc>If I'd a Million Millions</sc>      35
<sc>Farmer Stebbins on Rollers</sc>      40

WANT      46
<i>Including</i>
<sc>That Swamp of Death</sc>      53
<sc>A Sewing-Girl's Diary</sc>      64
*/



14 Table_of_Contents 114-09A                 Updated  2013/04/18

/*
      PAGE
amusement--Novelty and exploration--The formation of
cêntres[**query accent cèntres][**P3 speck only]--Narrowing of the field of mountaineering--The upward
limit of mountaineering--De Saussure's experience--Modern
development of climbing--Mr. Whymper's experience--Mr.
Graham's experience--The ascent of great heights--Mr.
Grove's views--Messrs. Coxwell and Glaisher's balloon
experiences--Reasons for dissenting from Mr. Glaisher's
views--The possibility of ascending Mount Everest--Physiological
aspect of the question--Acclimatisation to great
heights--The direction in which mountaineering should be
developed--The results that may be obtained--Chamouni a
century hence--A Rip van Winkle in the Pennine Alps--The
dangers of mountaineering--Conclusion      300
*/




[*** This is a Major Division, even though it's on the same page as the Table of Contents.]
ILLUSTRATIONS


/*
<sc>The Bietschhorn from the Petersgrat</sc>      <i>Frontispiece</i>

<sc>The Aiguille du Dru from the South</sc>       <i>to face page</i>      169

<sc>A Vision on a Summit</sc>                            "      282
*/



15 Table_of_Illustrations 115-00A                 Updated  2011/04/13

[*** Format a Table (or List) of Illustrations as though it was a Table of Contents.]
[*** See that Category's first page for an OVERVIEW that applies equally well here. ]




LIST OF MAPS


/*
The Roman Empire in the Second Century <sc>A. D.</sc>                <i>Frontispiece</i>

                                                           PAGE

The Peoples of Italy about 500 <sc>B. C.</sc>                         14

The Environs of Rome                                         24

Roman Expansion in Italy to 265 <sc>B. C.</sc>                        32

The Expansion of Rome in the Mediterranean World 265-44 <sc>B. C.</sc>      68
[*** Line did not need to be rejoined.]

The Roman Empire from 31 <sc>B. C.</sc> to 300 <sc>A. D.</sc>                 204

The Roman Empire in 395 <sc>A. D.</sc>                               332

The Roman Empire and the Germanic Kingdoms in 526 <sc>A. D.</sc>     368

The Roman Empire in 565 <sc>A. D.</sc>                               380
*/



15 Table_of_Illustrations 115-01A                 Updated  2011/04/13

[*** This says "Index" and is alphabetical, but it's still a Table of Illustrations.]
[*** (It was page ix in the book, near the front, and presumably was covered in the]
[*** Project Comments or discussion.)Note that we precede the right-justified words] 
[*** with at least 6 spaces, too.]




INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS


/*
<sc>Portrait of William Robert Prince</sc>      <i>Frontispiece</i>

                   FACING PAGE[*** all upper-case, not small-caps]

<sc>Abundance</sc>      136

<sc>Agen</sc>      138

<sc>America</sc>      142

<sc>Ames</sc>      144

<sc>Apple</sc>      146
*/



15 Table_of_Illustrations 115-02A                 Updated  2011/03/25




ILLUSTRATIONS.


/*
      <sc>Page</sc>

"<i>These are the spires that were gleaming</i>"      <i>Frontispiece.</i>

"<i>I saw tall derricks by the hundred rise</i>"      21

"<i>I reached my hand down for it and it stopped</i>"      29

"<i>When all to once the wheels departed suddenly above, an' took along my heels</i>"      43

<i>Farmer Stebbins on Rollers</i>      45

"<i>Yes, it's straight and true, good preacher, every word that you have said</i>"      51

"<i>Choked and strangled by the foul breath of the chimneys over there</i>"      54

"<i>Oh, the air is pure and wholesome where some babies coo and rest, and they trim
them out with ribbons, and they feed them with the best</i>"      55
*/



15 Table_of_Illustrations 115-03A                 Updated  2011/03/09

[*** The alignments are nice but unnecessary.]
[*** Note that the Roman Numerals are NOT in Small-caps.]
[*** The next example shows how this will look in _Plain Text_.]




LIST OF PLATES


/*
PLATE

   I. <sc>Portrait of J. C. Adams</sc>          <i>To face page</i>       22

  II. <sc>Portrait of A. Graham</sc>                "   "            22

 III. <sc>Portrait of U. J. Le Verrier</sc>         "   "            60

  IV. <sc>Portrait of J. G. Galle</sc>              "   "            60

   V. <sc>Corner of the Berlin Map by
      the use of which Galle found
      Neptune</sc>                              "   "            82

  VI. <sc>Astronomers Royal</sc>                         <i>Frontispiece</i>

 VII. <sc>Great Comet of Nov. 7, 1882</sc>      <i>To face page</i>      122

VIII. <sc>The Oxford New Star</sc>                  "   "           142
*/



15 Table_of_Illustrations 115-03B                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** The alignments are nice but unnecessary.]
[*** This is how the in-line markups on the previous page will look in _Plain Text_.]




LIST OF PLATES


/*
PLATE

   I. PORTRAIT OF J. C. ADAMS          _To face page_       22

  II. PORTRAIT OF A. GRAHAM                "   "            22

 III. PORTRAIT OF U. J. LE VERRIER         "   "            60

  IV. PORTRAIT OF J. G. GALLE              "   "            60

   V. CORNER OF THE BERLIN MAP BY
      THE USE OF WHICH GALLE FOUND
      NEPTUNE                              "   "            82

  VI. ASTRONOMERS ROYAL                         _Frontispiece_

 VII. GREAT COMET OF NOV. 7, 1882      _To face page_      122

VIII. THE OXFORD NEW STAR                  "   "           142
*/



16 Index 116-00A                 Updated  2011/04/13




INDEX[*** A simple Index. It's a Major Division, so use 4/2 spacing.]


/*[*** enclose all of it (except "Index") in no-wrap]
Aberration, 105-109, 111, 112, 117, 118, 185, 188, 192, 214, 215
[*** Unwrap entries until you reach a sub-entry. If (only) the first entry of each]
[*** section is in small-caps, leave it unmarked, in normal upper-lower-case.]

Accidental discovery, 15, 73, 121-154

Adams, 12, 45-85;[*** start each sub-entry on a new line,]
  resolution, 55[***  and indent sub-entries by 2 spaces, single-spaced.]

Airy, 32, 40-85, 214

Algiers, 130[*** leave a blank line between each primary entry]

Alleghenia, 26

Almucantar, 180, 181

Alphabet used for planets, 27

Anderson, Dr. T. C., 8, 142, 143, 144, 146

Anthelm, 142

Apollo, 9

Argon, 109

Ascension, 34

Assumption, forgotten, 196

Astræa, 22, 23, 219

Astrographic chart, 122, 125, 130

<i>Astronomical Journal</i>, 177-217

<i>Astronomische Nachrichten</i>, 52, 158

Astrophil, 143

Auwers, 142


Ball, Sir R., 24[*** New letter=New Section: precede by 2 blank lines.]

Balliol College, 87

Banks, Sir J., 9

Barnard, E. E., 146, 220   [*** No room, or need, for an OVERVIEW; just see comments.]
*/



16 Index 116-01A                 Updated  2011/04/21




INDEX[*** A 2-level, straightforward Index.]


/*
A[*** in an Index, letter "Headings" go INSIDE no-wrap, preceded by 2 blank lines]

Abell, martyred, 358

Adrian, Pope, 105, 107

Alburquerque, Duke of, accompanies Henry to the war, 422

Alençon, Duchess of, proposed marriage of Henry VIII., 116

Alexander VI. (Pope), Borgia, 14

Amelia of Cleves, 322

Angoulême, Duke of, 245

Anne Boleyn, early life, 124-128;[*** semi-colons often separate sub-entries]
  the divorce, 129-162;
  courtship of Henry, 137, 139-147;
  her party, 168-170;
  her life with Henry, 171, 180, 181, 182, 183, 190, 192;
  in France, 193-197;
  married, 199, 202;
  her procession through London, 204-208;
  her unpopularity, 209;
  birth of her child, 214-216, 217, 222, 227, 233;
  her influence declines, 240-243, 244, 257, 260-261;
  her fall inevitable, 269-270, 271;
  her betrayal, 271-274;
  her arrest, 275;
  in the Tower, 276-280;
  her trial, 281;
  condemnation and death, 282-288, 291

Anne of Cleves, 320, 322;
  her voyage to England, 324-330;
  her arrival and interview with Henry, 331-334;
  her marriage, 334-339, 340, 341, 342[** ,] 349, 350-352;
  her repudiation, 353-356, 360, 368;
  talk of her rehabilitation, 386, 387, 397, 409

Aragon, ambition of, 3-5
*/



16 Index 116-02A                 Updated  2011/03/06

[*** This Index was printed almost exactly]
[*** the way we format an Index. Nice & easy.]




INDEX


/*
A

Abandoned river-beds, 302

Abdicated monarchs, 432

Absorption of a State, 127

Abuse of flag, 336

Abyssinia, independence of, 76, 145, 147, 156, 164

Accession to treaties, 568

Accretion of territory:
  abandoned river-beds, 302
  alluvions, 300
  artificial formations, 299
  conception of, 299
  deltas, 300
  different kinds of, 299
  new-born islands, 301

Acosta, 97

Acquisition of territory, 281-284

Acquisition of territory by individuals and corporations, 282

Acts, 551

Adhesion to treaties, 569

Administration of territory by a foreign Power, 232

Aegi, case of, 496

Africa:
  notification of future occupations on the coast of, 294, 590
  preservation of wild animals in, 623

African states, 164, 165
*/



16 Index 116-03A                 Updated  2013/05/19

/*
[*** When a blank line and an opening no-wrap (or Block Quote)  ]
[*** tag both occur at the very top of a page, some people      ]
[*** prefer placing the tag first (as shown here), while others ]
[*** prefer placing the blank line first (outside the block).   ]
[*** Currently (April, 2011), both are acceptable.              ]
 
<i>Agri Decumates</i>, the, annexed, 239.

Agriculture, Italy adapted to, 4;
  changing conditions of, 115;
  development of, under the Principate, 297.

Agrippa, <i>see</i> M. Vipsanius Agrippa.

Agrippina, granddaughter of Augustus, 224, 227;
  plots for the succession, 228;
  condemned to death, 229.

Agrippina, niece and wife of Claudius, schemes of, 232;
  murdered, 233.

<i>Alæ</i>, 45.

Alamanni, the, 256, 259;
  defeated by
*/
[*** In this 2-level index, the last sub-entry on this page     ]
[*** clearly continues on next page (the phrase is incomplete   ]
[*** and has no page number). It isn't hyphenated, so don't use ]
[*** a continuation asterisk, and don't leave a note. The       ]
[*** post-processor will rejoin the rest of the sub-entry from  ]
[*** the next page to the end of this. The next example is      ]
[*** taken from that next page.                                 ]



16 Index 116-04A                 Updated  2014/08/07

[*** This is a continuation of the previous example. It  ]
[*** is next page in the book from which both are taken. ]
[*** The first word and its page number are not indented ]
[*** here because the formatter knew they continue the   ]
[*** sub-entry that began on the previous page.          ]
[*** NOTE: it won't always be obvious whether something  ]
[*** is a new sub-entry or a continuation. Although it   ]
[*** would be best if you find out by looking at the     ]
[*** previous page, it is acceptable to treat this as a  ]
[*** new sub-entry by indenting it.                      ]
/*
Gallienus, 260;
  by Aurelian, 265;
  by Julian, 326;
  by Valens, 329-330;
  by Narses, 378.

Alans, the, invasions of, with the Vandals, 355.

Alaric, prince of the Visigoths, invasion of Greece, 352-353;
  invasion of Italy, 353.

Alba Longa, 29.
*/



16 Index 116-05A                 Updated  2013/05/19

/*

<sc>Wilkinson, General</sc>, facts stated in relation to his conduct, 642;
  [*** primary entry above not shown in this example's page image; other entries omitted]
  not shown that the House possesses the powers to proceed in the business, 652;
  effect of this motion is to hold this man up to suspicion for years to come, 652;
  if an improper [*** text omitted from this example] has placed it, 653;
  other tribunals than this House;
*/
[*** This entry and its sub-entries are shown only to clarify the next example: the  ]
[*** end of this page coincides with the end of a sub-entry that is followed by a    ]
[*** semi-colon (not a period or empty space), so whatever is at the top of the next ]
[*** page will be a new sub-entry within this main entry.                            ]



16 Index 116-06A                 Updated  2013/05/19

[*** top of page--no blank line]
/*
  resolution offered to refer the papers, &c., to the Secretary of War, 654;
  the power of the House is called in question, 654;
  the resolution, in plain terms, is to denounce the man, 654;
[*** rest of page omitted]
*/
[*** This is a new sub-entry of the main entry that began on the previous page,  ]
[*** so it is NOT preceded by a blank line, because it's a sub-entry, but it IS  ]
[*** indented by 2 spaces, because it is the beginning of a sub-entry and not a  ]
[*** continuation of one (that was shown in examples 03A-04A).                   ]
[*** If you formatted the previous page, you would know that, but otherwise, the ]
[*** only way to know whether it's a new sub-entry or a continuation is to look  ]
[*** at the previous page. You can do that from 'Page Details' on the Project    ]
[*** page.                                                                       ]
[***                                                                             ]
[*** To summarize:                                                               ]
[*** 1. a main entry is preceded by a blank line (or two blank lines if it is    ]
[***    the first one in its letter group and there is no 'heading' letter) and  ]
[***    is left-justified                                                        ]
[*** 2. a sub-entry is NOT preceded by a blank line, and is indented by two,     ]
[***    four, etc. spaces, depending on its nesting level. Most Indexes have     ]
[***    only one or two levels.                                                  ]
[*** 3. when a sub-entry begins at the top of a page (like this one), rule #2    ]
[***    applies: indent it but do not precede it with any blank lines.           ]
[*** 4. when a sub-entry begins on one page and continues on the next page,      ]
[***    don't do anything special with the first part, don't indent the          ]
[***    continuation, and don't precede it with a blank line.                    ]



16 Index 116-07A                 Updated  2013/05/27

[*** This Index already is structured the way we]
[*** do them; just replace the dots with a comma]
[*** and indent the sub-entries by 2 spaces.    ]
[*** We must add the commas if they are missing,]
[*** because they indicate that the page numbers]
[*** follow.                                    ]
[*** (And in this case, mark those small-caps.) ]




INDEX


/*
<sc>Bakery and Breakfast Dishes</sc>
  Baked Corn Pie, 198
  Boston Brown Bread, 201
  Corn Gems, 196
  Corn Bread, 199, 200
  Gems, 196, 197
  Granose Puffs, 197
  Griddle Cakes, 198
  Georgia Pones, 201
  Hoe Cake, 199
  Popovers, 198
  Vegetarian Hot Cakes, 197

<sc>Beverages</sc>
  Apollinaris Lemonade, 176
  Caramel-Cereal, 173
  Chocolate, 173
*/



16 Index 116-08A                 Updated  2013/05/13

/*

Sexes, their separation in church, 336. 566.

Sexton office in one family, 171. 502.

Seymour (Elizabeth), daughter of Sir Edward, 174. 313.

Shakspeare, on his descent from a landed proprietor, 75. 154. 479.

---- digest on critical readings, 540.

---- Othello annotated, 375. 577.

---- Passionate Pilgrim and Griffin's Fidessa, 27.

---- portrait, 571.

---- Rime which he made at the Mytre, 439.

---- Stratford Shakspeare, 90.

Sharers at theatres, 199.

*Sheffield, Earl of Mulgrave, letter by him, 373.

Shelley's Prometheus Unbound, 351. 481.

Sheridan (Richard Brinsley), his patrimony, 447.

---- translation of a song in his Duenna, 59.

*Sheriff of Somersetshire in 1765, 173.
*/

[*** In an Index or Bibliography, an entry beginning with a   ]
[*** long dash is a first-level entry, not a sub-entry, so it ]
[*** should be left-justified and preceded by a blank line.   ]
[*** The long dash, which we represent with 4 hyphens, is     ]
[*** like ditto marks, and stands for the first words of the  ]
[*** entry just above: "Shakspeare," in the first instance    ]
[*** and "Sheridan (Richard Brinsley)," in the second.        ]
[*** (The asterisks are part of the text and should be        ]
[*** retained as-is.)                                         ]



16 Index 116-09A                 Updated  2013/05/19

/*

Blunt, Mr. Wilfrid, i. 261

Borthwick, Sir A., i. 258; ii. 431

Bradford speeches, ii. 175, 177

Budget:
  amendment (1885), i. 398, 405
  work of, i. 143, 149, 230; ii. 150
*/
[*** This is from an index for a two-volume set. Such   ]
[*** indexes are printed in different ways, but all of  ]
[*** them will have a way of indicating the Volume to   ]
[*** which the page(s) refer. For formatters, what      ]
[*** matters is that the entire list of pages for any   ]
[*** entry or sub-entry should be on the same line as   ]
[*** that entry (or sub-entry), even if a semi-colon is ]
[*** used to separate the pages of one volume from      ]
[*** those of the next. In this context, the semi-colon ]
[*** does not mean a new sub-entry is about to start,   ]
[*** and we do not put the rest of the list on a new    ]
[*** line.                                              ]
[***                                                    ]
[*** In this example, "Blunt" has just one reference,   ]
[*** and it's to volume i. "Borthwick" has two          ]
[*** references, one to each volume, separated by a     ]
[*** semi-colon. Both references go on the same line.   ]
[*** "Bradford" has two references, both of which are   ]
[*** to volume ii. "Budget" has two sub-entries:        ]
[*** "amendment" has two references, both in volume i,  ]
[*** while "work of" has references to both volumes.    ]
[*** The semi-colon in its list does not mark the       ]
[*** beginning of a new sub-entry: in this context,     ]
[*** it's just a separator in the reference list.       ]



16 Index 116-10A                 Updated  2014/08/10

/*

Arsha rite, i, 198, 220.

Arunta: sexual customs of, i, 50 n. 2, 75, 76 and n. 3, 170, note.

Aryans, the early:
  two stages in rise of juridical conceptions of, i, 24-26;
  house-*hold among, 26, 27;
  housewife, 27 n. 2;
  whether paternal or maternal system, 18-27.
  (<i>See</i> India, Hindus.)
*/
[*** This index was printed differently from most others: in the second    ]
[*** entry, 'Arunta' is followed by a colon instead of the usual comma;    ]
[*** and in the third entry, the main entry has no page numbers, just a    ]
[*** colon. When a colon is used, the sub-entries normally begin on their  ]
[*** own lines, so we must decide where to put these first sub-entries.    ]
[***                                                                       ]
[*** If the Project Comments or Discussion don't address this, it's best   ]
[*** to ASK (as always). If no answer is given, use the procedure below    ]
[*** and explain in the Project Discussion what you've done, so others     ]
[*** either will do it the same way or explain why they think it should    ]
[*** be done differently. Our objective is to format in a consistent way   ]
[*** that also is consistent with the Guidelines.                          ]
[***                                                                       ]
[*** In most indexes, the colon after 'Arunta' in the second entry would   ]
[*** be a comma (to make 'Arunta' alphabetize where people expect to find  ]
[*** it), so 'sexual customs of' is not a sub-entry, but just part of the  ]
[*** main entry, all of which belongs on one line, as shown above.         ]
[***                                                                       ]
[*** The colon in the third entry definitely precedes a list of            ]
[*** sub-entries.  The Guidlines tell us to start each one on a new line,  ]
[*** preceded by two spaces, as shown above.  However, when this index was ]
[*** formatted, everyone placed such first sub-entries (e.g., 'two stages  ]
[*** in rise of...') on the same line as the main entry, probably because  ]
[*** it "matched the scan" and just seemed to be the natural way to do it. ]
[*** And that's why ASKING and DISCUSSING things is so important.          ]
[***                                                                       ]
[*** ********************************************************************* ]
[*** Here's a summary of a way to identify and position sub-entries:       ]
[*** 1. If all sub-entries already are printed on lines of their own,      ]
[***    leave them that way, regardless of what punctuation follows the    ]
[***    main entry.                                                        ]
[*** 2. If the main entry doesn't have its own page list and there's just  ]
[***    one thing that looks like a sub-entry, "match the scan": keep it   ]
[***    on its original line, indented if it's on a line of its own.       ]
[*** 3. If the main entry has its own list of pages, or there are multiple ]
[***    sub-entries, position each sub-entry, including the first, on its  ]
[***    own line, indented by 2 spaces.                                    ]
[*** 4. Second-level sub-entries should be indented by 4 spaces; higher    ]
[***    levels (very rare) by 6, 8, etc. spaces.                           ]



16 Index 116-11A                 Updated  2020/10/30

/*

Wesley, Rev. Charles, 31, 32, 35-38, 41, 42, 44, 45, 47, 48, 50, 51, 55, 57, 62-64, 66, 76, 78-80, 84, 89-91, 96, 97, 129, 132, 141, 142, 152, 172, 180, 222, 285, 310, 327, 328, 346, 359-362, 367, 402, 433, 484, 511, 544, 556, 557, 565
*/
[*** As the Formatting Guidelines explain, Index entries should be unwrapped into single lines, ]
[*** REGARDLESS OF THEIR LENGTHS. This screenshot is not nearly wide enough to show the entire  ]
[*** very long line that resulted from doing that with this example.                            ]
[***                                                                                            ]
[*** Earlier examples showed lengthy Index entries that included sub-entries, usually separated ]
[*** by semi-colons. Sub-entries begin on new lines, indented and single-spaced. The current    ]
[*** example contains no sub-entries, so just keep unwrapping it until it's one very long line. ]



17 Correspondence 117-00A                 Updated  2011/06/17




[*** Project Comments: each letter is a Chapter.]
[*** Enclose right-justified lines in no-wrap.]
/*
<sc>Brantwood, Coniston</sc>,[*** comma OUTSIDE,]
<i>23rd June, 1879</i>.[*** period OUTSIDE,]
[*** but include numbers in the italics.]
*/

[*** comma OUTSIDE.]
<sc>Dear Mr. Malleson</sc>,--Walking, and
talking, are now alike impossible to
[*** Middle of letter removed to save space]

Is not this the first of all questions
which a Clerical Council has to answer
in open terms?

[*** Special indentation, then right-justification.]
[*** Use one pair of no-wraps for both lines.]
/*
Ever affectionately yours,[*** comma, so]
<sc>J. Ruskin</sc>.[*** period goes OUTSIDE.]
*/

[*** OVERVIEW OF CORRESPONDENCE:                             ]
[*** The typical components of a letter are the "heading,"   ]
[*** "greeting" (or "salutation"), "body," "complementary    ]
[*** closing," and "signature" (with an occasional P.S.).    ]
[*** The heading, which typically includes an address and    ]
[*** date, and/or is center-right aligned, needs to be in    ]
[*** no-wrap. If the greeting is on its own line, it also    ]
[*** may need to be in (a shared) no-wrap; if it needs       ]
[*** in-line formatting and is followed by a comma or colon, ]
[*** that punctuation goes OUTSIDE the markup. The closing   ]
[*** and signature usually have non-standard alignment and   ]
[*** need to be in (a shared) no-wrap. If they are on the    ]
[*** same line, we usually change that to separate lines.    ]
[*** When a letter is being presented in a book, there may   ]
[*** be an identifying Title that is not part of the letter, ]
[*** so if the letter needs to be in a block quote, that     ]
[*** identifier should NOT be in the block quote.            ]
[*** A Project's Comments may specify that each letter is    ]
[*** a Chapter or a Section; or the white space and context  ]
[*** may make that apparent. If in doubt, ASK.               ]



17 Correspondence 117-01A                 Updated  2011/05/04

The Duke's letter of apology is full of calm
dignity, but one regrets that the accusation was
not dismissed with a show, at least, of righteous
indignation.

[*** Block quotes around this letter. It's in a]
[*** smaller font and surrounded by blank lines.]
/#
/*
[*** Use No-wrap to signal right-justification.]
[*** Currently (May, 2011), a blank line is]
[*** OPTIONAL between an opening BQ and an opening]
[*** no-wrap, and NOT USED between their closings.]
[*** The Project Comments may specify a preference.]
<sc>London</sc>, Jan. 13, 1835.
*/

[*** Abbreviation; period INSIDE. Comma means]
[*** salutation is not a complete sentence,]
[*** so the comma goes OUTSIDE the markups.]
<sc>My dear Miss J.</sc>,--I beg your pardon if I have
written a line or used an expression which could annoy
you. Believe me; it is the thing of all others that I
would wish to avoid! And that there is nobody more
strongly impressed than I am with veneration for your
Virtues, attainments and Sentiments!

[*** Special indentation. Just enclose all]
[*** of these in one pair of no-wraps.]
/*
Believe me Ever Yours

Most sincerely,

<sc>Wellington</sc>.[*** Post-Processor wanted]
[*** blank line above Name. If in doubt, ASK.]
[*** Move signature to separate line, rather than]
[*** using 6 spaces. It's not a complete]
[*** sentence ("sincerely," has a comma), so]
[*** the period goes OUTSIDE.]
*/
#/[*** No blank line between these closing tags.]

This quarrel is of chief interest as indicating
that Miss J.'s anxiety for the Duke's soul was



17 Correspondence 117-02A                 Updated  2013/04/07

[*** Each letter in this Project is a new Section.]


[*** This heading identifies the letter. It isn't part of the letter.]
[<sc>Letter of Philip V. Fithian to the Reverend[** bold?]
Andrew Hunter</sc>]

[*** This letter was not enclosed in Block Quotes. The Project is a collection of letters and Diary entries,]
[*** and the Project Manager did not request Block Quotes for each entry.]
[*** Date is right-justified, so use no-wrap.]
/*
Nomini-Hall, Virginia. June 3d. 1774.

<sc>Revd: & Dear Sir.</sc>[*** Complete sentence, period INSIDE]
*/

It will not be wonderful if I inform you that this Colony is in
great tumult and confusion. The general Voice is <i>Boston</i>. You will
have heard before the reception of this, that the Governor dissolved
the Assembly in this province on their making a resolve to keep
[*** (image and text omitted to save space)]

Please to make my compliments to Mrs Hunter, Miss Nancy,
Andrew, and to Uncles family--I am, sir

/*
Your most obedient[*** extra white space between these 2 lines]
 
Most humble Servt:

<sc>Philip V. Fithian</sc>[*** all 3 lines can go in same no-wrap]
*/



17 Correspondence 117-03A                 Updated  2014/05/03

military skill and heroic endeavor.

A week after his resignation was written Jackson,
overwhelmed by appeals to remain in the service,
wrote to Governor Letcher as follows:

/#[*** There's extra white space (a blank line) between the regular text and the letter, so enclose it in Block Quotes.                 ]
/*[*** A blank line between the opening Block Quote and opening no-wrap is optional unless specified in the Project Comments.           ]
February 6, 1862[*** the date is right-justified, so enclose it in no-wraps.                                                            ]
*/

Governor:--Your letter of the 4th inst. was received
this morning. If my retiring from the army would produce
the effect upon our country that you have named in your
letter, I, of course, could not desire to leave the service, and
if, upon receipt of this note, your opinion remains unchanged,
you are authorized to withdraw my resignation unless the
Secretary of War desires that it should be accepted. My
reasons for resigning were set forth in my letter of the
31st ult. and my views remain unchanged; and <i>if the Secretary
persists in the ruinous policy complained of I feel that
no officer can serve his country better than by making his
strongest possible protest against it, which, in my opinion,
is done by tendering his resignation, rather than be a willing
instrument in prosecuting the war upon a ruinous principle</i>.[*** Text in italics is not a complete sentence, so period goes OUTSIDE. ]
#/

This then was the situation. Stonewall Jackson,
with a miserably inferior force, was holding the Valley
throughout a long winter, and detaining there a
[*** This letter is preceded and followed by extra white space (blank lines), so it must be enclosed in Block Quotes. Sometimes, a      ]
[*** letter may be printed across 2 or more pages, and the "extra white space" on one of those pages (usually the one where the letter  ]
[*** begins) may not be obvious. In general, letters in the middle of other text need to be enclosed in Block Quotes, especially when   ]
[*** they begin with dates and/or end with signatures.  If the situation is questionable, looking at the "other" page may be helpful.   ]



17 Correspondence 117-04A                 Updated  2014/05/04

minute study of the storm. She was on the alert to
detect anything which might lead her to correct her
description.

Of this new story Charles Summer wrote from the
senate chamber:--

/#
<sc>My dear Mrs. Stowe</sc>,--I am rejoiced to learn,
from your excellent sister here, that you are occupied
with another tale exposing slavery. I feel that it will
act directly upon pending questions, and help us in our
struggle for Kansas, and also to overthrow the slave-oligarchy
in the coming Presidential election. We
need your help at once in our struggle.

/*
Ever sincerely yours,
<sc>Charles Sumner</sc>.[*** move signature to its own line]
*/
#/

Having finished this second great story of slavery, in
the early summer of 1856 Mrs. Stowe decided to visit
Europe again, in search of a much-needed rest. She
[*** Even though this letter is printed with the same margins and same font size as the other ]
[*** text on the page, it's preceded and followed by extra white space (blank lines), so we   ]
[*** enclose it in Block Quotes.                                                              ]



17 Correspondence 117-05A                 Updated  2011/03/06

[*** Project Comments said each letter is a Chapter]




CXXXIV.--TO FANNY KEATS.
[*** Heading identifies letter; it isn't part of it.]


/*[*** show right-justification]
Wentworth Place [February 11, 1820].
*/

My dear Fanny--I am much the same as when I last
wrote. I hope a little more verging towards improvement.
Yesterday morning being very fine, I took a walk
for a quarter of an hour in the garden and was very much
refresh'd by it. You must consider no news, good news--if
you do not hear from me the day after to-morrow.

Your affectionate Brother[*** same indentation as new ¶]

[*** Move signature to its own line, show right-justified]
/*
<sc>John</sc>.
[*** signature part of "sentence", so period goes OUTSIDE]
*/



18 Signatures 118-00A                 Updated  2011/04/15

of men and women, the searcher of hearts,
the weaver of strange webs of destiny. I can
only trust that, by diligence in seeking for the
best interpretation of his thoughts, I have paid
some part of my debt to that great spirit, and to
the glorious country that gave him birth.

[*** Right-justified, so enclose in no-wrap.]
[*** Small-caps, with period INSIDE.]
/*
<sc>William Archer.</sc>
*/

[*** OVERVIEW OF SIGNATURES:]
[*** Signatures occur in many contexts: letters, Prefaces (such as this example),   ]
[*** dedications, citations, and as attributions at the end of poetry or verse.     ]
[*** 1. Left-justify them, even if they are indented or right-aligned in the Image. ]
[*** 2. They almost always need to be enclosed in no-wrap, because they're          ]
[***    usually indented, but not the way paragraphs are indented.                  ]
[*** 3. When there is a "complimentary closing" (e.g., "Y'r obedient servant,"      ]
[***    or dates, all of those lines usually can go in the same pair of no-wraps.   ]
[*** 4. When they are on the same line as the "closing," move the signature         ]
[***    to a line of its own, possibly even leaving a blank line between them.      ]
[*** 5. If a signature is in small-caps (or italics), mark it that way. If          ]
[***    there's also a period after it, determine whether the signature is          ]
[***    part of a "sentence" or is its own "sentence." In practice, this means      ]
[***    looking at what precedes it to see whether there's a comma or a period.     ]
[***    If the preceding punctuation is a period, then the period after the         ]
[***    signature goes INSIDE the in-line markup; if the preceding punctuation is   ]
[***    a comma, then the period after the signature belongs to the overall         ]
[***    "sentence" and the period goes OUTSIDE the in-line markup.                  ]



18 Signatures 118-01A                 Updated  2011/04/21

I wish to acknowledge my general indebtedness to Professor W. S.
Ferguson of Harvard University for his guidance in my approach
to the study of Roman History, and also my particular obligations
to Professor W. L. Westermann of Cornell, and to my colleagues,
Professors A. L. Cross and J. G. Winter, for reading portions of
my manuscript and for much helpful criticism.

[*** one set of no-wraps is sufficient.]
/*
<sc>A. E. R. Boak.</sc>

University of Michigan,
October, 1921
*/



18 Signatures 118-02A                 Updated  2011/04/21

Astronomical Society, the Astronomer Royal, the
editors of <i>The Observatory</i>, the Cambridge
University Press, the Harvard College Observatory,
the Yerkes Observatory, and the living
representatives of two portraits.

/*
H. H. TURNER.

[*** Some small-caps, some italics, so the ending comma and the period both go OUTSIDE.]
[*** However, the comma within the address is part of the address and goes INSIDE.]
<sc>University Observatory, Oxford</sc>,
<i>November 9, 1904</i>.
*/



18 Signatures 118-03A                 Updated  2011/04/21

Above every one else, in writing this book, the author
is under obligations to his wife, without whose constant
help and encouragement it could not have been written.

/*
DAVID P. BARROWS.
 
[*** Here, the entire "sentence" is in small-caps, so the period and the commas all go]
[*** INSIDE one set of markups. Leave a blank line between the signature and address.]
<sc>Manila, Philippine Islands,
March 1st, 1903.</sc>
*/



18 Signatures 118-04A                 Updated  2011/04/13




II[*** Project Comments say each Letter is a Chapter.]


[*** Enclose right-justified lines in no-wrap.]
/*
<sc>Brantwood, Coniston</sc>,[*** comma OUTSIDE,]
<i>23rd June, 1879</i>.[*** period OUTSIDE,]
[*** but include numerals in the italics.]
*/

[*** comma OUTSIDE.]
<sc>Dear Mr. Malleson</sc>,--Walking, and
talking, are now alike impossible to
me;[A] my strength is gone for both;
nor do I believe talking on such matters
to be of the least use except to promote,
between sensible people, kindly
feeling and knowledge of each other's
personal characters. I have every
[*** Middle of letter removed to save space]

Is not this the first of all questions
which a Clerical Council has to answer
in open terms?

[*** Special indentation, then right-justification.]
[*** Use one pair of no-wraps for both lines.]
/*
Ever affectionately yours,[*** comma here, so]
<sc>J. Ruskin</sc>.[*** period goes OUTSIDE.]
*/

[Footnote A: In answer to the proposal of discussing the
subject during a mountain walk.]



18 Signatures 118-05A                 Updated  2014/03/08

Accept my thanks for the honor of your invitation,
and believe me, dear Sir,

/*
Faithfully yours,

<sc>Charles Sumner</sc>.
*/

/#
<sc>A. W. Harvey, Esq.</sc>
#/
[*** Enclose the signature area in no-wraps; left-justify ]
[*** all of its lines. Since there's extra white space    ]
[*** between "Faithfully yours," and "Charles Sumner",    ]
[*** leave a blank line in the text.                      ]
[***                                                      ]
[*** "A. W. Harvey, Esq." is in a smaller font than the   ]
[*** letter or signature, so mark it separately, using    ]
[*** Block quotes. If it had been in the same font size,  ]
[*** we would include it in the same no-wraps as the      ]
[*** signature area.                                      ]



19 Title_Page 119-00A                 Updated  2011/04/13




/*
THE DRAMAS
OF
VICTOR HUGO

MARY TUDOR

MARION DE LORME

ESMERALDA

Profusely Illustrated with Elegant
Wood Engravings

<i>VOLUME TWENTY-ONE</i>

NEW YORK
<sc>Peter Fenelon Collier, Publisher</sc>
*/

[*** OVERVIEW OF TITLE PAGES:                ]
[*** There's no point in trying to match     ]
[*** the layout of the Image, as the         ]
[*** Post-Processor will re-do it her/his    ]
[*** way. So, just leave 4 blank lines at    ]
[*** the top, ENCLOSE EVERYTHING IN NO-WRAP, ]
[*** place blank lines where they seem to be ]
[*** needed, and BE SURE TO DO               ]
[*** ALL OF THE NEEDED IN-LINE MARKUPS.      ]
[*** If there's an illustration on the       ]
[*** page, tag it ... even if it's just      ]
[*** the publisher's colophon.               ]
[*** On Title pages, as in Chapter headings, ]
[*** ignore horizontal rules: they're not    ]
[*** Thought Breaks.                         ]



19 Title_Page 119-01A                 Updated  2011/04/13




/*
THE WORKS
OF
CHRISTOPHER MARLOWE

EDITED BY
A. H. BULLEN, B.A.

IN THREE VOLUMES

VOLUME THE SECOND

[Illustration]

LONDON

JOHN C. NIMMO
14, KING WILLIAM STREET, STRAND, W.C.

MDCCCLXXXV[*** all upper-case, not small-caps]
*/



19 Title_Page 119-02A                 Updated  2011/04/13




/*
KING COLE

BY

JOHN MASEFIELD

WITH DRAWINGS IN BLACK AND WHITE

BY

JUDITH MASEFIELD

New York
[*** ignore Black Letter unless]
[*** Project Comments or Manager says otherwise]

THE MACMILLAN COMPANY

1921

<i>All rights reserved</i>
*/



19 Title_Page 119-03A                 Updated  2011/03/06




/*
<sc>Fifty Contemporary
One-Act Plays</sc>

<sc>Selected and Edited</sc>

BY

FRANK SHAY

AND

PIERRE LOVING

[Illustration]

CINCINNATI

STEWART & KIDD COMPANY

PUBLISHERS
*/



20 Front_Matter 120-00A                 Updated  2011/04/30




/*
<sc>Copyright 1908 By
Frank Justus Miller</sc>


All Rights Reserved


Published September 1908
Second Impression April 1913
Third Impression March 1917
Fourth Impression January 1920
Fifth Impression August 1924


Composed and Printed By

The University of Chicago Press

Chicago[** ,?] Illinois U S A
*/

[*** OVERVIEW OF "FRONT MATTER"                ]
[*** "Front Matter" includes everything before ]
[*** "Chapter 1," except for pages that have   ]
[*** their own topics: Title page, Table       ]
[*** of Contents, and Table of Illustrations.  ]
[*** Treat each part of the Front Matter as a  ]
[*** new Major Division: put 4 blank lines     ]
[*** just above them.                          ]
[*** Why: In a printed book, these "Major      ]
[*** Divisions" start on new pages: Titles,    ]
[*** dedications, Copyright notices, etc.      ]
[*** We mark these divisions by preceding      ]
[*** them with 4 blank lines. Format an        ]
[*** Introduction or Preface like a Chapter,   ]
[*** and use no-wrap around almost everything  ]
[*** else. AND REMEMBER TO DO THE IN-LINE      ]
[*** FORMATTING! That's most important of all. ]



20 Front_Matter 120-00B                 Updated  2015/02/03




/*
COPYRIGHT, 1903, BY
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY


Copyright, 1903, by Harper & Brothers
Copyright, 1903, by J. B. Lippincott Company
PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
*/
[*** The Copyright page is "Front Matter", so enclose it   ]
[*** in no-wraps.  It's a Major Division, so precede the   ]
[*** no-wraps with four blank lines.  You may leave either ]
[*** one or two blank lines between the top and bottom     ]
[*** parts.                                                ]
[***                                                       ]
[*** Since all of the words on the first and last lines    ]
[*** are the same size, we cannot tell whether or not they ]
[*** should be in small-caps, and leave them untagged, as  ]
[*** though it's just a font-size change. For the same     ]
[*** reason, we ignore the larger numbers in the first     ]
[*** line.                                                 ]



20 Front_Matter 120-01A                 Updated  2011/04/13




KING COLE[*** no need for no-wrap]



20 Front_Matter 120-02A                 Updated  2011/07/29




/*
<i>To</i>
<sc>My Wife</sc>
*/
[*** No-wrap needed to keep them as 2 lines.]
[*** Alternately, a blank line between them ]
[*** will work just as well, and is simpler.]



20 Front_Matter 120-03A                 Updated  2013/04/07




ERRATA


/*
Page 133, line 27, <i>for</i> "200 stars" <i>read</i> "200 stars per hour."

  "  145. See note on page 220.

  "  146, bottom of page. This nebulosity was first discovered by
             Dr. Max Wolf of Heidelberg. See <i>Astr. Nachr. 3736[**part of title?]</i>.

  "  181, line 17, <i>for</i> "observation" <i>read</i> "aberration."
*/
[*** This is in no-wraps because of the ditto marks. If there were no ditto marks,   ]
[*** these lines would be in block quotes and the "Dr. Max Wolf" line would be       ]
[*** left-justified, as the sentence is wrappable.                                   ]
[*** "3736" is included in the italics tags on the assumption that it's part of the  ]
[*** name of the publication, but the note will make it the post-processor's choice. ]



20 Front_Matter 120-04A                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** Wrappable text, so don't use "no-wrap"; and since it's all by itself, don't use Block Quote.]




<i>In reproducing these letters we have followed as nearly as possible the original
manuscripts. This inevitably has caused a certain lack of uniformity throughout
the volume, as in the case of the names of magazines and newspapers, which
are sometimes italicized and sometimes in quotation marks.</i>--<sc>The Editor.</sc>


COPYRIGHT, 1922, BY THE CALIFORNIA BOOK CLUB



20 Front_Matter 120-05A                 Updated  2011/07/29




<i>Printed by</i> <sc>Ballantyne, Hanson & Co</sc>

<i>At the Ballantyne Press</i>



20 Front_Matter 120-06A                 Updated  2011/04/30




PREFACE


This sketch of the History of Rome to 565 <sc>A.D.</sc> is primarily
intended to meet the needs of introductory college courses in Roman
History. However, it is hoped that it may also prove of service as
a handbook for students of Roman life and literature in general. It
is with the latter in mind that I have added the bibliographical note.
Naturally, within the brief limits of such a text, it was impossible
to defend the point of view adopted on disputed points or to take
notice of divergent opinions. Therefore, to show the great debt which
I owe to the work of others, and to provide those interested in
particular problems with some guide to more detailed study, I have
given a list of selected references, which express, I believe, the prevailing
views of modern scholarship upon the various phases of
Roman History.

I wish to acknowledge my general indebtedness to Professor W. S.
Ferguson of Harvard University for his guidance in my approach
to the study of Roman History, and also my particular obligations
to Professor W. L. Westermann of Cornell, and to my colleagues,
Professors A. L. Cross and J. G. Winter, for reading portions of
my manuscript and for much helpful criticism.

/*
<sc>A. E. R. Boak.</sc>

University of Michigan,
October, 1921
*/



20 Front_Matter 120-07A                 Updated  2011/02/26




THE WIVES OF HENRY THE
EIGHTH



20 Front_Matter 120-08A                 Updated  2011/04/14




JOINT PUBLISHING COMMITTEE REPRESENTING THE LONDON COUNTY
COUNCIL AND THE COMMITTEE FOR THE SURVEY OF THE MEMORIALS
OF GREATER LONDON.


/*
[*** Proofers converted page to simple lists.]
<i>Chairman.</i>

E. L. MEINERTZHAGEN.


<i>Members appointed by the Council.</i>

GRANVILLE-SMITH, R. W.
JOHNSON, W. C.
MEINERTZHAGEN, E. L.
TAYLOR, ANDREW T.


<i>Members appointed by the Survey Committee.</i>

GODFREY, WALTER H.
LOVELL, PERCY.
NORMAN, PHILIP.
*/



20 Front_Matter 120-09A                 Updated  2011/04/13




Authors and Collaborators


JAMES BRAY GRIFFITH, <i>Managing Editor</i>

/#[*** Indented Hanging Indents, marked with Block Quotes. Decorative separators were ignored.]
Head, Dept. of Commerce, Accountancy, and Business Administration, American School
of Correspondence.
#/


ROBERT H. MONTGOMERY

/#
Of the Firm of Lybrand, Ross Bros. & Montgomery, Certified Public Accountants.

Editor of the American Edition of Dicksee's <i>Auditing</i>.

Formerly Lecturer on Auditing at the Evening School of Accounts and Finance of the
University of Pennsylvania, and the School of Commerce, Accounts, and Finance of
the New York University.
#/


ARTHUR LOWES DICKINSON, F. C. A., C. P. A.

/#
Of the Firms of Jones, Caesar, Dickinson, Wilmot & Company, Certified Public Accountants,
and Price, Waterhouse & Company, Chartered Accountants.
#/



21 Tables 121-00A                 Updated  2011/04/13

The wind velocities were as follows:--

[*** A simple table, no gridlines. Line up data and enclose]
[*** in no-wrap.]
/*
At the start            10 miles per hour
   "   first mark       15  "        "
   "   second mark      22  "        "
   "   finish           29  "        "
*/

On the fourth day, October 11, the start was delayed, the
competitors hoping for wind, but it was made at 1.45. Course,

[*** "Tables" is a more advanced topic than most of the       ]
[*** others in this Library, so there will be only a few      ]
[*** simple examples here. The Forum has several in-depth     ]
[*** discussions of tables, and a "Gallery of Table Layouts." ]
[*** Please refer to them for further examples.               ]



21 Tables 121-01A                 Updated  2011/04/18

5 mins. 53 secs. One of the members of the Committee took
the velocity of the wind at different periods of the race, as
follows:--

[*** Another simple table. Someone correctly moved the second half of the table below]
[*** the first. If you get a table like this, and it hasn't already been rearranged,]
[*** please do that when formatting it.]
/*
         Velocity
h.  m.   per hour
11  25   10
 1  56   14·5
 2   3    9
 3  23    9
 3  35    8·8
*/

It will be well to remember that here velocity does not
indicate strength as we feel it at home. As Lord Dunraven
particularly noticed, the dryness of the wind reduces the
pressure, which the moisture of our climate so materially
increases.



21 Tables 121-02A                 Updated  2011/04/18

Some impression of the continuing growth in this
field can be gained from the following data.


[*** Leaving an extra blank line above the heading helps to separate it from the regular]
[*** text. The explanation is wrappable.]
<sc>Phosphate Rock</sc>

annually "sold or used by producer" in the United States
in million long tons (2,240 lbs.)

/*
1880    0.2
1890    0.5
1900    1.5
1910    2.655
1920    4.104
1930    3.926
*/



21 Tables 121-03A                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** A fairly simple table with gridlines. The column headings are all-caps, not small-caps.   ]
[*** Use hyphens, NOT underscores, for horizontal lines, and use equals signs for double lines.]
[*** Use plus signs + at the intersections of horizontal and vertical lines.                   ]
[*** Match the outside borders of the Image: this one has top and bottom borders, but no sides.]
[*** If possible, make the width under 75 characters, but some tables are much wider than that.]

/*
-------------------+-------------------------+-------------------------
                   |     TOTAL VALUE OF      |     TOTAL VALUE OF
                   |   EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC   |       IMPORTS OF
       PORTS       |       MERCHANDISE       |       MERCHANDISE
  OF THE PACIFIC.  |     FOR YEAR ENDING     |     FOR YEAR ENDING
                   +------------+------------+------------+------------
                   |  JUNE 30,  |  JUNE 30,  |  JUNE 30,  |  JUNE 30,
                   |   1885.    |   1887.    |   1885.    |   1887.
-------------------+------------+------------+------------+------------
Humboldt, Cal.     | $  201,500 |            | $    1,731 |
Oregon             |  1,928,829 |            |    161,170 |
Puget Sound, W. T. |  1,877,485 |            |    238,036 |
San Diego, Cal.    |     65,654 |            |     71,106 |
San Francisco, Cal.| 37,082,520 |$32,027,995 | 35,040,350 |$40,707,708
Willamette, Oregon |  4,142,156 |            |    277,386 |
Wilmington, Cal.   |    252,673 |            |    187,348 |
                   +------------+------------+------------+------------
                   |$45,550,817 |            |$35,977,127 |
-------------------+------------+------------+------------+------------
*/



21 Tables 121-04A                 Updated  2011/03/07

/*
---------------------------+-----------+----------+----------------------
                           |           |  Number  |
                           |   Number  |    of    |       Returns
           Form.           |  of Forms |   Towns  |      collected
                           |dealt with.|from which|         by
                           |           | received.|
---------------------------+-----------+----------+----------------------
Prices (Food)           A  |    450    |   250 }  |
Prices (Food, Fuel and     |           |       }  |Post Office, Ministry
  Light and Sundries)   B 2|    436    |   220 }  |   of Labour, and
Prices (Meat)           B 3|    434    |   227 }  |   Local Government
Prices (Clothing)       B 4|    436    |   216 }  |   Board Officials.
Rents                   B 5|     91    |    71    |Rate Collectors and
                           |           |          |   Town Clerks.
---------------------------+-----------+----------+----------------------
*/



21 Tables 121-05A                 Updated  2011/04/18

Top Seam, No. 4, descending:
[*** A simple list that is also a simple table. Remove the dots, align the columns,]
[*** make sure at least one line of list is left-justified, and enclose in no-wrap.]

/*
Roof, rich Bituminous Black Slate,
  containing streaks of--          FT.   INS.
  Coal                              2     3
  Bone                              0     1-1/2
  Coal                              0     7
  Slate, variable                   0     0-1/2
  Coal                              0    11
  Clay                              0     0-1/2
  Coal                              2     0
  Clay, variable                    0     1-3/4
  Coal                              1     1
  Clay, mining                      0     3
  Coal                              1     1
                                 ----------
                Total, good         6 ft. 3-1/4 ins.
*/



21 Tables 121-06A                 Updated  2011/03/10


PRINCIPAL EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE,
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1885.

/*
[*** A fairly simple table. Adding blank lines between port-names]
[*** makes it more readable, and we are allowed some latitude with]
[*** tables.]
-------------------+------------+-------------------------------------
   PORTS ON THE    | APPROXIMATE|
     PACIFIC.      |   VALUES.  |
-------------------+------------+-------------------------------------
Humboldt, Cal.     | $  165,000 | Wood, and Manufactures of.
                   |            |
                   |{ 1,493,600 | Canned Salmon.
Oregon, Oregon     |{   400,000 | Wheat and Flour.
                   |{    32,000 | Wood, and Manufactures of.
                   |            |
                   |{   830,000 | Wood, and Manufactures of.
Puget Sound, W. T. |{   240,000 | Wheat and Flour.
                   |{   160,000 | Animals.
                   |            |
                   |{    58,000 | Animals.
San Diego, Cal.    |{     4,000 | Wood, and Manufactures of.
                   |{     1,800 | Machinery.
                   |            |
                   |{27,226,000 | Wheat, Flour, and other Breadstuffs.
                   |{ 1,211,000 | Manufactures of Iron and Steel.
                   |{   900,000 | Fish.
                   |{   745,000 | Ginseng.
San Francisco, Cal.|{   700,000 | Cotton Manufactures.
                   |{   650,000 | Wood, and Manufactures of.
                   |{   430,000 | Fruit.
                   |{   375,000 | Gunpowder, etc.
                   |{   358,000 | Medicines, etc.
                   |            |
                   |{ 3,339,153 | Wheat.
Willamette, Oregon |{   704,000 | Flour and Breadstuffs.
                   |{    37,000 | Wood, and Manufactures of.
                   |            |
Wilmington, Cal.   |{   211,928 | Wheat.
                   |{    33,600 | Honey.
-------------------+------------+-------------------------------------
*/



21 Tables 121-07A                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** Simple table with small-caps. We format tables for Plain Text, in which small-caps  ]
[*** are shown as unmarked all upper-case. So, when aligning data in columns, do so      ]
[*** without the small-caps markups, and add them afterwards. Italics and boldface are   ]
[*** done differently and require extra planning, as later examples will show.           ]
[*** Horizontal lines are represented with dashes (minus signs), NOT with underscores.   ]
[*** Vertical lines are represented with, well, the vertical line character: |           ]
[*** And, when lines meet or cross, we use a plus sign.  That includes the corners, if   ]
[*** there were side borders as well as top/bottom borders in the original Image.        ]


The Twelfth Annual Scottish National Archery Meeting
was held on the County Cricket-ground in Raeburn Place,
Stockbridge, Edinburgh, on August 17 and 18, 1866.

/*
+-----------------+----------+----------+----------+-----------+
|                 |100 Yards | 80 Yards | 60 Yards |  <sc>Totals</sc>   |
|   <sc>Gentlemen</sc>     +----+-----+----+-----+----+-----+-----------+
|                 |Hits|Score|Hits|Score|Hits|Score|Hits |Score|
+-----------------+----+-----+----+-----+----+-----+-----+-----+
| Mr. P. Muir     | 67 | 279 | 63 | 261 | 42 | 212 | 172 | 752 |
| Captain Betham  | 47 | 195 | 56 | 232 | 42 | 196 | 145 | 623 |
+-----------------+----+-----+----+-----+----+-----+-----+-----+
*/



21 Tables 121-07B                 Updated  2013/05/27

[*** This is how the in-line markups in the previous example will look in _Plain Text_.]


The Twelfth Annual Scottish National Archery Meeting
was held on the County Cricket-ground in Raeburn Place,
Stockbridge, Edinburgh, on August 17 and 18, 1866.

/*
+-----------------+----------+----------+----------+-----------+
|                 |100 Yards | 80 Yards | 60 Yards |  TOTALS   |
|   GENTLEMEN     +----+-----+----+-----+----+-----+-----+-----+
|                 |Hits|Score|Hits|Score|Hits|Score|Hits |Score|
+-----------------+----+-----+----+-----+----+-----+-----+-----+
| Mr. P. Muir     | 67 | 279 | 63 | 261 | 42 | 212 | 172 | 752 |
| Captain Betham  | 47 | 195 | 56 | 232 | 42 | 196 | 145 | 623 |
+-----------------+----+-----+----+-----+----+-----+-----+-----+
*/



21 Tables 121-08A                 Updated  2011/07/29


SIMPLE RAW GLAZES. COLOURLESS

[*** Small-caps in Plain Text become All-Caps, so align such text without any markups, then add the markups at the very end.]
[*** Italics in tables often requires special handling, but the one italics here is OK as-is.]
[*** The next example shows how this aligns in _Plain Text_.]
/*
=============================================================================
<sc>No.</sc>     | <sc>Materials</sc>        | <sc>Parts</sc> | <sc>Sieve No.</sc> | <sc>Cone</sc> | <sc>Method of Using</sc>
--------+------------------+-------+-----------+------+----------------------
I       | Lead oxide, red  |  50   | 100. Mesh | .03  | Applied evenly
Glossy  | China stone      |  30   |           |      | with a brush to
        | Flint            |  10   |           |      | the <i>green</i>
        |                  |       |           |      | shapes. Fired very
        |                  |       |           |      | slowly. Earthenware
        |                  |       |           |      | body.
        |                  |       |           |      |
II      | Borax            |  70   |  80. Mesh |  2   | Green shapes[*** "80. Mesh" isn't bold, just too much ink.]
Glossy  | China clay       |  10   |           |      | dipped thick[*** If in doubt, leave a note right next to it.]
        | Felspar          |  75   |           |      | and slowly fired.
        | Flint            |  20   |           |      | Stoneware body.
        | Whiting          |  25   |           |      |
        |                  |       |           |      |
III     | Borax            | 360   | 100. Mesh | .03  | Ground dry for
Glossy  | Silver sand      | 160   |           |      | 1/2 hour Wet for
        | China clay       | 120   |           |      | 1-1/2 Used when
        | Whiting          |  20   |           |      | fresh on biscuit
        | Flint            |  10   |           |      | (earthenware
        |                  |       |           |      | body) for underglaze
        |                  |       |           |      | painting.
--------+------------------+-------+-----------+------+----------------------
*/



21 Tables 121-08B                 Updated  2011/07/29


SIMPLE RAW GLAZES. COLOURLESS

[*** This is how the in-line tags of the previous example will look in Plain Text.]
/*
=============================================================================
NO.     | MATERIALS        | PARTS | SIEVE NO. | CONE | METHOD OF USING
--------+------------------+-------+-----------+------+----------------------
I       | Lead oxide, red  |  50   | 100. Mesh | .03  | Applied evenly
Glossy  | China stone      |  30   |           |      | with a brush to
        | Flint            |  10   |           |      | the _green_
        |                  |       |           |      | shapes. Fired very
        |                  |       |           |      | slowly. Earthenware
        |                  |       |           |      | body.
        |                  |       |           |      |
II      | Borax            |  70   |  80. Mesh |  2   | Green shapes
Glossy  | China clay       |  10   |           |      | dipped thick
        | Felspar          |  75   |           |      | and slowly fired.
        | Flint            |  20   |           |      | Stoneware body.
        | Whiting          |  25   |           |      |
        |                  |       |           |      |
III     | Borax            | 360   | 100. Mesh | .03  | Ground dry for
Glossy  | Silver sand      | 160   |           |      | 1/2 hour Wet for
        | China clay       | 120   |           |      | 1-1/2 Used when
        | Whiting          |  20   |           |      | fresh on biscuit
        | Flint            |  10   |           |      | (earthenware
        |                  |       |           |      | body) for underglaze
        |                  |       |           |      | painting.
--------+------------------+-------+-----------+------+----------------------
*/



21 Tables 121-09A                 Updated  2019/06/27

[*** Since the eBook has no pages, this part of the table will be appended to ]
[*** the part on the preceding page (not in these examples), so this heading  ]
[*** probably is unnecessary.]
<sc>Table Showing Changes in Period, etc.</sc>--<i>continued.</i>

[*** Putting the heading of the 3rd column on two lines made it possible to   ]
[*** bring the table width down to 75 characters. We are allowed considerable ]
[*** leeway when formatting tables, but it often will not be possible to      ]
[*** make them as narrow as the Guidelines would like. Just do your best.     ]
[*** This table contains small-caps and italics, so some extra planning is    ]
[*** necessary: in Plain Text, small-caps become all-caps, so just align such ]
[*** text as ordinary text and add the markups after the table is finished.   ]
[*** In Plain Text, italics will be indicated by _underscores_, so most of us ]
[*** select 2 symbols that don't appear on the page, and use them as          ]
[*** placeholders: one where each opening italics markup will go, and the     ]
[*** other where each closing italics markup will go. (We do the same for     ]
[*** boldface by substituting 2 other unused symbols.)  After aligning the    ]
[*** data in the columns and finishing the table, we change all of the        ]
[*** "opening" symbols to opening italics markups, and change all of the      ]
[*** "closing" symbols to closing italics markups.  The resulting table will  ]
[*** no longer look aligned, but the Post-Processors will make it look pretty ]
[*** There are other considerations, but that's more than enough for now.     ]
/*
+------------------+----------+--------------------+----------------------+
|                  |  Period. |    Premium and     |   Wages (per week)   |
|                  |          |     Indentures.    |        during        |
|                  |          |                    |    Apprenticeship    |
|                  |          |                    |                      |
+------------------+----------+--------------------+----------------------+
|                  |          |                    |                      |
|5. <sc>Printer's.</sc>     |          |                    |                      |
|                  |          |                    |                      |
|25 years ago      | 3 years  | No premium;        |18 months 2<i>s.</i>,      |
|                  |          |      no indentures |  18 months half pay. |
|                  |          |                    |                      |
|At present time   | 1-1/2 "  |  "         "       |1 month no pay,       |
|                  |          |                    |  5 month 2<i>s.</i>,      |
|                  |          |                    |  12 months half pay. |
|                  |          |                    |                      |
|6. <sc>Stationer's.</sc>   |          |                    |                      |
|                  |          |                    |                      |
|40 years ago      | 2 "      |  "         "       |12 months half        |
|                  |          |                    |  pay, 12 months      |
|                  |          |                    |  three-quarter       |
|                  |          |                    |  pay.                |
|                  |          |                    |                      |
|At present time   |  1-1/2 " |  "         "       |12 months half        |
|                  |          |                    |  pay, 6 months       |
|                  |          |                    |  three-quarter       |
|                  |          |                    |  pay.                |
*/



21 Tables 121-09B                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** This is how the in-line tags of the previous example will look in Plain Text.]

TABLE SHOWING CHANGES IN PERIOD, ETC.--_continued._

/*
+------------------+----------+--------------------+----------------------+
|                  |  Period. |    Premium and     |   Wages (per week)   |
|                  |          |     Indentures.    |        during        |
|                  |          |                    |    Apprenticeship    |
|                  |          |                    |                      |
+------------------+----------+--------------------+----------------------+
|                  |          |                    |                      |
|5. PRINTER'S.     |          |                    |                      |
|                  |          |                    |                      |
|25 years ago      | 3 years  | No premium;        |18 months 2_s._,      |
|                  |          |      no indentures |  18 months half pay. |
|At present time   | 1-1/2 "  |  "         "       |1 month no pay,       |
|                  |          |                    |  5 month 2_s._,      |
|                  |          |                    |  12 months half pay. |
|                  |          |                    |                      |
|6. STATIONER'S.   |          |                    |                      |
|                  |          |                    |                      |
|40 years ago      | 2 "      |  "         "       |12 months half        |
|                  |          |                    |  pay, 12 months      |
|                  |          |                    |  three-quarter       |
|                  |          |                    |  pay.                |
|                  |          |                    |                      |
|At present time   |  1-1/2 " |  "         "       |12 months half        |
|                  |          |                    |  pay, 6 months       |
|                  |          |                    |  three-quarter       |
|                  |          |                    |  pay.                |
*/



21 Tables 121-10A                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** The vertical text had to be moved to make this readable.  We  ]
[*** always rotate vertical text so that it is horizontal, because ]
[*** "text-to-speech" programs cannot decipher vertical text.      ]

/*
EARLY ENGLISH <sc>BEFORE</sc> 1280
--------------------------------------------------------------
<sc>Plantagenet</sc> {  Edward I. 1272           1280-1380 DECORATED
            {  Edward II. 1307
            {  Edward III. 1327
            {      (Crécy, 1346)
            {      (Poitiers, 1356)
------------{-------------------------------------------------
            {  Richard II. 1377         1380-1500 PERPENDICULAR

<sc>Lancaster</sc>   {  Henry IV. 1399
            {  Henry V. 1413
            {      (Agincourt, 1415)
            {  Henry VI. 1422

<sc>York</sc>        {  Edward IV. 1461
            {  Edward V. 1483
            {  Richard III. 1483

<sc>Tudor</sc>       {  Henry VII. 1485
------------{-------------------------------------------------
            {  Henry VIII. 1509
            {  Edward VI. 1547
            {  Mary, 1553
            {  Elizabeth, 1558
                                        1500-1550 RENAISSANCE
<sc>Stuart</sc>      {  James I. 1603
*/



21 Tables 121-11A                 Updated  2013/10/05

body, slightly deeper than ventral fin; posterior three fourths of tail spotted;
rest of tail and body gray-brown or transparent; hindlimbs flecked or spotted
with brown (Table 3, Fig. 2A and 3A).


[*** The heading is wrappable and goes OUTSIDE the no-wrap tags.  Preceding it with two]
[*** blank lines makes it clear that it goes with the table and not the regular text.]
<sc>Table 3.</sc>--Sizes of Tadpoles of <i>Hyla boulengeri</i> in Relation to Developmental
Stages. (Means in parentheses below observed ranges; measurements in mm.)

/*
======================================================
Stage   | N | Body length | Tail length | Total length
--------+---+-------------+-------------+-------------
30      | 1 |     11.0    |     22.2    |     33.2
35      | 1 |     11.0    |     12.0    |     23.0
36      | 3 |   9.5-12.0  |  20.0-21.5  |  31.0-32.0
        |   |    (11.2)   |    (20.5)   |    (31.7)
38      | 2 |     11.5    |     22.0    |     33.5
42      | 2 |  10.5-13.0  |  21.0-22.0  |  32.5-34.0
        |   |    (11.8)   |    (21.5)   |    (33.3)
44      | 2 |  14.0-15.0  |   8.0-15.0  |  22.0-30.0
        |   |    (14.5)   |    (12.5)   |    (26.0)
46      | 1 |     15.0    |             |     15.0 
--------+---+-------------+-------------+-------------
*/

A recently metamorphosed young has a snout-vent length of 15 mm.; the
head is as long as wide, the eyes are prominent; the limbs are weakly barred;
the skin is rugose above and granular below. The venter is immaculate; the



21 Tables 121-12A                 Updated  2011/04/18

These alterations to section 51 were embodied in the proposed law
Constitution Alteration (Legislative Powers), 1910, and submitted to the
electors on 26th April, 1911. The following statement shows the result of
the referendum:--

/*
------------+--------------------------------------------+----------+-----------
            |              Votes Recorded                |          |Percentage
            +-------+-------+--------+---------+---------+          | of total
            |       |       |        | Ballot  |         |          | Electors
            |       |       |        | Papers  |         |          | to whom
   State    |  For  |Against|Informal| issued, |  Total  | Majority |  Ballot
            |       |       |        |but unac-|         | against  |  Papers
            |       |       |        | counted |         | Proposed |   were
            |       |       |        |   for   |         |Alteration|  issued
------------+-------+-------+--------+---------+---------+----------+-----------
New South   |       |       |        |         |         |          |
  Wales     |135,968|240,605|  7,396 |    219  |  384,188| 104,637  |  44.25
Victoria    |170,288|270,390|  7,554 |    334  |  448,566| 100,102  |  62.01
Queensland  | 69,552| 89,420|  3,002 |    161  |  162,135|  19,868  |  55.34
South       |       |       |        |         |         |          |
  Australia | 50,358| 81,904|  1,374 |    166  |  133,802|  31,546  |  61.94
Western     |       |       |        |         |         |          |
  Australia | 33,043| 27,185|    870 |    384  |   61,482|[A]5,858  |  44.33
Tasmania    | 24,147| 33,200|    673 |     33  |   58,053|   9,053  |  56.73
            |-------+-------+--------+---------+---------+----------+-----------
Commonwealth|483,356|742,704| 20,869 |  1,297  |1,248,226| 259,348  |  53.31
------------+-------+-------+--------+---------+---------+----------+-----------

[Footnote A: Majority in favour of alteration.][*** Keep footnote with its table, inside the no-wrap, not at bottom of page.]
*/

Except in the case of Western Australia, this proposal was rejected
in each State; consequently it was rejected in the Commonwealth as a
whole.



21 Tables 121-13A                 Updated  2011/08/05

[*** Genealogy charts need the same formatting skills as tables.  Often, it isn't possible to    ]
[*** fit them within the recommended maximum width (about 75 characters), but the person who     ]
[*** formatted this one found a way to do it with this two-page chart, as shown in the next four ]
[*** examples. The Image of the first page is above, and the formatted result appears next.      ]
[*** (These examples were slightly modified to fit a readable copy onto the computer screen.)    ]
[***                                                                                             ]
[*** Comment: If you encounter a table, chart, or ANY page you just don't want to do, simply     ]
[*** return it to the Round. That's perfectly OK, and there will be someone else who really      ]
[*** enjoys doing that kind of page.                                                             ]



21 Tables 121-13B                 Updated  2011/08/05

[*** See previous example and next two examples.]


HATHORNE FAMILY OF SALEM, MASSACHUSETTS

/*
                                 Hathorne =
                                          |
   +----------+--------------------+------+------------+
   |          |                    |                   |
Robert     William,    = Anne  Elizabeth = Capt.      John       = Sarah
Hathorne   came in the |          (?)      Richard    Hathorne   |
writes     Arbella,    |                   Davenport  of Salem   |
to his     with John   |                   killed by  and Lynn,  |
brother,   Winthrop    |                   lightning  died in    |
William,   1630; first |                   15 July,   Lynn 12    |
from Bray  of Dorches- |                   1665.      Dec. 1676. |
(Berks),   ter; after- |                              Will sworn |
1 April,   wards of    |                              to 25-1-   |
1653.      Salem;      |                              1677.      |
           deputy,     |                                         |
           speaker of  |                                         |
           the House,  |                                         |
           Assistant,  |                                         |
  Major commanding in  | [*** These 5 lines were modified   ]    |
  Indian Wars; ob.     | [*** to fit the example to the     ]    |
  1681 in 74th year of | [*** computer screen. The original ]    |
  his age. Will proved | [*** formatting had more, narrower ]    |
  28 June, 1681.       | [*** lines like the ones above.    ]    |
                       |                                         |
 +---------------------+                                         |
 |                                                               |
 |   +-------+---------+-------+--------+-----------+-------+----+----+
 |   |       |         |       |        |           |       |         |
 | Sarah   John    Priscil- William  Mary b.    Ebenezer Phebe b.  Nathaniel
 | bapt.   bapt.   la bapt. b. in    in Lynn    b. in    in Lynn   named in
 | at      at      at Salem Lynn     ----       Lynn     22 March, his
 | Salem   Salem   22 July, ----     July 1653; ----     1665.     father's
 | 2 June, 18 Oct. 1649; m. Nov.     d. 31 Dec. March,             will.
 | 1644.   1646.   15 Jan.  1651; d. 1676.      1656.
 |                 1669 to  14 Sept.
 |                 Jonathan 1676.
 |                 Shore.
 |
 +-+-----------------+-----+-----+-----+-----+--------+-------------+
   |                 |     |     |     |     |        |             |
 ----  = ----    Sarah born| Nathaniel | Anna born William = Sarah  |
 (dau.)| Helwise 11 March, | b. 11 Aug.| 12 Dec.   b. 1 Apr.        |
       |         1644-5; m.| 1639.     | 1643; m.  1645; d.         |
    Gervice      13 April, |           | 27 Jan.   14 July,         |
    Helwise      1665, to  |           | 1664-5 to 1676.            |
    in "Urop"    Joseph    |           | Joseph    Captain.         |
    according    Coker of  |           | Porter.                    |
    to his gr.   Newbury,  |           |                            |
    father's     and died  |           |                            |
    will.        3 Feb'y,  |           |                            |
                 1688.     |           |                            |
                        Eleazer    John b. 4  = Ruth dau.      Elizabeth
                        b. 1 Aug.  Aug. 1641  | of Lieut.      b. 22 July,
                        1637; m.   represen-  | George         1649; m.
                        28-6-1663, tative;    | Gardner;       20-9-1672
                        Abigail,   Assistant; | married        to Israel
                        dau. of    Judge in   | 22-1-1674-5.   Porter.
                        Capt.      Witchcraft |
                        George     cases;     |
                        Curwen, of Judge Sup. |
                        Salem.     Court      |
                                   1702-15;   |
                                   Colonel;   |
                                   died 10    |
                                   May, 1717; |
                                   will       |
                                   proved 27  |
                                   June,      |
                                   1717.      |
                                              |
*/



21 Tables 121-13C                 Updated  2011/08/05

[*** This is the second half of the Genealogy chart that began earlier.  The next example shows ]
[*** the formatting, the previous two examples show the first half.]



21 Tables 121-13D                 Updated  2011/08/05

[*** This is the 4th part of the Genealogy Chart example]

/*
  +-------+--------------+---------+-----------------+---------------+
  |       |              |         |                 |               |
John  Nathaniel  =   Ebenezer   Joseph  = Sarah    Ruth, = James  Benjamin
10    b. 25 Nov. |   bapt. Mch. bapt.   | dau. of  bapt.   Pitman (named
Jan'y 1678.      |   1685.      June,   | Capt. W. Sept.          in his
1675.            |              1691.   | Bowditch 1694.          father's
        +--------+              Will    | b. 10                   will).
      John mentioned            proved  | Jan'y,
      in his gr.                15 July,| 1695-6.
      father's will.            1762.   |
                                        |
  +--------------+---+----------------+-+---------+---+-------------+
  |              |   |                |           |   |             |
William = Mary   | John   = Susanna Sarah = Daniel|Daniel, = Rachel |
born 20   dau. of| bapt.  | Touzell bapt.   Chever|a ma-   | Phelps |
Feb'y,    John   | 22 May,| will    27 Jan.       |riner;  |        |
1715-     Touzell| 1719,  | pro.    1722.         |adm. gr.|        |
1716.     m. 29  | d. 6   | 7 Sept.               |to wid. |        |
          March, | Feb'y, | 1802.                 |4 May,  |        |
          1741.  | 1750.  |                       |1796.   |        |
                 |        |                       |        |        |
              Joseph      |                    Ebenezer    |     Ruth = David
              bapt.       |                    bapt. 26    |            Ropes
              4th         |                    Dec.        |            m. 30
              May,        +--John   } ment.    1725.       |            Sept.
              1718.       |         } in will              |            1752.
                          +--Susanna} of gr.               |
                                    } father.              |
                                                           |
       +----+---+-------+-----+-------+-------------------++--+
       |    |   |       |     |       |                   |   |
     Daniel | Eunice  Daniel  |   Nathaniel, = Elizabeth  | Rachel = Simon
     b. 23  | b. 4    b. 25   |   Sea Cap-   | Clarke     |          Forres-
     June,  | Oct.    July,   |   tain; b. 19| Manning b. |          ter.
     1759;  | 1766.   1768.   |   May, 1775; | 6 Sept.    |   [*** Moved a]
     d. 13  | Ob. s.          |   adm. gr. to| 1780; died |   [*** Note to]
     Mar.   | p.              |   his wid. 19| 31 July,   |   [*** bottom.]
     1763.  |                 |   Apr. 1808; | 1849.      |
            |                 |   died in    |            |
            |                 |   Surinam.   |            |
            |                 |              |            |
          Sarah = John      Judith = George  |         Ruth b.
          b. 11   Crownin-  b. 17    Archer  |         20 Jan.
          May     shield.   Apr.     m. 2    |         1778; d.
          1763.             1770.    March,  |         26 July,
                                     1792.   |         1847.
                                             |
       +-----------------+-------------------+--+------------------+
       |                 |                      |                  |
Elizabeth Manning   NATHANIEL           = Sophia, dau. of Doc.  Maria Louisa
born 7 March,       b. 4 July, 1804; d.   Nathl. Peabody, of    b. 9 Jan'y,
1802;               at Plymouth, N. H.    Salem; b. 21 Sept.    1808; lost in
died 1 Jan'y,       19 May, 1864.         1809; mar. in         the steamer
1883.               Buried at Concord,    Boston, July,         Henry Clay,
                    Mass. 23 May, 1864.   1842.                 burned on the
                    He changed his                              Hudson River
                    surname to                                  27 July, 1852.
                    Hawthorne.
[**F1: not sure what the vertical line and horizontal } mean; left them out]
[**    as there don't appear to be any children]
*/



21 Tables 121-15A                 Updated  2012/04/12

/*
|                      |          |               |         |             |
|Engagement during     |November, |British, Ward's|  3,000  |5 killed,    |
|Ti-ping attempt to    |1862      |force, and     |         |15 wounded.  |
|recapture Kah-ding.   |          |Imperialists   |         |             |
|                      |          |               |         |             |
|During the repulse of |14th      |Anglo-Manchoo  |  1,000  |2,500 killed |
|the attack on Tait-san|February, |Contingent     |         |& wounded.   |
|                      |1863      |and Imperial   |         |             |
|                      |          |troops.        |         |             |
|                      |          |               |         |             |
|Capture of Fu-shan    |6th April,|Filibuster     |  1,200  |2 killed,    |
|village, and relief of|1863      |<i>General</i>      |         |3 wounded.   |
|Chang-zu              |          |Gordon's force.|         |             |
|                      |          |               |         |             |
|Capture of the city of|2nd May,  |British,       |  2,000  |200 <i>hors de |
|Tait-san              |1863      |Gordon's       |         |combat</i>.     |
|                      |          |and Imperial   |         |             |
|                      |          |forces.        |         |             |
|                      |          |               |         |             |
|Massacre of Ti-pings  |30th May, |The            |  3,000  |Gordon's     |
|during their          |1863      |Anglo-Manchoo  |         |force,       |
|evacuation  of the    |          |disciplined and|         |2 killed and |
|city of Quin-san.     |          |foreign-       |         |5 drowned;   |
|                      |          |officered      |         |Imperialist  |
|                      |          |Contingent, and|         |loss, about  |
|                      |          |an Imperialist |         |300.         |
|                      |          |army.          |         |             |
*/
[*** Each cell of a table is formatted separately, so the italicized "hors de combat"   ]
[*** should be marked as shown: a single phrase, with one pair of tags; and not as two  ]
[*** italicized phrases, even though it's on two lines. This applies even when the text ]
[*** is on more than one line of a "cell" in the original image. The text also should be]
[*** aligned based on how it will look in Plain Text (see next example).                ]



21 Tables 121-15B                 Updated  2014/07/11

/*
|                      |          |               |         |             |
|Engagement during     |November, |British, Ward's|  3,000  |5 killed,    |
|Ti-ping attempt to    |1862      |force, and     |         |15 wounded.  |
|recapture Kah-ding.   |          |Imperialists   |         |             |
|                      |          |               |         |             |
|During the repulse of |14th      |Anglo-Manchoo  |  1,000  |2,500 killed |
|the attack on Tait-san|February, |Contingent     |         |& wounded.   |
|                      |1863      |and Imperial   |         |             |
|                      |          |troops.        |         |             |
|                      |          |               |         |             |
|Capture of Fu-shan    |6th April,|Filibuster     |  1,200  |2 killed,    |
|village, and relief of|1863      |_General_      |         |3 wounded.   |
|Chang-zu              |          |Gordon's force.|         |             |
|                      |          |               |         |             |
|Capture of the city of|2nd May,  |British,       |  2,000  |200 _hors de |
|Tait-san              |1863      |Gordon's       |         |combat_.     |
|                      |          |and Imperial   |         |             |
|                      |          |forces.        |         |             |
|                      |          |               |         |             |
|Massacre of Ti-pings  |30th May, |The            |  3,000  |Gordon's     |
|during their          |1863      |Anglo-Manchoo  |         |force,       |
|evacuation  of the    |          |disciplined and|         |2 killed and |
|city of Quin-san.     |          |foreign-       |         |5 drowned;   |
|                      |          |officered      |         |Imperialist  |
|                      |          |Contingent, and|         |loss, about  |
|                      |          |an Imperialist |         |300.         |
|                      |          |army.          |         |             |
*/
[*** This is how the previous example will look in Plain Text: the columns are aligned ]
[*** and "hors de combat" is properly italicized across two lines in its cell.         ]



21 Tables 121-16A                 Updated  2016/05/09

/#[*** paragraph is indented and wrappable, so it's a Block Quote]
in addition to the works of the better-known writers, such as
Bolingbroke and Hume, after the period commonly marked as
that of the "decline of deism." In the list may be included a
few by Unitarians, who at this stage were doing critical work.
Like a number of the earlier works above mentioned, the following
(save Evanson) are overlooked in Sir Leslie Stephen's survey:--

/*[*** This is a two-column table. It can't be formatted as a simple list, because some of the entries are multi-line with ]
  [*** hanging indents, and the ditto marks must be associated with the dates. The mdash above it, and the extra space     ]
  [*** below it, confirm that it's part of the Block Quote. This example also appears in the "Lists" category.             ]
1746.  <i>Essay on Natural Religion.</i> Falsely attributed to Dryden.

  "    <i>Deism fairly stated and fully vindicated</i>, etc. Anon.

1750.  John Dove, <i>A Creed founded on Truth and Common Sense</i>.

  "    <i>The British Oracle.</i> (Two numbers only.)

1752.  <i>The Pillars of Priestcraft and Orthodoxy Shaken.</i> Four vols. of freethinking
         pamphlets, collected (and some written) by Thomas Gordon,
         formerly secretary to Trenchard. Edited by R. Barron. (Rep. 1768.)

1772.  E. Evanson, <i>The Doctrines of a Trinity and the Incarnation</i>, etc.

1773.  ---- <i>Three Discourses</i> (1. Upon the Man after God's own Heart; 2. Upon
         the Faith of Abraham; 3. Upon the Seal of the Foundation of God).
*/
#/

Of the work here noted a considerable amount was done by[*** paragraph is not indented, so Block Quote ended above]
Unitarians, Evanson being of that persuasion, though at the time



21 Tables 121-17A                 Updated  2019/03/26

PRINCIPAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MORE IMPORTANT BACILLI

/*
-----------------+---------------------------------------------+---------------+----------------+------------------
                 |       <sc>Characteristics of the Cultures.</sc>      |   <sc>Influence   |                |
      <sc>Name.</sc>      +----------------+---------------+------------+       of      |  <sc>Physiological |      <sc>Sundry
                 |     Slides.    |    Gelatin.   |   Gelose.  |   Oxygen and  |      Action.</sc>   |   Observations.</sc>
                 |                |               |            |      Heat.</sc>    |                |
-----------------+----------------+---------------+------------+---------------+----------------+------------------
B. Caucasius.    |                |               |            |Aërobic.       |                |Dissolves
                 |                |               |            |               |                |  precipitated
                 |                |               |            |               |                |  caseine.
-----------------+----------------+---------------+------------+---------------+----------------+------------------
                 |  Colonies of   |               |            |               |                |Produces propionic
                 |    whitish     |  The gelatin  |            |               |                |  acid at
B Cavicida.      |   concentric   |    becomes    |            |Aërobic.       |Pathogenic.     |  the expense
                 | rings, like a  |    viscid.    |            |               |                |  of sugars.
                 |tortoise shell. |               |            |               |                |
-----------------+----------------+---------------+------------+---------------+----------------+------------------
B. Claviformis   |                |               |            |Anaërobic.     |Albuminoid      |Spores form at
 (<i>Tyrothrix     |                |               |            |               |  ferment.      |  an enlarged
   claviformis</i>).|                |               |            |               |                |  extremity.
*/
[*** Formatting tables containing multi-line Small-Caps and italics (boldface would be done the same way as italics): we apply tags by cell, ]
[*** not by line, so the entire italics phrase in a cell should be enclosed in one pair of italics tags, even if it is several lines long.   ]
[*** We are formatting for Plain Text, where italics tags become underscores _like this_, so we must allow for an extra character on each of ]
[*** the first and last lines when aligning the columns. If the italics is on just one line, the width of the cell must allow for those two  ]
[*** extra characters on that line. See the last cell in the left-hand column, above, for an example of two-line italics.                    ]
[***                                                                                                                                         ]
[*** One way to do this is to add _placeholders_ for italics tags (and boldface, if any; but NOT for Small-Caps) before doing anything else, ]
[*** then align the table BEFORE adding real tags. When the table is properly aligned, replace the italics placeholders with opening/closing ]
[*** tags, and add opening/closing Small-Caps tags at the beginning and end of each phrase needing them. If the table contains notes from    ]
[*** earlier proofreaders, temporarily move them to the ends of their lines (out of the way), then move them back when done formatting.      ]
[***                                                                                                                                         ]
[*** Small-Caps will become ALL-CAPS in the Plain Text version of the eBook, and their tags will be discarded. As with italics, the entire   ]
[*** Small-Caps phrase in a cell should be enclosed in one pair of Small-Caps tags, as shown in the headings above.                          ]
{***                                                                                                                                         ]
[*** NOTES: The Format Previewer may flag cells formatted this way as errors, even when they are done correctly.                             ]
[***        The Big Eye may display lines containing cells formatted this way incorrectly, as there may be two "opening" tags in a row.      ]
[***        Don't forget to enclose the table in no-wraps, and to leave appropriate blank lines where needed.                                ]
[***        The next example shows how the Plain Text version of this table will look after being post-processed.                            ]



21 Tables 121-17B                 Updated  2019/03/25

PRINCIPAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MORE IMPORTANT BACILLI

/*
-----------------+---------------------------------------------+---------------+----------------+------------------
                 |       CHARACTERISTICS OF THE CULTURES.      |   INFLUENCE   |                |
      NAME.      +----------------+---------------+------------+       OF      |  PHYSIOLOGICAL |      SUNDRY
                 |     Slides.    |    Gelatin.   |   Gelose.  |   OXYGEN AND  |      ACTION.   |   OBSERVATIONS.
                 |                |               |            |      HEAT.    |                |
-----------------+----------------+---------------+------------+---------------+----------------+------------------
B. Caucasius.    |                |               |            |Aërobic.       |                |Dissolves
                 |                |               |            |               |                |  precipitated
                 |                |               |            |               |                |  caseine.
-----------------+----------------+---------------+------------+---------------+----------------+------------------
                 |  Colonies of   |               |            |               |                |Produces propionic
                 |    whitish     |  The gelatin  |            |               |                |  acid at
B Cavicida.      |   concentric   |    becomes    |            |Aërobic.       |Pathogenic.     |  the expense
                 | rings, like a  |    viscid.    |            |               |                |  of sugars.
                 |tortoise shell. |               |            |               |                |
-----------------+----------------+---------------+------------+---------------+----------------+------------------
B. Claviformis   |                |               |            |Anaërobic.     |Albuminoid      |Spores form at
 (_Tyrothrix     |                |               |            |               |  ferment.      |  an enlarged
   claviformis_).|                |               |            |               |                |  extremity.
*/
[*** This is how the Plain Text version of the table in the previous example will look after being post-processed. ]



21 Tables 121-18A                 Updated  2019/10/13


<i>CRIME UNDER PROHIBITION IN THIRTY AMERICAN
CITIES</i>

/*
                                                   <i>Drunkenness and
                                    <i>Arrests          Disorderly
                  <i>Population</i>     All Causes</i>         Conduct</i>
                     <i>1920</i>     <i>1920</i>    <i>1921</i>    <i>1920</i>   <i>1921</i>
Philadelphia       1,823,779    73,015    83,136    20,443   27,115
Detroit              995,678    43,309    50,676     5,989    6,349
Boston               748,060    58,817    72,161    22,341   31,794
*/
[*** This table's headings are in italics, and two of them are multi-line. Those two also span two columns,  ]
[*** but each is a single heading that should be formatted as a unit. The explanation given in the previous  ]
[*** example applies here: the first line of each multi-line heading should begin with an opening italics    ]
[*** tag, and the last line of each multi-line heading should end with a closing italics tag.                ]
[***                                                                                                         ]
[*** Consider the last column: "Drunkenness" should be preceded by an opening italics tag and "Conduct"      ]
[*** should be followed by a closing italics tag. There should be no tag after "and" on the first line, no   ]
[*** tags at all around "Disorderly", and no tag before "Conduct".                                           ]
[***                                                                                                         ]
[*** Each date is the heading for just one column, so each one should be enclosed in its own italics tags.   ]
[***                                                                                                         ]
[*** Since the italics tags will become one-character underscores in the Plain Text version of the eBook, a  ]
[*** way to make it easier to obtain proper alignment is to use placeholders such as @ and _ e.g., "@1920_", ]
[*** do the alignments, and then replace the @ with an opening italics tag and the _ with a closing italics  ]
[*** tag. You can use whatever placeholder characters you like, and if you do the alignment in an external   ]
[*** editor, you can do a global replace when done, then copy and paste the result back into DP's Formatting ]
[*** Interface. (If doing a global replace, make sure the placeholders aren't used in the actual text of the ]
[*** same page.) The Format Previewer may flag some of this as errors, but this is how it should be done.    ]
[***                                                                                                         ]
[*** The next example shows how this will look once it has been post-processed into Plain Text. The HTML and ]
[*** mobile eBook versions will look similar to the Plain Text, but will use actual italics, not underscores.]



21 Tables 121-18B                 Updated  2019/10/14


_CRIME UNDER PROHIBITION IN THIRTY AMERICAN
CITIES_

/*
                                                   _Drunkenness and
                                    _Arrests          Disorderly
                  _Population_     All Causes_         Conduct_
                     _1920_     _1920_    _1921_    _1920_   _1921_
Philadelphia       1,823,779    73,015    83,136    20,443   27,115
Detroit              995,678    43,309    50,676     5,989    6,349
Boston               748,060    58,817    72,161    22,341   31,794
*/
[*** This is how the previous example will look after it has been post-processed into Plain Text. ]
[*** The headings line up and the multi-line headings of the columns are enclosed in just one set ]
[*** of italics tags. When post-processed for HTML and mobile readers, the table will look very   ]
[*** much like this, but the headings will be in actual italics.                                  ]



22 Poetry 122-00A                 Updated  2014/07/09

 
/*
Cold was the night-breeze that sighed round her bower,
It chilled my poor Kathleen, she drooped from that hour:
  And I lost my poor Kathleen, my own little Kathleen,
        My Kathleen O'More.
 
The Bird of all birds that I love the best,
Is the Robin that in the churchyard builds his nest;
  For he seems to watch Kathleen, hops lightly o'er Kathleen,
        My Kathleen O'More.
 
<i>James Nugent Reynolds</i>
*/

[*** "POETRY" is a specialized topic, so only a few,         ]
[*** relatively simple examples are shown. To format poetry: ]
[*** 1. Find lines that were split because the paper was not ]
[***    wide enough, and rejoin them. This is unlike most of ]
[***    our proofing and formatting, where we preserve the   ]
[***    original line breaks.                                ]
[*** 2. Reproduce any indentation, always using an EVEN      ]
[***    number of spaces. However....                        ]
[*** 3. Ignore a stanza's leading quotation mark when        ]
[***    indenting its other lines. (Don't indent them by an  ]
[***    extra space.)                                        ]
[*** 4. enclose all of the verses of one poem in one set of  ]
[***    no-wraps, to preserve the line breaks and your       ]
[***    indentation.  However....                            ]
[*** 5. The titles of poems go OUTSIDE any no-wrap, and so   ]
[***    do section numbers, if there are any.                ]
[*** 6. If there is an Attribution, (as in the example       ]
[***    above), some Post-Processors (strongly) prefer it to ]
[***    be in the same no-wrap as the poem, while others     ]
[***    (strongly) prefer it to be in a separate no-wrap.    ]
[***    So, if this preference is not to be found in the     ]
[***    Project Comments or Discussion ... ASK (but by now,  ]
[***    you already know that).                              ]
[*** 7. Depending on the Project Comments, treat each new    ]
[***    poem as a Chapter (4/2 spacing) or a Section (2/1    ]
[***    spacing). Of course, if the poem is just between     ]
[***    paragraphs of prose, the no-wrap tags and their      ]
[***    blank lines will provide the necessary separation.   ]



22 Poetry 122-01A                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** Line 6 is indented; the others had been   ]
[*** wrapped because they were too long to fit.]
/*
To an old empty woodman's house that's hidden
Close to a clump of beech trees in the wood
Westward of Tara, there to await a friend
That could, as he had told her, work his cure
And would be no harsh friend.
          When night had deepened,
I groped my way through boughs, and over roots,
Till oak and hazel ceased and beech began,
And found the house, a sputtering torch within,
And stretched out sleeping on a pile of skins
Ardan, and though I called to him and tried
To shake him out of sleep, I could not rouse him.
I waited till the night was on the turn,
*/



22 Poetry 122-02A                 Updated  2011/03/07

[*** Match indentation, but always with]
[*** an even number of spaces.]




GETTIN' ON.


/*
When I wuz somewhat younger,
  I wuz reckoned purty gay--
I had my fling at everything
  In a rollickin', coltish way,
But times have strangely altered
  Since sixty years ago--
This age of steam an' things don't seem
  Like the age I used to know,
Your modern innovations
  Don't suit me, I confess,
As did the ways of the good ol' days--
  But I'm gettin' on, I guess.
*/



22 Poetry 122-03A                 Updated  2016/11/30




THE GUEST.


/*
Lights Love, the timorous bird, to dwell,[*** Treat the drop-cap as an ordinary letter; the first ]
  While summer smiles, a guest with you? [*** word should be in ordinary upper-lower case.        ]
Be wise betimes and use him well,        [*** Look at other stanzas of the same poem to determine ]
  And he will stay in winter too:        [*** the indentation of the drop-cap line and any lines  ]
For you can have no sweeter thing        [*** it pushed to the right.                             ]
Within the heart's warm nest to sing.

The blue-plumed swallows fly away,
  Ere autumn gilds a leaf; and then
Have wit to find another day
  The little clay-built house again:
He will not know, a second spring,
His last year's nest, if Love take wing.
*/

/*
<sc>Thomas Ashe.</sc>
*/



22 Poetry 122-03B                 Updated  2016/11/30




WHEN THE LEAVES FALL IN
AUTUMN.

<sc>From the Italian of Lorenzo Stecchetti.</sc>


/*
  When the leaves fall in autumn, and you go[**indentation?][*** Treat the drop-cap as an ordinary ]
To seek the cross that marks my lonely grave,       [*** letter, and the first word as ordinary    ]
In that far corner where they laid me low           [*** upper-lower case. Look at other stanzas   ]
The nodding wild-flowers o'er my bones shall wave.  [*** as a guide to the indentation of lines    ]
                                                    [*** whose indentations were affected by the   ]
  Oh, pluck you then, to deck your golden hair,     [*** drop-cap, and if you don't find a clear   ]
The flowers born of my heart which blossom there:   [*** pattern, leave a note.                    ]

  They are the songs I dreamed, but ne'er have sung,
The words of love you heard not on my tongue.
*/

/*
<sc>G. A. Greene.</sc>
*/



22 Poetry 122-04A                 Updated  2011/04/18

against his name on the speculative division list. The late honorable
Robert Baldwin, in a playful and humoros[** humorous] way interpreted the
feeling of Parliament when in allusion to the subject of our sketch
he once said that

[*** The indentation of the first line probably means it's from the middle of the original line.]
/*
              Whether grave, or mellow,
He was such a genial, testy pleasant fellow;
Had so much sense, and so much wit about him,
There was no living with him or without him.
*/



22 Poetry 122-05A                 Updated  2011/04/18


III
[*** format as a new Section, and leave the Verse]
[*** number OUTSIDE the no-wraps. Note that lines were]
[*** rejoined where paper was not wide enough for them.]

/*
And, as the Cock crew, those who stood before
The Tavern shouted--"Open then the Door!
  You know how little while we have to stay,
And, once departed, may return no more."
*/


IV

/*
Now the New Year reviving old Desires,
The thoughtful Soul to Solitude retires,
  Where the <sc>White Hand of Moses</sc> on the Bough
Puts out, and Jesus from the Ground suspires.
*/



22 Poetry 122-06A                 Updated  2014/07/09

[*** Format poetry in Footnotes the same way as any other poetry.]

[Footnote 1: The Koribantes remind us of the Salii of the Latins, to whom
Numa gives the arms and the words, to be sung leaping. According to
Ovid's distich--

/*
"Jam dederat Salii (a saltu nomina ducunt)
  Armaque et ad certos verba canenda modos."

--<i>Fasti</i>, iii. 389.
*/
]
[*** A blank line is not needed between "closing" markups.                ]
[*** Some Post-Processors prefer attributions to be placed within the     ]
[*** same no-wraps as the verse or quotation, while others prefer them    ]
[*** to be enclosed in a separate pair of no-wraps. If the Project        ]
[*** Comments and Discussion do not state a preference, it's best to ask. ]
[***                                                                      ]
[*** Ignore a stanza's leading quotation mark when indenting its other    ]
[*** lines. (Don't indent them by an extra space.)                        ]



22 Poetry 122-07A                 Updated  2014/04/22

/*
And all men praised Herzeleide, the queen, as both fair and true,
And the queen of three kingdoms was she, of Waleis and fair Anjou,
Of these twain was she aye the ruler; and beside them in far Norgals      705
Did she bear the crown and sceptre, in the city of Kingrivals.
And so dear did she hold her husband, if never a maid might win
So gallant a man, what recked she? She counted it not for sin.

As for half a year he was absent she looked for his coming sure,
For but in the thought of that meeting might the life of the queen endure.      710
*/
[*** Enclose poetry in no-wraps unless the Project Comments say otherwise. Replicate any   ]
[*** indentation. If there are line numbers, keep them and place them at least six spaces  ]
[*** past the right-hand end of the line, even if they are on the left side of the poetry  ]
[*** in the original (as shown in the next example).                                       ]

[*** Note: This example (122-07A) replaces an earlier one, so any Forum discussions before ]
[*** April 22, 2014 do not apply to this replacement.                                      ]



22 Poetry 122-07B                 Updated  2014/04/22

/*
Then brake the sword of her gladness thro' the midst of the hilt in twain,
Ah me! and alas! for her mourning, that goodness should bear such pain
And faith ever waken sorrow! Yea, so doth it run alway
With the life of men, and to-morrow must they mourn who rejoice to-day!

So it chanced that the queen one noontide in a restless slumber lay,      715
'Twas as if with a start she wakened and by lightning was borne away,
And towards the clouds it bare her, and they smote her with mighty force,
The fiery bolts of Heaven, as they sped on their downward course,
And sparks sprang from her floating tresses mid the fire of the circling spheres,
And the thunder crashed loud around her, and the rain-drops were burning tears.      720
*/
[*** This is the top of the next page of the same project as the previous example (122-07A). ]
[*** Here, the line numbers were printed on the left, so we move them to the right-hand end  ]
[*** of the line, leaving at least six spaces before each of them. It is not necessary to    ]
[*** align them, as consistent page-to-page alignment is difficult to achieve in formatting, ]
[*** but easily done during post-processing.                                                 ]
[***                                                                                         ]
[*** The last two lines of this example didn't fit the original book's margins and had to be ]
[*** continued on the next line, but eBooks do not have the same limitations, so we, as      ]
[*** formatters, rejoin those lines. ]



22 Poetry 122-08A                 Updated  2014/07/09




CHAPTER III.

LIFE IN THE OCEAN.

/*
"See what a lovely shell, small and pure as a pearl,
Frail, but a work divine, made so fairly well,
With delicate spore and whorl, a miracle of design."
 
<sc>Tennyson.</sc>
*/
[*** The attribution ("Tennyson") raises two questions: 1) should it be moved to a separate   ]
[*** line, preceded by a blank line, or remain on the same line as the verse, preceded by     ]
[*** six spaces; and 2) if moved to a separate line, should it be enclosed in a separate pair ]
[*** of no-wraps or remain in the same no-wraps as the verse? If the Project Comments and     ]
[*** Discussion do not provide guidance, it's best to ask what is preferred.                  ]
[*** Ignore a stanza's leading quotation mark when indenting its other lines. (Don't indent   ]
[*** them by an extra space.)                                                                 ]
[*** (This example also appears in the "Chapters" category.)                                  ]


"The appearance of the open sea," says Frédol, from whose elegant
work this chapter is chiefly compiled, "far from the shore--the
boundless ocean--is to the man who loves to create a world of his



22 Poetry 122-09A                 Updated  2014/07/09

/*
"Vain as the passing gale, my crying;
  Though lightning-struck, I must live on;
I know, at heart, there is no dying
  Of love and ruined hope alone.

<tb>

"The very wildness of my sorrow
  Tells me I yet have innate force;
My track of life has been too narrow,
  Effort shall trace a broader course."
*/
[*** The Poetry section of the Formatting Guidelines says:                ]
[*** "If a row of dots appears in a poem, treat this as a thought break." ]
[*** Some Project Managers prefer to use an ellipsis, and will express    ]
[*** that preference in the Project Comments.                             ]
[***                                                                      ]
[*** Ignore a stanza's leading quotation mark when indenting its other    ]
[*** lines. (Don't indent them by an extra space.)                        ]



22 Poetry 122-10A                 Updated  2014/02/11

/*[*** THIS IS NOT POETRY ***]
Per omnes gradus militiae navalis eluctatus
Propraetor Patriae
Classes et expeditiones maritimas
Annis XX rexit.
Decies quinque Classibus collatis cum hoste
conflixit,
Raro aequata clade; plerumque Victor ac
Triumphator praeliis rediit.
Restabat magnus tot belli facinoribus
Imponendus dies VIII Nov.
A. CIC IC CLVIII.
In recto Maris Baltici supremum Virtutis
opus edidit.
Ibi primum in praelium ruens,
Praetoriam Suecorum invasit, afflixit,
Dein propraetorianae praegrandes alias,
Eorundem aliquot,
Armis, viris, animis
Instructissimas, sola propraetoria sua, rejecit,
afflixit, submersit;
Donec a sociis undique desertus, ab hostibus
undique circumfusus, discerpto globis
corpore, Bellatricem animam coelo
reddidit.

Corpus
Ipse Rex hostis
generosa fortitudinis hostilis admiratione,
splendide compositum in patriam remisit.
Vixit LIX annos.
Sic redeunt quos honor ac virtus remittunt.
*/
[*** This was a full page. It may be an inscription, and it   ]
[*** certainly isn't poetry, so left-justify every line. (We  ]
[*** do not indicate or preserve centering when formatting.)  ]
[*** Enclose it in no-wraps to preserve the line breaks.      ]
[*** Precede the opening no-wrap with a blank line to         ]
[*** separate it from whatever text was on the previous page. ]



22 Poetry 122-11A                 Updated  2014/02/11

/*[*** THIS IS NOT POETRY ***]
XII. KALENDAS MAII
CAPTA EST ADELHEIDIS IMPERATRIX
CVMIS A BERENGARIO REGE
XIII. KALENDAS SEPTEMBRIS
LIBERAVIT, DOMINVS
ADELHEIDAM REGINAM A VINCVLIS.
*/

La credo fattura de' secoli posteriori;
potrebbe nondimeno essere che contenesse
qualche verità. Che questa regina
[*** Like the previous example, this may be   ]
[*** an inscription, but it isn't poetry. It  ]
[*** may be centered, but we do not replicate ]
[*** centering, so left-justify these lines   ]
[*** and enclose them in no-wrap. Precede the ]
[*** opening no-wrap with a blank line to     ]
[*** separate it from the text just before it ]
[*** (in the other column that is not shown   ]
[*** here).                                   ]



22 Poetry 122-12A                 Updated  2017/03/17


IV. OF THE GOLDEN AGE[*** Section Heading: 2 blank lines]

/*
Recall for me, recall
The time more true and ample;
The world whereon I trample,
How tortuous and small!
Behold, I tire of all.

Once, gods in jeweled mail
Through greenwood ways invited;
There now the moon is blighted,
And mosses long and pale
On lifeless cedars trail.
  
  <i>Child, keep this good unrest:
  But give to thine own story
  Simplicity with glory;
  To greatness dispossessed,
  Dominion of thy breast.</i>
  
  <i>In abstinence, in pride,
  Thou, who from Folly's boldest
  Thy sacred eye withholdest,
  Another morn shalt ride
  At Agamemnon's side.</i>
*/
[*** When consecutive stanzas in a poem are in italics  ]
[*** (or boldface or any other type of in-line format), ]
[*** each one must be tagged separately. This rule also ]
[*** applies to consecutive paragraphs in prose.        ]



23 Drama 123-00A                 Updated  2011/05/01

[*** DRAMA is an advanced topic with special requirements. These examples only show    ]
[*** some common situations. Please see the Guidelines, the Drama MasterClass, and the ]
[*** Forum's Drama discussions for further information.                                ]

[*** ********************************************************************************* ]
[*** * Preferences vary among Project Managers and Post-Processors, so it is essential ]
[*** * to read each Project's Comments and Discussion, and to ask for guidance.        ]
[*** ********************************************************************************* ]

[*** These examples are presented differently from others in this Library, because     ]
[*** full pages often must be shown, but doing that makes this text too small to read. ]
[*** So, a Full Page Image often will be shown first, without its text but with some   ]
[*** comments, and followed by excerpts of the image and text.                         ]
[*** You can magnify the examples by ZOOMING with your Browser ( Ctrl + and Ctrl - ).  ]

[*** We will show examples of three kinds of pages:                                    ]
[*** 1. Dramatis Personæ (Cast of Characters);                                         ]
[*** 2. "Act" and "Scene";                                                             ]
[*** 3. Dialog and Stage Directions.                                                   ]



23 Drama 123-00B                 Updated  2011/04/20




THE PERSONS OF THE DRAMA[*** Major Division: 4/2 spacing.]


/*
[*** This is a list. Enclose in no-wrap, single-space, and unwrap long lines, as shown in the]
[*** Drama MasterClass.]
ÆNEAS, prince of Troy, and leader of the Trojan exiles.
<sc>Achates</sc>, confidential friend of Æneas.
<sc>Ilioneus</sc>, a Trojan noble.
DIDO, the queen of Carthage.[*** all upper-case, not small-caps]
<sc>Anna</sc>, sister of Dido.
<sc>Barce</sc>, nurse of Dido.
<sc>Iopas</sc>, a Carthaginian minstrel.
<sc>Iarbas</sc>, a Moorish prince, suitor for the hand of Dido.
<sc>Juno</sc>, queen of Jupiter and protectress of the Carthaginians, hostile to Troy.
<sc>Venus</sc>, the goddess of love, mother of Æneas, and protectress of the Trojans.
<sc>Cupid</sc>, son of Venus, god of love.
<sc>Mercury</sc>, the messenger of Jupiter.
Maidens, Courtiers, Soldiers, Attendants, Servants, etc., in Dido's train.
Nobles, Sailors, etc., in the band of Æneas.
*/



23 Drama 123-01A                 Updated  2011/07/29




<i>CHARACTERS OF THE PLAY</i>


/*[*** a list. Single-space, in no-wrap.]
ADRIAN LAVROV, <i>the Shepherd of Lonz</i>
PETER VETROVA, <i>an old peasant</i>
CATHERINE, <i>Vetrova's wife</i>
VASIL, <i>grandson of Peter and Catherine</i>
VERA, <i>sister to Vasil</i>
KORELENKO, <i>betrothed to Vera</i>
PRINCESS SOPHIE TRAVINSKI
KALUSHKIN, SIMEON, GREGORI, UGO, <i>peasants of Lonz</i>
ANNA, ULIANA, <i>neighbors to the Vetrovas</i>
GREGORIEF, <i>an ex-prisoner</i>
GALOVKINE, <i>a doctor</i>
MANLIEF, <i>a student</i>
COLONEL ORLOFF, <i>of the Czar's army</i>
IRTENIEFF, ZARKOFF, <i>officers</i>

<i>Soldiers, revolutionists, peasants, &c.</i>
 
[*** This isn't a Scene heading, just background information.]
<sc>Scene</sc>: <i>A peasant home in Russia</i>

<sc>Time</sc>: <i>June, nineteen hundred and five</i>
*/

<sc>Note.</sc>--The song episode in Act II is adapted from "The Green
Book," by Maurus Jokai.                [*** Cropped to fit screen.]



23 Drama 123-02A                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** The top of this page is a  ]
[*** simple Dramatis Personæ,   ]
[*** which we format as a list; ]
[*** unwrapped, single-spaced.  ]
[*** The bottom looks like a    ]
[*** Table of Contents, but     ]
[*** without the page numbers,  ]
[*** and that's how it was      ]
[*** formatted. Note that the   ]
[*** Scene numbers go INSIDE    ]
[*** the small-caps markups,    ]
[*** but the colons, which are  ]
[*** separators, go OUTSIDE.    ]
[*** See next 2 examples for    ]
[*** the actual formatting.     ]



23 Drama 123-02B                 Updated  2011/04/13

[*** This is the top of the page shown in the previous example, formatted as a list.]




CHARACTERS


/*
<sc>James Mayo</sc>, <i>a farmer</i>
<sc>Kate Mayo</sc>, <i>his wife</i>
<sc>Captain Dick Scott</sc>, <i>of the bark</i> Sunda, <i>her brother</i>
<sc>Andrew Mayo</sc>, } <i>sons of James Mayo</i>
<sc>Robert Mayo</sc>, }
<sc>Ruth Atkins</sc>
<sc>Mrs. Atkins</sc>, <i>her widowed mother</i>
<sc>Mary</sc>
<sc>Ben</sc>, <i>a farm hand</i>
<sc>Doctor Fawcett</sc>
*/



23 Drama 123-02C                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** And this is the bottom of the page shown in the previous example.]


/*[*** This looks like a Table of Contents, but without page numbers, and was formatted as such.]
ACT I

<sc>Scene 1</sc>: The Road. Sunset of a day in spring.
<sc>Scene 2</sc>: The Farm House. The same night.

ACT II
(<i>Three years later</i>)

<sc>Scene 1</sc>: The Farm House. Noon of a summer day.
<sc>Scene 2</sc>: The top of a hill on the farm overlooking the sea. The
following day.

ACT III
(<i>Five years later</i>)

<sc>Scene 1</sc>: The Farm House. Dawn of a day in late fall.
<sc>Scene 2</sc>: The Road. Sunrise.
*/



23 Drama 123-03A                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** Normally, we format the Cast of ]
[*** Characters as a single-spaced   ]
[*** list. Here, the printed page    ]
[*** looks more like a 2-column      ]
[*** table, and that's how it was    ]
[*** formatted. Long lines were not  ]
[*** rejoined, and blank lines were  ]
[*** placed between each entry to    ]
[*** make the result more readable.  ]

[*** As with many other examples in  ]
[*** this Category, asking for       ]
[*** guidance in the Project         ]
[*** Discussion would be an excellent]
[*** idea.                           ]

[*** The next example shows the      ]
[*** actual formatting.              ]



23 Drama 123-03B                 Updated  2011/03/15




CHARACTERS


[*** Column alignment allowed for _Plain Text_ italics]
[*** Next example shows this in _Plain Text_.]
/*
<sc>Renier Lusignan</sc>            <i>A Descendant of the Lusignan
                               Kings of Cyprus</i>

<sc>Berengere</sc>                  <i>His Wife</i>

<sc>Amaury</sc>                     <i>His Son, Commander of Famagouste
                               under the Venetians</i>

<sc>Yolanda</sc>                    <i>The Ward of Berengere, betrothed
                               to Amaury</i>

<sc>Camarin</sc>                    <i>A Baron of Paphos, Guest in the
                               Lusignan Castle</i>

<sc>Vittia Pisani</sc>              <i>A Venetian Lady, also a Guest</i>

<sc>Moro</sc>                       <i>A Priest</i>

<sc>Hassan</sc>                     <i>Warden of the Castle</i>

<sc>Halil</sc>                      <i>His Son, a Boy</i>

<sc>Tremitus</sc>                   <i>A Physician</i>

<sc>Olympio</sc>                    <i>A Greek Boy, serving Amaury</i>

<sc>Alessa</sc>                   }
<sc>Maga</sc>                     } <i>Berengere's Women</i>
<sc>Civa</sc>                     }
<sc>Mauria</sc>                   }

<sc>Smarda</sc>                     <i>Slave To Vittia</i>

<sc>Pietro</sc>                     <i>In Vittia's pay</i>

<i>Priests, Acolytes, etc.</i>

<sc>Time</sc>--<i>The Sixteenth Century</i>
<sc>Place</sc>--<i>The Island of Cyprus</i>
*/



23 Drama 123-03C                 Updated  2011/07/29




CHARACTERS


[*** Column alignment allowed for _Plain Text_ italics]
[*** This is how the previous example will look in _Plain Text_.]
/*
RENIER LUSIGNAN            _A Descendant of the Lusignan
                               Kings of Cyprus_

BERENGERE                  _His Wife_

AMAURY                     _His Son, Commander of Famagouste
                               under the Venetians_

YOLANDA                    _The Ward of Berengere, betrothed
                               to Amaury_

CAMARIN                    _A Baron of Paphos, Guest in the
                               Lusignan Castle_

VITTIA PISANI              _A Venetian Lady, also a Guest_

MORO                       _A Priest_

HASSAN                     _Warden of the Castle_

HALIL                      _His Son, a Boy_

TREMITUS                   _A Physician_

OLYMPIO                    _A Greek Boy, serving Amaury_

ALESSA                   }
MAGA                     } _Berengere's Women_
CIVA                     }
MAURIA                   }

SMARDA                     _Slave To Vittia_

PIETRO                     _In Vittia's pay_

_Priests, Acolytes, etc._

TIME--_The Sixteenth Century_
PLACE--_The Island of Cyprus_
*/



23 Drama 123-04A                 Updated  2011/03/16




PERSONS OF THE DRAMA.


THE SAXON UNIT.
[*** Heading; goes OUTSIDE no-wrap]

/*
<sc>Canzler</sc>, chief of the Saxons.
<sc>Fritz</sc>, a shepherd.
<sc>Rudolph</sc>, }
<sc>Max</sc>,     }  foresters.
<sc>Conrad</sc>,  }
<sc>Hartzel</sc>, an old man.
<sc>Wiglaf</sc>, a gleeman.
<sc>Oswald</sc>, a shepherd, afterward a monk.
<sc>Selma</sc>, daughter of Canzler.
*/


THE ROMAN UNIT.

/*
<sc>Father Benedict</sc>, the village priest.
<sc>Father Paul</sc>, a friar.
<sc>Jardin</sc>, the bailiff.
<sc>Jacques Sar</sc>, an old crusader.
<sc>Jules Bacqueur</sc>, the smith.
<sc>Hugh Capet</sc>, the barber.
<sc>Madam Bacqueur</sc>, wife of Jules Bacqueur.
<sc>Madam Valmy</sc>, a country woman.
<sc>Rachel</sc>, aunt of Madam Valmy.
<sc>Rosa</sc>, granddaughter of Rachel.
<sc>A Boy.</sc>
*/



23 Drama 123-05A                 Updated  2011/07/29




LADY INGER OF ÖSTRÅT
[*** Play Title: Major Division.]

DRAMA IN FIVE ACTS
[*** Sub-title of Play Title]




ACT FIRST
[*** Act = Chapter: Major Division.]


[*** Stage Directions are part of the body,]
[*** not part of the heading.              ]
/#[*** Hanging indent: use Block Quote     ]
<i>A room at Östråt. Through an open door in the
back, the Banquet Hall is seen in faint
moonlight, which shines fitfully through a
deep bow-window in the opposite wall. To
the right, an entrance-door; further forward,
a curtained window. On the left, a
door leading to the inner rooms; further
forward a large open fireplace, which casts
a glow over the room. It is a stormy evening.</i>

[*** Stage Directions often are in italics, with  ]
[*** character names often in small-caps.         ]
[*** If the Project Comments / Discussion do not  ]
[*** state whether italics should be closed and   ]
[*** re-opened around each small-caps, or remain  ]
[*** open for the paragraph, then ASK which is    ]
[*** preferred. The default is to close / reopen  ]
[*** them each time (match the scan).             ]
[*** If the names are in Upright normal font,     ]
[*** ASK. The default still is to close / reopen  ]
[*** the italics each time.                       ]
[*** Also notice that lines in non-Metrical Drama ]   
[*** always are left-justified.                   ]
[*** The rest of this page is in the next example,]
[*** along with the closing Block Quote tag.      ]



23 Drama 123-05B                 Updated  2011/04/13

[*** This is the bottom of the page shown in the previous example.]

<sc>Biörn</sc> <i>and</i> <sc>Finn</sc> <i>are sitting by the fireplace.
The latter is occupied in polishing a helmet.
Several pieces of armour lie near
them, along with a sword and shield.</i>
#/[*** Opening tag is near the top of the page, shown in previous example.]

<sc>Finn.</sc>

[*** Brackets are containers, go OUTSIDE markups]
[<i>After a pause.</i>] Who was Knut[1] Alfson?

<sc>Biörn.</sc>

My Lady says he was the last of Norway's
knighthood.

[Footnote 1: Pronounce <i>Knoot</i>.]



23 Drama 123-06A                 Updated  2011/07/29




ACT I[*** Act=Chapter. 4/2 spacing]


/#[*** Hanging indents, surround with Block quotes. ]
[*** Italicize each paragraph separately.           ]
[*** The scene number and the period should be      ]
[*** INSIDE the small-caps, just as a Date would be.]
<sc>Scene 1.</sc> <i>A room in Peter Vetrova's cottage. Door opens
centre rear into a little yard beyond which is the village
street. Centre right, door into Lavrov's room. Right
second entrance leads to kitchen and garden. Between
the two doors right a large brick stove whitewashed and
at present unused. Shelf above stove. A loom stands
in right hand corner rear. A window in rear wall
between loom and door. Before window a small table on
which are student's books and papers. On left side of
door a small, rude cabinet is built in the wall about six
feet from floor. A wide bench stands under cabinet. A
small high window in left wall. Near front, very high
up on wall left, hangs a half length portrait of the
Saviour.</i>

<i>A table left of centre. Bench before loom. Two or three
stools, one or two plain chairs; and a larger chair, of
peasant make, near table centre.</i>

<i>Glimpses of grass and a fruit-tree in bloom seen through
open door and window rear.</i>

<i>Vetrova discovered, making bark shoes. Catherine sits
near him in the large chair, sewing. Vera at loom.
Vasil in door rear with violin. He ceases playing as
curtain rises.</i>
#/

<i>Vetrova.</i> That brings back young days, mother.

<i>Catherine.</i> The summer is getting into your head,
Petrovich.



23 Drama 123-07A                 Updated  2011/04/20




MARY TUDOR[*** Play Title: Major Division]




<i>FIRST DAY</i>[*** First Act - new Chapter]

A MAN OF THE PEOPLE[*** sub-heading of Act]

/#[*** Hanging Indent, needs Block Quote]
<sc>Scene.</sc>--<i>Border of the Thames. A deserted
strand. An old parapet in ruins, conceals
the borders of the water. To the
right, a house of mean appearance. At
the corner of this house, a statuette of the
Virgin, at whose feet burns a wick in an
iron lattice. In the background, beyond
the Thames, London. Two high buildings
are seen--the Tower of London and
Westminster. The sun is setting</i>[** .?]
#/[*** End of headings: 2 blank lines]


SCENE I[*** Scenes are new Sections]
[*** Rest of page is shown in the next example.]



23 Drama 123-07B                 Updated  2013/05/27

[*** Continuation of page begun in the previous example. ]


SCENE I[*** Scenes are new Sections: 2 blank lines above.]

[*** Below, the Small-caps are OUTSIDE the    ]
[*** italics, in accordance with standard     ]
[*** Guidelines. Some Project Managers prefer ]
[*** to use just one set of small-caps around ]
[*** the entire list, so check the Project    ]
[*** Comments and Discussion, and if this     ]
[*** hasn't been covered already, ASK.        ]
/#
<i>Several men are grouped here and there on the
Strand, among whom are</i> <sc>Simon Renard</sc>,
<sc>John Bridges</sc>, <sc>Baron Chandos</sc>, <sc>Robert
Clinton</sc>, <sc>Anthony Brown</sc>, <sc>Viscount of
Montague</sc>
#/

LORD CHANDOS.

You are right, my lord, this damned Italian
must have bewitched the Queen. She can't ex-*



23 Drama 123-08A                 Updated  2011/03/15




SPREADING THE NEWS


/#[*** Hanging Indent. Use Block Quote.]
[*** Use separate italics for "Scene" and the Setting,]
[*** and the Colon goes OUTSIDE the markups.]
<i>Scene</i>: <i>The outskirts of a Fair. An Apple Stall,
Mrs. Tarpey sitting at it. Magistrate and
Policeman enter.</i>
#/

[*** Colon is separator, goes OUTSIDE markups.]
<i>Magistrate</i>: So that is the Fair Green. Cattle
and sheep and mud. No system. What a repulsive
sight!

<i>Policeman</i>: That is so, indeed.

<i>Magistrate</i>: I suppose there is a good deal of
disorder in this place?

<i>Policeman</i>: There is.

<i>Magistrate</i>: Common assault?

<i>Policeman</i>: It's common enough.

<i>Magistrate</i>: Agrarian crime, no doubt?

<i>Policeman</i>: That is so.

<i>Magistrate</i>: Boycotting? Maiming of cattle?
Firing into houses?

<i>Policeman</i>: There was one time, and there
might be again.

<i>Magistrate</i>: That is bad. Does it go any farther
than that?

<i>Policeman</i>: Far enough, indeed.



23 Drama 123-09A                 Updated  2011/04/13

<sc>Finn.</sc>[*** Period goes INSIDE]

A knight? Nay, that can scarce be.

<sc>Biörn.</sc>

Why not?

<sc>Finn.</sc>

Did you not say yourself: the last of our
knighthood is dead and gone?

[<i>Goes out to the right.</i>
[*** This Stage Direction is right-justified]
[*** and on a line of its own. There is no]
[*** universal standard as to how it should]
[*** be formatted, so always check the]
[*** Project Comments and Discussion, and]
[*** if it isn't covered, ASK.]
[*** Unpaired bracket is common & OK.]

<sc>Biörn.</sc>

The accursed knave, with his prying and peering!
What avails all my striving to hide and
hush things? They whisper of her even
now--; soon all men will be shouting aloud
that----
[*** Rest of page is in the next example.]



23 Drama 123-09B                 Updated  2011/04/13

[*** Continuation of page begun in the previous example.]

<sc>Elina.</sc>

[<i>Comes in again through the door on the left;
looks round her, and says with suppressed emotion</i>:]
Are you alone, Biörn?
[*** colon is not part of the Stage Directions.]
[*** It's a separator and goes OUTSIDE markups.]
[*** Dialog is part of same "paragraph" as Directions.]

<sc>Biörn.</sc>

Is it you, Mistress Elina?

<sc>Elina.</sc>

Come, Biörn, tell me one of your stories; I
know you can tell others than those that----

<sc>Biörn.</sc>

A story? Now--so late in the evening----?



23 Drama 123-10A                 Updated  2011/04/13

[*** Left-justify, blank line on each side.]
<sc>Brooke Twombley.</sc>[*** small-caps.]

Haw, haw! If you'll wait a few minutes you'll
see an imposing display of trains and feathers.
Some of them are coming on here after the ceremony
to drink tea, I believe.

<sc>Valentine White.</sc>

Trains and feathers! Good gracious, Brooke,
Imogen must have grown up!

<sc>Brooke Twombley.</sc>

Here's her portrait--what?

<sc>Valentine White.</sc>

[<i>Staring at the portrait.</i>] I am right, Brooke--she
<i>has</i> grown up!

<sc>Brooke Twombley.</sc>

Haw!

<sc>Valentine White.</sc>

Eight years ago she was a romp, with a frock that
always had a tear in it, and a head like a cornfield
in the wind. Just look at this! While I've been
away they've given her a new frock and brushed
her hair. What an awful change!
[*** Rest of page is shown in the next example.]



23 Drama 123-10B                 Updated  2011/04/13

her hair. What an awful change![*** Continuation of page begun in the previous example.]

[*** Stage Directions that are not on Dialog lines should]
[*** be left-justified and treated as paragraphs.]
[*** Brackets are containers, go OUTSIDE markups.]
[<sc>Probyn</sc> <i>appears at the conservatory entrance</i>.]

<sc>Probyn.</sc>

Lady Euphemia Vibart.

/#[*** Hanging Indent. Use Block Quote.]
[*** When small-caps appear within italics,]
[*** follow Guidelines and close/reopen the]
[*** italics each time. Some Project Managers]
[*** prefer just one set of italics around]
[*** the entire "paragraph," so if this]
[*** isn't covered in the Project Comments, ASK.]
[<sc>Lady Euphemia Vibart</sc>, <i>a handsome, distinguished-looking,
and elegantly dressed girl of about
twenty, enters. She scarcely notices</i> <sc>Valentine</sc>,
<i>who bows formally</i>.]
#/



23 Drama 123-11A                 Updated  2011/07/29

the jade cup of nothingness. I am a lover bereft
of my mate.

<sc>Fate</sc>--You must live! (<i>Touches Chang's arm
with staff. The knife falls to the ground. Property
Man picks it up, and puts it back in the property
box.</i>)

<sc>Chang-sut-yen</sc>--Kwen-lin, I leap across the
river of Heaven to your arms!

<sc>Fate</sc>--She is not dead. She dreams, and smiles
upon the bosom of the water.

[*** This Play uses parentheses, not brackets. Parentheses are]
[*** containers, and go OUTSIDE the markups.]
(<i>To Kwen-lin.</i>) Awake! Awake!

(<i>Kwen-lin enters, and goes to Chang.</i>)

<sc>Fate</sc>--Your sublime father, Chang-won-yin, has
gone to his ancestors. You are Chang-sut-yen, the
Great, ruler of this province.

(<i>Gong-bearer strikes gong.</i>)

<sc>Chang-sut-yen</sc>--I renounce my rule. I am a
lover, not a ruler.

[*** Are Stage Directions below right-justified or just on same]
[*** line as Dialog? If right-justified, precede with 6 spaces.]
[*** If you can't tell, leave a note. In non-metrical Drama,   ]
[*** Directions usually are NOT right-justified ... usually.   ]
<sc>Fate</sc>--You are a turtle dove. (<i>To Mandarin.</i>)
To your home, and set forth majestic feasting.
Chang-sut-yen will honor your house. He rules.

<sc>Chang-sut-yen</sc>--I rule not. I am a lover.

<sc>Kwen-lin</sc>--Exalted one, a lover is a turtle dove.

<sc>Fate</sc>--It is sometimes given to women to know
the truth. Thus Fate is fulfilled, and Chang-sut-yen,
the turtle dove, will live upon a Willow plate.

(<i>Gong-bearer strikes the gong twice.</i>)

(<i>CURTAIN</i>)[** extra white space after this]
[*** Leave a [**note] so Post-Processor can decide whether to]
[*** use 1 or 2 blank lines here.]


<sc>Chorus</sc>--For your eager ears, for your shining
eyes, for your smiling faces, I bow, I bow, I bow.

(<i>Chorus followed by the Gong-bearer goes behind
the curtains.</i>)



23 Drama 123-12A                 Updated  2011/04/20




LITERATURE

<sc>A Comedy By Arthur Schnitzler</sc>


[*** Colon is separator, goes OUTSIDE markups.]
[<sc>Scene</sc>: <i>Moderately well, but quite
inexpensively furnished apartments occupied
by Margaret. A small fireplace, a
table, a small escritoire, a settee, a wardrobe
cabinet, two windows in the back,
entrances left and right.</i>

[*** Mark each italics paragraph separately.]
<i>As the curtain rises, Clement, dressed
in a modish, tarnished-gray sack suit, is
discovered reclining in a fauteuil near
the fireplace. He is smoking a cigarette
and perusing a newspaper. Margaret
is standing at the window. She walks
back and forth, finally goes up directly
behind Clement, and playfully musses
his hair. Evidently she has something
troublesome on her mind.</i>]
[*** Brackets are containers, go OUTSIDE.]

[*** Names are abbreviated. Period INSIDE.]
[*** (It would go INSIDE anyway, but a]
[*** Colon would go OUTSIDE the markups.)]
<sc>Clem.</sc> [<i>reading, seizes her hand and
kisses it</i>]. Horner's certain about his
pick and doubly certain about mine;
Waterloo five to one; Barometer twenty-one
to one; Busserl seven to one; Attila
sixteen to one.

<sc>Marg.</sc> Sixteen to one!

<sc>Clem.</sc> Lord Byron one and one-half
to one--that's us, my dear.

<sc>Marg.</sc> I know.
[*** Rest of text omitted from example]



23 Drama 123-13A                 Updated  2013/05/27

<sc>His N.</sc> You don't wait till I've <i>done</i>, Sir! I <i>didn't</i> obtain it--not
at first. The man made excuses. I was prepared for <i>that</i>. I told
him plainly, "I know what <i>you</i>'re thinking--it's a cheap fish, and you
fancy I'm ordering it out of economy!"

[*** Close and reopen italics around the small-caps, unless Project ]
[*** Comments or Discussion say they should remain open.            ]
<sc>Culch.</sc> (<i>raising his eyebrows for</i> <sc>Miss T.'s</sc> <i>benefit</i>). Of course, he
naturally <i>would</i> think so. And <i>that</i> is how you got your tunny?
I see.

[*** These Stage Directions are right-justified and on lines of their own. ]
[*** There is no universal agreement as to how they should be formatted,   ]
[*** so always check the Project Comments and Discussion, and if it isn't  ]
[*** covered, ASK.  The Stage Directions in this project were not          ]
[*** discussed, but always appear as indented Hanging Indents, so they     ]
[*** should be in Block Quotes.                                            ]
/#
[<sc>Mr. Bellerby</sc> <i>stares at him suspiciously, and decides to suppress
the remainder of his tunny</i>.
#/

<sc>Miss T.</sc> This hotel seems to be thinning some. We've three ghosts
right in front of us this evening.



24 Metrical_Drama 124-00A                 Updated  2011/05/01

[*** METRICAL DRAMA is an advanced topic with special formatting requirements. These    ]
[*** examples only show some common situations. Please refer to the Guidelines, the     ]
[*** Metrical Drama MasterClass, and the Forum's Drama and Metrical Drama discussions   ]
[*** for further information.                                                           ]
 
[*** ********************************************************************************** ]
[*** * Preferences vary among Project Managers and Post-Processors, so it is essential  ]
[*** * to read each Project's Comments and Discussion, and to ask for guidance.         ]
[*** ********************************************************************************** ]
 
[*** These examples are presented differently from others in this Library, because full ]
[*** pages often must be shown, but doing that makes this text too small to read.  So,  ]
[*** a Full Page Image often will be shown first, without its text but with some        ]
[*** comments, and followed by excerpts of the image and text.                          ]
[*** You can magnify the examples by ZOOMING with your Browser ( Ctrl + and Ctrl - ).   ]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-00B                 Updated  2011/03/16

  




DRAMATIS PERSONÆ[*** Major Division: 4/2 spacing]


/*[*** Normal list. Single-space.]
KANDAULES, <i>King of Lydia</i>.
RHODOPE, <i>his Queen</i>.
GYGES, <i>a Greek</i>.[*** periods OUTSIDE]
LESBIA  }
HERO    }  <i>Slave Maidens</i>.
THOAS  }
KARNA  }    <i>Slaves</i>.
THE PEOPLE.
*/

[*** Wrappable.]
<i>The action is prehistoric and mythical. It takes place within
a period of twenty-four hours.</i>



24 Metrical_Drama 124-01A                 Updated  2011/04/20

 
<i>Hymn to the Dawn</i>

[For music, see p. 61]

/*[*** no-wrap, and keep indentation]
Wake, Aurora, Wake!
      Come, rosy-fingered goddess of the dawn,
      The saffron couch of old Tithonus scorning;
      Fling wide the golden portals of the morning,
      And bid the gloomy mists of night be gone.

Hail, Aurora, Hail!
      The dewy stars have sped their silent flight,
      The fuller glories of thy rays expecting;
      With rosy beauty from afar reflecting,
      Thy Orient steeds come panting into sight.

Rise, Apollo, Rise!
      Send forth thy healing rays to greet the world,
      Upon the lands thy blessed radiance streaming;
      Arise, and fling afar, in splendor gleaming,
      The banners of thy golden light unfurled.
*/
[*** Rest of page in next example.]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-01B                 Updated  2011/04/20

[*** Continuation of page begun in previous example.]

/#
Enter Æneas and Achates, on their way into the city, evidently attracted
hither by the singing. Æneas is resplendent in full armor. Achates wears
the Phrygian costume: long trousers of brown, a tunic of deep old blue, ornate
with embroidered patterns in gold and purple thread; over this a traveling
cloak of brown. He carries two spears. The maidens withdraw and
as their voices grow fainter Æneas and Achates kneel before the altar. The
light brightens. A bugle call in the distance rouses them from their devotion.
They arise. Enter Venus, dressed as a huntress.
#/

<i>Venus</i> (<i>Æneid</i>, I. 321-324):

/*[*** Metrical=verse, so all Dialog must be in no-wrap]
I crave your grace, good sirs. If my attendant maids
Have chanced to wander hither, quiver-girt, and clad
In tawny robes of fur, the trophies of the chase,
Or with triumphant shouts close pressing in pursuit
The foaming boar,--I fain would know their course.
*/



24 Metrical_Drama 124-02A                 Updated  2011/04/20




THE SAXONS[*** Play Title. Major Division.]




ACT ONE.[*** Act = Chapter. Major Division.]


/#[*** Hanging Indent. Mark with Block Quotes.]
<i>SCENE ONE--A road through a forest. On either side
trees stand thick and dark. Immediately in front the light
sifts down upon a rude bridge spanning a narrow stream.
At the roadside, to the right, a large crucifix, apparently
new, stands upon a post some ten feet in height. It is
elaborately carved and is set in a deep frame to protect it
from the weather. At the foot of the post, cut into the
mossy bank which slopes toward the road, is a kneeling
place with a white sheep's pelt lying upon it.</i>

<i>A sound of voices is heard. Fritz and Rudolph enter
from the left and pause where a path leads off through
the wood. The latter has an ax upon his shoulder. Far in
the forest a faint sound of chopping is heard.</i>

<i>TIME--Mid-day in summer, in the early part of the thirteenth
century.</i>
#/
[*** (Rest of page shown in next example.)]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-02B                 Updated  2011/04/20

[*** (Continuation of previous example.)]
[*** Indented Dialog lines indicate interruptions or transitions.]
[*** Align the beginning of such lines with the ends of the]
[*** preceding Dialog lines. Do this BEFORE adding in-line]
[*** markups, and allow for how those markups will appear in]
[*** Plain Text: small-caps are converted to all Upper-case, so]
[*** they take no extra space (unlike Italics or Boldface).]
[*** Therefore, aligning first and then doing the markups will]
[*** give the correct result.]
[*** Some Post-Processors want the interruption to be offset]
[*** one space to the right of the end of the preceding line]
[*** as shown here, while others prefer other alignments.]
[*** If it isn't covered in the Project Comments or Discussion,]
[*** ASK.]

/*
<sc>Rudolph</sc>--He's worth six.

<sc>Fritz</sc>--                  I'll give you five, you pick them.

<sc>Rudolph</sc>--I'll pick six.

<sc>Fritz</sc>--                 I'll keep my ewes, then.

<sc>Rudolph</sc>--                                        And walk
To the mountains?

<sc>Fritz</sc>--    We have not gone yet.

<sc>Rudolph</sc>--                        But--

<sc>Fritz</sc>--And if I had my way we would not go.

<sc>Rudolph</sc>--Nor would we go had I mine, Fritz. But we
Have not our way. The dragon has his way.
As far as Niflheim the North is red.

<sc>Fritz</sc>--Are we their sheep that we must follow them
Or be hung up on trees?
*/



24 Metrical_Drama 124-03A                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** Next 3 examples show]
[*** the formatting.     ]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-03B                 Updated  2013/05/27




MADONNA DIANORA

<sc>A Play in Verse By Hugo von Hofmannsthal</sc>


/*
<sc>La demente</sc>: "<i>Conosci la storia di Madonna Dianor?</i>"
[*** Placement of quotation marks: they are containers and go OUTSIDE the italics markups. Well, ]
[*** that works on the line above, but not on the line below, because the closing quotation mark ]
[*** is smack in the middle of the italicized dialog. We don't want one to be in italics when    ]
[*** its mate is upright, so there are two choices: put both in italics (as shown here), or use  ]
[*** two sets of italics and leave the quotation marks outside both sets. In _Plain Text_ that   ]
[*** would look very strange.                                                                    ]

<sc>Il Medico</sc>: <i>"Vagamente. Non ricordo piu."...[*** rejoin lines split by paper width    ]
    Sogno d'un mattino di primavera.</i>[*** A separate line. Keep indentation, even # spaces.   ]
*/

[<sc>Scene</sc>: <i>The garden of a somber Lombardian
Palace. To the right the wall of
a house, which is at an angle with the
moderately high garden wall that encloses</i>



24 Metrical_Drama 124-03C                 Updated  2011/03/16

[*** Brackets are containers, go OUTSIDE]
[*** Colon is separator, goes OUTSIDE]
[<sc>Scene</sc>: <i>The garden of a somber Lombardian
Palace. To the right the wall of
a house, which is at an angle with the
moderately high garden wall that encloses
it. The lower portion of the house is
built of rough granite, above which rests
a strip of plain marble forming a sill,
which, under each window, is adorned
with a lion's head in repose. Two windows
are visible, each one having a small
angular balcony with a stone railing,
spaced sufficiently to show the feet of
those standing there. Both windows are
curtained to the floor. The garden is a
mere lawn with a few scattered fruit
trees. The corner of the garden between
the wall and the house is crowded with
high box wood bushes. A leafy grape-*vine,
trained over stunted chestnut trees,
forms an arbor which completely fills the
left side of the stage; only this entrance
is visible. The arbor slants irregularly
to the left rear. Behind the rear wall
there may be seen (by the gallery spectator)
a narrow path beyond which is
the neighbor's garden wall--no house is
visible. In the neighbor's garden and as
far as the eye can reach, the tops of the
trees are illuminated by the evening glow
of a brilliant sunset.</i>]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-03D                 Updated  2011/04/20

[*** Metrical = verse: non-wrappable]

/*
<sc>Dianora</sc> [<i>at the window</i>].

A harvester I see, and not the last,
No, not the last, descending from the hill.
There are three more, and there, and there!
[*** Verse, so rejoin lines split by printer]
[*** because of narrow columns or paper.]
Have you no end, you never-ending day?
How have I dragged the hours away from you,
Torn them to shreds and cast them in the flood,
*/
[*** This example shows only a fragment of]
[*** the page, and this closing no-wrap was]
[*** added to the example to keep the no-wraps]
[*** balanced. On the actual page, the closing]
[*** no-wrap was at the very end of the page,]
[*** not at the end of each column.]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-04A                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** This page has Major Divisions]
[*** that require 4/2 spacing, a  ]
[*** new scene, Stage Directions, ]
[*** and deeply indented Dialog   ]
[*** lines.  We will discuss them ]
[*** in the next 4 examples.      ]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-04B                 Updated  2011/03/16




HEBBEL'S PLAYS[*** Book Title: Major Division.]




GYGES AND HIS RING[*** Play Title: Major Division.]




ACT I[*** Act = Chapter: Major Division.]


<sc>Scene 1</sc>[*** Scene = Section, already spaced.]

<i>A Hall</i>

/#[*** Hanging Indent. Mark with Block Quote.]
<i>Enter</i> <sc>Kandules</sc> <i>and</i> <sc>Gyges</sc>. <sc>Kandules</sc> <i>buckles
on his sword</i>. <sc>Thoas</sc> <i>follows with the diadem</i>.
#/



24 Metrical_Drama 124-04C                 Updated  2019/01/20

[*** Metrical Drama: No-wrap the dialog.                                                ]
[*** The period after Speaker's name goes INSIDE the tags.                              ]

/*
<sc>Kandules.</sc> To-day you'll see what Lydia can achieve!
I know you Grecians, though your necks are bended,
Just for your standstill plight bear the old yoke
With gnashing teeth and lip-curl at your lords.
No thing on earth were easily invented
You were not quick to better, were't alone
The crown you add, you set it on--and lo,
The thing's your work, you see that it is good!
*/

[*** Right-justified Stage Directions: The Formatting Guidelines require right-aligned  ]
[*** text to be left-justified and surrounded by no-wrap tags. Use one set of no-wrap   ]
[*** tags around the verse and a separate set around such stage directions. (As shown   ]
[*** elsewhere, normal Stage Directions are wrappable, but often will need to be        ]
[*** surrounded by Block Quote tags.)                                                   ]
[***                                                                                    ]
[*** Some post-processors will request other approaches, so please review each          ]
[*** project's comments and discussion.                                                 ]
[*** (The instructions in this example were changed in January, 2019.)                  ]
/*
[<sc>Thoas</sc> <i>hands him the diadem</i>.
*/

/*
Bring the new diadem! What use is this?
Has your dolt's hand the sword as well mistaken?
*/

/*
[<i>Looks at his sword.</i>
*/



24 Metrical_Drama 124-04D                 Updated  2011/04/20

/*
Why yes, by Herakles whose feast we're holding!
What, Thoas, are you doddering ere your time?

<sc>Thoas.</sc> I thought----

[*** When Dialog lines up with end of previous line, it shows interruption or immediate]
[*** transition. To format with proper alignment, do the alignments first and add the]
[*** markups afterwards. Italics require some extra spacing, but small-caps do not.]
[*** The physical constraints of paper width prevented the final transition from being]        
[*** properly aligned in the Image, but we can (and should) align it here.]
<sc>Kan.</sc>                 Well, what?

[*** Another transition. Align it.]
<sc>Thoas.</sc>                           Not for five hundred years
Has King in other trapping graced the games
Your Ancestor, the Puissant, has stablished,
And when, the feast before, you made endeavour
To oust the hallowed things from olden honour,
The folk stood rooted, horrified, amazed,
Muttering as ne'er before.
*/
[*** Next example shows this in _Plain Text_]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-04E                 Updated  2011/04/20

[*** _Plain Text_ version of previous example: see how nicely the transitions line up.]

/*
Why yes, by Herakles whose feast we're holding!
What, Thoas, are you doddering ere your time?

THOAS. I thought----

KAN.                 Well, what?

THOAS.                           Not for five hundred years
Has King in other trapping graced the games
Your Ancestor, the Puissant, has stablished,
And when, the feast before, you made endeavour
To oust the hallowed things from olden honour,
The folk stood rooted, horrified, amazed,
Muttering as ne'er before.
*/



24 Metrical_Drama 124-05A                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** Next page of same book used in]
[*** previous example.             ]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-05B                 Updated  2011/03/17

/*

[*** Another transition. Align dialog]
[*** with end of last line of previous page.]
[*** Takes some extra work to find and check]
[*** a different page, especially if it]
[*** wasn't yours. Do it from "Page Details."]
<sc>Kan.</sc>                        And so you think
I should have marked their gapes for my salvation?
I've hit your thought?

[*** Lots of dialog alignment on this page.]
<sc>Thoas.</sc>                 Lord, not without a shudder
I touch this diadem, and not till now
Has hand of mine been closed on this sword's hilt
That all the seed of Herakles once brandished;
*/[*** (closure added to fragmentary example for balance)]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-05C                 Updated  2011/03/16

/*
Nor yet on Thetis, she who bade her daughters
For him be fisherfolk of pearl and coral
That thus his decking fail not of its fill.
But <i>this</i> sword--why, I knew the man that forged it,
And him by whom <i>this</i> diadem was pieced!
[*** Remember to look for in-line markups.]
[*** With complex pages, do one kind of formatting]
[*** at a time: do the spacing, then the alignment,]
[*** then the in-line formatting, then the no-wraps]
[*** and block quotes. Then, re-check the result!]

<sc>Kan.</sc> Eh, Gyges!

<sc>Thoas.</sc>         Sire, fair faith speaks out of me!
If I am overbold, 'tis for your welfare.
Believe my words, the many thousand folk
That stream t'assembly hither,--ay, albeit
They walk in finer wool and fare the daintier,--
Are just as fond or pious-prim as I.
This crown here and your head--these are for them,
Your henchman vouches, halves of a single whole,
And in like grade this sword here and your arm.
*/[*** (no-wraps inserted in fragments as reminders)]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-06A                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** This page has transitions ]
[*** and several kinds of Stage]
[*** Directions. We will cover ]
[*** each of them in the next  ]
[*** 3 examples.               ]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-06B                 Updated  2011/04/11

/*
But why bemoan it if for just this once
I so forgot me--sheer worn out, and loath
Only by force of heirloom garb to glitter,
Pass current just as minted coins pass current
By take-for-granted worth, and share with statues
That in the sacred temple-niches stand
A blind and blockish sacrosanctity?
You can't undo what's done.
*/

[*** This Project's Comments stated that right-justified Stage Directions]
[*** on lines of their own should be indented 4 spaces.]
[*** This is not standard, but there are no standards for this, so check]
[*** each Project's Comments and Directions, and if it's not covered, ASK.]
    [<sc>Thoas</sc> <i>comes with the new adornment</i>.

/*[*** self-interruption: Align to Dialog above.]
                             Ah, thus 'tis good!
*/

    [<i>He puts on the diadem.</i>[*** wrappable.]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-06C                 Updated  2011/04/14

/*
The noble stone that is not found among us,
It matters not how fair, is straitly banned.
I need not say I've left a place for such
As are unearthed in the next hundred years.
Now do you follow?
 
[*** These Stage Directions have to be in the no-wrap block because dialog is on the]
[*** same line. Dialog has to be aligned with the end of the previous line of dialog.]
[*** Do that before adding any in-line markup, and when doing so, account for the way]
[*** markups will appear in Plain Text: one underscore on each side for Italics,]
[*** no markups, just all upper-case, for Small caps:  _To_ GYGES.]
(<i>To</i> <sc>Gyges</sc>.)      That one fitly suits
Some massive giant-skull such as your sculptors
Are wont to give my forebear for a head-piece,
When in his lion-skin, with bulky club,
Towering above a streamlet's mossy rim,
You make him useful as a children's bogy.
*/

[*** indented 4 spaces as per Project Comments.]
    [<i>He girds on the sword.</i>



24 Metrical_Drama 124-06D                 Updated  2011/04/14

/*
No, but in space cramped human-small, like this!
Then, Thoas, spare the pains of a third sermon,
To-day I've heard the second.

<sc>Thoas.</sc>                       Pardon, sire![*** align interruption for]
And yet you know 'tis not the young man's limbs    [*** Plain Text (no s/c markups)]
In which a change of weather gives its warning,
It is the old man's bones that feel it first.      [<i>Exit.</i>
[*** Stage Directions stay on same line as dialog.]
[*** Use 6 spaces to indicate right-justification.]

<sc>Gyges.</sc> He goes in sorrow!
*/



24 Metrical_Drama 124-07A                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** This page has:           ]
[*** 1. Dialog continued from ]
[***    previous page;        ]
[*** 2. line numbers;         ]
[*** 3. a new Scene;          ]
[*** 4. long lines to unwrap; ]
[*** 5. indented lines.       ]
[*** The next 2 examples will ]
[*** show the formatting.     ]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-07B                 Updated  2011/04/14

/*
[*** Clearly continuation of dialog begun on previous page (not shown in these examples),]
[*** so no blank line at top. Precede line numbers with (at least) 6 spaces.] 
My sons shall carry for me to the bride.
Pay vows to Hecate, bring the sacrifice,      580
Set up the altars. Let the mounting flame
Envelop all the house.
*/



24 Metrical_Drama 124-07C                 Updated  2011/04/20

[*** Continuation of previous example.]


<sc>Scene IV</sc>[*** Scene = Section: 2 blank lines.]

/*
<i>Chorus.</i> Fear not the power of flame, nor swelling gale,
[*** unwrap text that overflowed due to paper width.]
Nor hurtling dart, nor cloudy wain that brings
The winter storms; fear not when Danube sweeps      585
Unchecked between its widely severed shores,
Nor when the Rhone hastes seaward, and the sun
Has broken up the snow upon the hills,
        And Hermes flows in rivers.[*** Indentation, not overflow; use even # of spaces.]
A wife deserted, loving while she hates,      590
Fear greatly; blindly burns her anger's flame,
*/[*** added to truncated example for balance.]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-08A                 Updated  2011/04/30

[*** The examples for this page will ]
[*** discuss its Stage Directions and]
[*** show the results in Plain Text. ]



24 Metrical_Drama 124-08B                 Updated  2011/03/17

/*
<i>Harp.</i> It was so determined;
But, for the further honour of your son,
And to observe the government of the city,
And with what rigour, or remiss indulgence,
The Christians are pursued, he makes his stay here:
*/

[<i>Trumpets.</i>
[** Does it belong at end of previous line?]
[*** Is "Trumpets." on its own line because that's where the playwright wanted it, or]
[*** because the paper was too narrow? Should it be moved up to the Dialog line and]
[*** be preceded by 6 spaces to avoid breaking up the Dialog? That's not a foofer's]
[*** decision, so just follow Guidelines: left-justify it, make it wrappable,]
[*** and leave a note for the Post-Processor. Or ASK in the Project Discussion.]

/*
For proof, his trumpets speak his near arrival.

<i>Sap.</i> Haste, good Sempronius, draw up our guards,
And with all ceremonious pomp receive
The conquering army. Let our garrison speak
Their welcome in loud shouts, the city show
Her state and wealth.

[*** Keep Stage Directions on same line, and precede with 6 spaces.]
<i>Semp.</i> I'm gone.        [<i>Exit.</i>
*/



24 Metrical_Drama 124-08C                 Updated  2011/07/29

[<i>Exit</i> <sc>Harpax</sc>.
[*** The Project Manager wanted right-justified Stage Directions that are on lines]
[*** of their own to be left-justified and unmarked. As stated elsewhere in these ]
[*** examples, there are no widely accecpted standards for this, so always check  ]
[*** the Project's Comments and Discussion, and if it isn't covered, ASK.         ]

/#[*** Hanging Indent, enclose in Block Quotes.                                   ]
[*** Guidelines require closing and reopening italics around small-cap names.     ]
[*** The result may be hard to read in _Plain Text_.  You can                     ]
[*** ask the Project Manger about enclosing all of this in a single pair of       ]
[*** italics markups and marking each small-caps within that ... but always       ]
[*** format by Guidelines unless the PM or PP says to do otherwise.               ]
<i>Enter</i> <sc>Sempronius</sc>, <i>at the head of the guard,
soldiers leading three kings bound</i>; <sc>Antoninus</sc>
<i>and</i> <sc>Macrinus</sc> <i>bearing the emperor's eagles</i>;
<sc>Dioclesian</sc> <i>with a gilt laurel on his head,
leading in</i> <sc>Artemia</sc>: <sc>Sapritius</sc> <i>kisses the
emperor's hand, then embraces his son</i>;
<sc>Harpax</sc> <i>brings in</i> <sc>Calista</sc> <i>and</i> <sc>Christeta</sc>.
<i>Loud shouts.</i>
#/

/*
<i>Diocle.</i> So: at all parts I find Cæsarea
Completely govern'd: the licentious soldier
Confined in modest limits, and the people
*/



24 Metrical_Drama 124-08D                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** This is how the previous example's in-line tags will look in _Plain Text_.]

[_Exit_ HARPAX.

/#
_Enter_ SEMPRONIUS, _at the head of the guard,
soldiers leading three kings bound_; ANTONINUS
_and_ MACRINUS _bearing the emperor's eagles_;
DIOCLESIAN _with a gilt laurel on his head,
leading in_ ARTEMIA: SAPRITIUS _kisses the
emperor's hand, then embraces his son_;
HARPAX _brings in_ CALISTA _and_ CHRISTETA.
_Loud shouts._
#/

/*
_Diocle._ So: at all parts I find Cæsarea
Completely govern'd: the licentious soldier
Confined in modest limits, and the people
*/



24 Metrical_Drama 124-08E                 Updated  2011/07/29

[*** This is how the previous example's in-line tags would look if the entire]
[*** "paragraph" were enclosed in a single pair of italics]

[_Exit_ HARPAX.

/#
_Enter SEMPRONIUS, at the head of the guard,
soldiers leading three kings bound; ANTONINUS
and MACRINUS bearing the emperor's eagles;
DIOCLESIAN with a gilt laurel on his head,
leading in ARTEMIA: SAPRITIUS kisses the
emperor's hand, then embraces his son;
HARPAX brings in CALISTA and CHRISTETA.
Loud shouts._
#/

/*
_Diocle._ So: at all parts I find Cæsarea
Completely govern'd: the licentious soldier
Confined in modest limits, and the people
*/



24 Metrical_Drama 124-09A                 Updated  2012/01/11

/*
I served in his face. Farewell. Adieu."
Welcome from Netherland, from steaming stew.
Ass to thy crib, doff that huge lion's skin,
Or else the owl will hoot and drive thee in.
For shame, for shame! lewd-living Tubrio,
Presume not troop among that gallant crew
Of true heroic spirits; come, uncase,
Show us the true form of Dametas' face.      120
Hence, hence, ye slave! dissemble not thy state,
But henceforth be a turncoat, runagate.
O hold my sides! that I may break my spleen
With laughter at the shadows I have seen!
  Yet I can bear with Curio's nimble feet,[*** just an indent, not new ¶]
Saluting me with capers in the street,
Although in open view and people's face,
He fronts me with some spruce, neat, cinquepace;
Or Tullus, though, whene'er he me espies,
Straight with loud mouth "A bandy, sir," he cries;       130
Or Robrus, who, addict to nimble fence,
Still greets me with stockado's violence.
These I do bear, because I too well know
They are the same they seem in outward show.
But all confusion sever from mine eye
This Janian bifront, Hypocrisy.
*/



24 Metrical_Drama 124-10A                 Updated  2014/07/10

hearing it, tries to escape from him. Death, however, explains
matters to him, and brings him into such a seraphic state of
mind that he exclaims--

/*
"Now welcome Death upon my Saviour's score
Who would not die to live for ever more.

<sc>Death.</sc>

Sir, I perceive you speak not without reason,
I'll leave you now and call some other season.

<sc>Blind Man.</sc>

Call when you please, I will await that call,
And while I can make ready for my fall;
In the mean time my constant prayers shall be,
From sudden and from endless Death, good Lord deliver me."
*/
[*** SPEAKERS' NAMES IN METRICAL DRAMA                                                               ]
[*** To preserve the line breaks, enclose Metrical Drama dialog in no-wraps. Include Speakers' names ]
[*** in those no-wraps, and left-justify them even when they're centered in the image.               ]
[*** When Speakers' names are on lines of their own, precede and follow them with a blank line.      ]



25 Advertisements 125-00A                 Updated  2011/08/02

[*** OVERVIEW OF ADVERTISEMENTS: (Those are just Thumbnails; the Images later on are larger.)     ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** Formatting Ads is mostly like formatting any other text.  The "trick" is to determine the    ]
[*** elements (or units) on an Ad page and within an Ad, then separate them and format each unit. ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** 1. Use blank lines between Ads. Precede the first Ad page and any "large Ads" with 4 blank   ]
[***    lines. "Large Ads" are half-page (Thumbnail #1), full-page (Thumbs #2 & #3), and          ]
[***    multi-page (Thumb #4). Everything in this kind of Ad is from one publisher or company.    ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** 2. Use 2 blank lines between the small Ads on a page of all small Ads. They often look like  ]
[***    "classifieds" (Thumb #5). And, some fractional-page Ads (Thumb #6) may be small or large. ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** 3. Within large Ads, limited use of 2 blank lines may be appropriate, e.g., after the        ]
[***    heading, between independent listings, and before "contact" information at the bottom.    ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** 4. Unless requested by the Project Comments, don't use thought breaks in Ads or between      ]
[***    them, because most horizontal lines in Ads are decorative, not true thought breaks.       ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** 5. Tag everything requiring in-line markups. As usual, we do not mark lines that are         ]
[***    entirely in boldface.                                                                     ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** 6. Use Block Quotes /# #/ around hanging indents and paragraphs that are in a smaller font   ]
[***    than other paragraphs. But, we don't mark font or size changes in headings.               ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** 7. Enclose lists and other material whose lines must not be rewrapped in No-Wrap /* */ .     ]
[***    We also tag right-justified lines, but not centered ones.                                 ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** 8. Tag any illustrations, and move them to a paragraph break or the top of the Ad or page.   ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** Proper "Spacing" and "Blocks" in some Ads won't always be clear-cut, and in those cases, use ]
[*** your best judgement.                                                                         ]
[***                                                                                              ]
[*** You can do these steps in any sequence, but as always, doing the in-line markups is the most ]
[*** important of all: it's easy for the Post-Processor to find blank lines if they need to be    ]
[*** changed, but the only way to find an overlooked italics is to go through each page Image     ]
[*** with the same attention to detail that we (are supposed to) do as Formatters.                ]



25 Advertisements 125-00B                 Updated  2011/07/22




BOOKS BY A. NEELY HALL

<i>8vo. Cloth. Illustrated with hundreds of full-page
and working drawings by the author
and Norman P. Hall</i>


/*
<b>THE BOY CRAFTSMAN</b>              { Price <i>net</i> $ 1.60
                                 { Postpaid      1.82

<b>HANDICRAFT FOR HANDY BOYS</b>      { Price <i>net</i> $ 2.00
                                 { Postpaid      2.25

<b>THE HANDY BOY</b>                  { Price <i>net</i> $ 1.60
                                 { Postpaid      1.82
*/


LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO., BOSTON

[*** A simple, full-page Ad, with a heading, brief description, ]
[*** list of books, and the publisher's "contact" information.  ]
[*** The next example shows how the in-line markups will look   ]
[*** in the Plain Text version of this page.                    ]



25 Advertisements 125-00C                 Updated  2011/07/22




BOOKS BY A. NEELY HALL

_8vo. Cloth. Illustrated with hundreds of full-page
and working drawings by the author
and Norman P. Hall_


/*
=THE BOY CRAFTSMAN=              { Price _net_ $ 1.60
                                 { Postpaid      1.82

=HANDICRAFT FOR HANDY BOYS=      { Price _net_ $ 2.00
                                 { Postpaid      2.25

=THE HANDY BOY=                  { Price _net_ $ 1.60
                                 { Postpaid      1.82
*/


LOTHROP, LEE & SHEPARD CO., BOSTON

[*** This is how in-line formatting affects the final     ]
[*** appearance of the Plain Text version of the previous ]
[*** example (notice how everything lines up so nicely):  ]
[***                                                      ]
[*** 1. Italics almost always become underscores.         ]
[*** 2. Boldface usually become equals signs,             ]
[***    but other symbols sometimes are used.             ]
[*** 3. (Although not used here, small-caps just become   ]
[***    all upper-case, and take no extra room.)          ]
[*** 4. The six (or more) spaces within a no-wrap block   ]
[***    signal right-justification.                       ]



25 Advertisements 125-01A                 Updated  2011/07/22




/*
Copyright, 1918, by
W. J. WATT & COMPANY
*/


<i>OTHER BOOKS</i>

<i>By</i>
CHARLES NEVILLE BUCK

/*
<sc>The Key to Yesterday</sc>
<sc>The Lighted Match</sc>
<sc>The Portal of Dreams</sc>
<sc>The Call of the Cumberlands</sc>
<sc>The Battle Cry</sc>
<sc>The Code of the Mountains</sc>
<sc>Destiny</sc>
<sc>The Tyranny of Weakness</sc>
*/


/*
PRESS OF
BRAUNWORTH & CO.
BOOK MANUFACTURERS
BROOKLYN, N. Y.
*/

[*** The list is on the same page as the Copyright    ]
[*** notice, so a Section break between them seems to ]
[*** be appropriate.                                  ]
[***                                                  ]
[*** Using separate no-wraps for unrelated blocks of  ]
[*** material will help the Post-Processor.           ]



25 Advertisements 125-02A                 Updated  2011/07/27




[*** A list of the author's other books often appears near the front]
[*** of a book. Treat it like a Chapter.]
THE COLLECTED WORKS OF[*** The blank line is needed to prevent the  ]
                      [*** two text lines from being rewrapped.     ]
HENRIK IBSEN

<i>Copyright Edition. Complete in 11 Volumes.</i>
[*** The entire line is intended to be in italics, so include the]
[*** numbers in the single pair of tags.]

<i>Crown 8vo, price 4s. each.</i>

ENTIRELY REVISED AND EDITED BY

WILLIAM ARCHER[*** last "heading" line; follow with 2 blank lines]


/*
Vol. I.    Lady Inger, The Feast at Solhoug, Love's Comedy
Vol. II.   The Vikings, The Pretenders
Vol. III.  Brand
Vol. IV.   Peer Gynt
Vol. V.    Emperor and Galilean (2 parts)
Vol. VI.   The League of Youth, Pillars of Society
Vol. VII.  A Doll's House, Ghosts
Vol. VIII. An Enemy of the People, The Wild Duck
Vol. IX.   Rosmersholm, The Lady from the Sea
Vol. X.    Hedda Gabler, The Master Builder
Vol. XI.   Little Eyolf, John Gabriel Borkman, When We Dead Awaken
*/         [*** In lists, unwrap long lines such as I. and XI. ]


/*
<sc>London: WILLIAM HEINEMANN
21 Bedford Street, W.C.</sc>
*/
[*** No-wrap is used here so that the two lines could be in one set]
[*** of small-caps tags.  Note that both lines contain mixed       ]
[*** small-caps and ALL CAPS, and the second line contains numbers,]
[*** and all of those can be handled properly with one set of tags.]



25 Advertisements 125-03A                 Updated  2011/07/22




<i>By</i>

<sc>John Masefield</sc>


/*
Rosas
Gallipoli
Right Royal
The Faithful
Selected Poems
Lost Endeavour
A Mainsail Haul
Captain Magaret
Reynard the Fox
The Daffodil Fields
The Old Front Line
Multitude and Solitude
Collected Poems and Plays
Salt Water Poems and Ballads
Good Friday and Other Poems
The Tragedy of Pompey the Great
Philip the King and Other Poems
The Tragedy of Nan and Other Poems
Lollingdon Downs and Other Poems
The Story of a Round-House and Other Poems
The Locked Chest; and The Sweeps of Ninety-eight
The Everlasting Mercy and the Widow in the Bye Street
*/

[*** We don't bother identifying the presence of a border]



25 Advertisements 125-04A                 Updated  2011/07/10

[*** The next example shows]
[*** the formatting.]



25 Advertisements 125-04B                 Updated  2011/07/27

[*** See previous example for full-size copy of the Image.]




<i>Just published, in post 8vo. elegantly bound, price 10s. 6d. carefully revised,
and considerably enlarged, with additional Woodcuts of Patterns, etc.</i>

The Third Edition[*** don't use <f> </f> markups around blackletter (or anything else)]
                 [*** unless requested to do so in the Project Comments or Discussion.]

OF THE

HAND-BOOK OF NEEDLEWORK,

BEING A COMPLETE GUIDE TO EVERY KIND OF DECORATIVE
NEEDLEWORK, CROCHET, KNITTING, AND NETTING,
WITH A BRIEF HISTORICAL ACCOUNT
OF EACH ART.

BY

MISS LAMBERT.


Contents:

/*
CHAP.

    I. Introduction.[*** Aligning this kind of list may help the Post-Processor.]
   II. Tapestry.
  III. Materials in General.
   IV. Wool.
    V. Silk.
   VI. Gold and Silver.
  VII. Chenille, Braid, etc.
 VIII. Canvas.
   IX. Berlin Patterns.
    X. Implements.
   XI. Drawing Patterns for Embroidery, Braiding, etc.
  XII. Framing Work.
 XIII. Embroidery.
  XIV. Stitches.
   XV. Canvas Work.
  XVI. Braiding and Appliqué.
 XVII. Bead Work.
XVIII. Crochet.
  XIX. Knitting.
   XX. Netting.
  XXI. Needlework of the English Queens and Princesses.
 XXII. "The Praise of the Needle."
*/

WITH ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTEEN ILLUSTRATIVE ENGRAVINGS ON
WOOD, OF PATTERNS, IMPLEMENTS, ETC.


CRITICAL NOTICES OF THE WORK.

"One of Mr. <sc>Murray</sc>'s series of Handbooks, which seem destined to
embrace all the arts of life as well as all the sights in the world. Miss <sc>Lam-*</sc>
[*** (The continuation page is not in this Library.)]



25 Advertisements 125-05A                 Updated  2011/07/23




The Stories All Children Love Series


This set of books for children comprises some of the most
famous stories ever written. Each book has been a tried and
true friend in thousands of homes where there are boys and
girls. Fathers and mothers remembering their own delight
in the stories are finding that this handsome edition of old
favorites brings even more delight to their children. The
books have been carefully chosen, are beautifully illustrated,
have attractive lining papers, dainty head and tail
pieces, and the decorative bindings make them worthy of
a permanent place on the library shelves.

/*
Heidi  By JOHANNA SPYRI.  Translated by Elisabeth P. Stork.
The Cuckoo Clock  By MRS. MOLESWORTH.
The Swiss Family Robinson  Edited by G. E. MITTON.
The Princess and the Goblin  By GEORGE MACDONALD.
The Princess and Curdie  By GEORGE MACDONALD.
At the Back of the North Wind  By GEORGE MACDONALD.
A Dog of Flanders  By "OUIDA."
Bimbi  By "OUIDA."
Mopsa, the Fairy  By JEAN INGELOW.
The Chronicles of Fairyland  By FERGUS HUME.
Hans Andersen's Fairy Tales
*/

/#
Each large octavo, with from 8 to 12 colored illustrations.
Handsome cloth binding, decorated in gold and color.
$1.25 net, per volume.
#/



25 Advertisements 125-06A                 Updated  2011/07/19




Mr. John Longs's List of Publications


<i>POPULAR SIX SHILLING NOVELS</i>

In handsome cloth binding, crown 8vo.

/*
<b>REMEMBRANCE.</b>                       Mrs. <sc>Lovett Cameron</sc>. [<i>Shortly.</i>[** was rt. aligned on sep. line]
<b>MIDSUMMER MADNESS.</b>                 Mrs. <sc>Lovett Cameron</sc>.
<b>A DIFFICULT MATTER.</b>                Mrs. <sc>Lovett Cameron</sc>.
<b>A FAIR FRAUD.</b>                      Mrs. <sc>Lovett Cameron</sc>.[*** the 6 or more spaces signals right-alignment,]
<b>A DAUGHTER OF ENGLAND.</b>                   <sc>May Crommelin.</sc>[*** so this manual alignment wasn't necessary.]
*/


JOHN LONG, 13 & 14 Norris Street, Haymarket, London

And at all the Libraries and Booksellers
[*** No in-line markups were needed, so a blank line between these two "contact" lines is enough to prevent wrapping.]



25 Advertisements 125-08A                 Updated  2011/07/24




OUT-DOOR WORLD LIBRARY.


/#[*** These are Hanging Indents, so enclose in Block Quotes. ]
THE OUT-DOOR WORLD; or, Young Collector's
Handbook. By <sc>W. Furneaux</sc>, F.R.G.S. With 18
Plates, 16 of which are coloured, and 549 Illustrations in
the Text. Crown 8vo. 7<i>s.</i> 6<i>d.</i>
[*** We ignore font size changes within a line or paragraph,  ]
[*** so there's no markup here to indicate that the first     ]
[*** line of each entry is larger than the others.            ]
[*** Note how prices are tagged: number OUTSIDE, period INSIDE]

BUTTERFLIES AND MOTHS (<sc>British</sc>).
By <sc>W. Furneaux</sc>, F.R.G.S. With 12 coloured Plates and
241 Illustrations in the Text. 10<i>s.</i> 6<i>d.</i> net.
#/

<i>To be followed by</i>[*** goes OUTSIDE any Block Quotes]

/#
BRITISH BIRDS. By <sc>W. H. Hudson</sc>, F.Z.S.
With a Chapter on Structure and Classification by <sc>Frank
E. Beddard</sc>, F.R.S.

LIFE IN PONDS AND STREAMS.  By
<sc>W. Furneaux</sc>, F.R.G.S.
[*** The name is small-caps, but the initials of the]
[*** honorary title are just all-caps.]

BRITISH MAMMALS AND REPTILES.
#/

AND OTHER VOLUMES.[*** goes OUTSIDE any Block Quotes]


London: LONGMANS, GREEN, & CO.

New York: 15 East 16^{th} Street.



25 Advertisements 125-09A                 Updated  2011/07/10

[*** Formatted text in next example.]



25 Advertisements 125-09B                 Updated  2011/07/27

[*** Full-size Image in previous example]




THE LADIES' LIBRARY,

OF

RURAL HOUSEHOLD ECONOMY.


<i>The following Volumes are now Published</i>:

<sc>Vol. 1.--Gardening</sc>,

/#
With a Calendar of Practical Operations and Directions for every
Month in the Year. By <sc>Mrs. Loudon</sc>. With Illustrative Woodcuts.
<i>Sixth Edition.</i> Fcap. 8vo., 6s.
#/

<sc>Vol. 2.--Modern Botany</sc>;

/#
Or, a popular Introduction to the Natural System and Classification of
Plants. By <sc>Mrs. Loudon</sc>. With One Hundred and Fifty Illustrations.
Fcap. 8vo., 8s.
#/

<sc>Vol. 3.--Farming</sc>;

/#
Or, Plain Directions for Rearing all sorts of Domestic Poultry; with
the best mode of Managing the Dairy and Piggery, together with useful
Hints on the Rural Economy of small Families. By Author of "British
Husbandry." With Woodcuts. Fcap. 8vo.
#/

<sc>Vol. 4.--Domestic Cookery</sc>,

/#
Suited to the present advanced state of the Art, but founded upon
Principles of Economy and Practical Knowledge, and adapted for the
use of Private Families. By <sc>Mrs. Rundell</sc>. <i>Sixty-fifth Edition.</i>
Improved by the addition of Nine Hundred New Receipts, and a Chapter
on Indian Cookery. Fcap. 8vo., 6s.

<i>Of this Volume upwards of 280,000 copies have been sold.</i>
#/

[** Asterism] <i>Each Volume is strongly Bound in Cloth, and may be purchased separately.</i>
[*** Should say "inverted Asterism", but there's no room for that on the Example screen .]
[*** The "Turn over" was deleted because, like "continued", it doesn't apply to an eBook.]



25 Advertisements 125-10A                 Updated  2011/07/20

[*** This was a full-page Ad, but the items in the middle were cropped so it could fit on the example screen and still be readable]




<sc>ELEMENTARY WORKS for YOUNG PERSONS.</sc>


I.

/#
[*** Separate Block Quotes (for Hanging Indents) are needed here, since the Roman Numerals are sub-headings, not parts of the book titles.]
MRS. MARKHAM'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND, from the First
Invasion by the Romans, to the end of the Reign of William the Fourth, with
Conversations at the end of each Chapter. <i>Tenth Edition</i>, with numerous Woodcuts.
2 vols. 12mo. 12s.
#/

II.

/#
MRS. MARKHAM'S HISTORY OF FRANCE, from the Conquest
of Gaul by Julius Cæsar, to the Reign of Louis Philippe, with Conversations at the
end of each Chapter. <i>Fifth Edition</i>, with numerous Woodcuts. 2 vols. 12mo. 12s.
#/

III.

/#
BERTHA'S JOURNAL DURING A VISIT TO HER UNCLE
IN ENGLAND; with a variety of Interesting and Instructive Information. <i>Fifth
Edition.</i> 12mo. 7s. 6d.
#/


JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET.



25 Advertisements 125-11A                 Updated  2011/07/10

[*** Formatted text is in]
[*** next example.]



25 Advertisements 125-11B                 Updated  2011/07/23

[*** Full-size image is in previous example.]




J. T. HEADLEY'S WORKS.


/#
[*** Perhaps leave a note that the bold text is also in a different font]
<b>NAPOLEON AND HIS MARSHALS.</b> By <sc>J. T. Headley</sc>, 2 vols. 12mo, cloth[**,]
gilt. Illustrated with 12 Portraits, $2 50. 25th Thousand.

<b>WASHINGTON AND HIS GENERALS.</b> By <sc>J. T. Headley</sc>, 2 vols. 12mo, cloth,
gilt. Illustrated with 16 Portraits, $2 50. 22d Thousand.

<b>THE SACRED MOUNTAINS.</b> By <sc>J. T. Headley</sc>,

/*[*** No-wrap used around right-justified lines and ones with gaps between words.]
Illustrated with 12 engravings, by Burt, with designs by Lossing,      20th Thousand.
Do.      do.      do.,       12mo, cloth, gilt, $1 25.   [*** "Thousand." rejoined above]
*/

<b>SACRED SCENES AND CHARACTERS.</b> By <sc>J. T. Headley</sc>,

/*
with 12 Illustrations. Designed by Darley,      4th Thousand.[*** right-justified]
Do.      do.       do.,     1 vol. 12mo.[**,] cloth, gilt, $1 25.
*/

<b>LETTERS FROM ITALY AND ALPS AND THE RHINE.</b> By <sc>J. T
Headley</sc>, 1 vol. 12mo.[**,] cloth. A New Edition. Revised and Enlarged. With a Portrait
of the Author, $1 13. 8th Thousand.

<b>LIFE OF OLIVER CROMWELL.</b> By <sc>J. T. Headley</sc>, 1 vol. 12mo.[**,] cloth, gilt,
with Portrait, $1 25. 6th Thousand.

<b>J. T. HEADLEY'S WORKS</b>--Uniform Edition, 12 vols., in sheep, for Libraries and
District Schools.
#/

"Mr. Headley's peculiarities as an author are universally known. He is one of the
most vigorous and spirit-stirring writers of the day, especially graphic and powerful in
narratives of exciting events. No one can fail to get from his descriptions most graphic,
vivid, and lasting impressions of the scenes of which he speaks."--<i>N. Y. Courier and
Enquirer.</i>[*** Complete sentence, so the period goes INSIDE the tags.]

"His descriptions are graphic, his history correct, and his summing up character scarcely
suffers by a comparison with similar pages in Tacitus."--<i>N. Y. Evening Post.</i>



25 Advertisements 125-12A                 Updated  2011/07/18




/*
A Catalogue
of the Books
Published by
Mr. John Long

[Illustration]

13 & 14 Norris Street
Haymarket, London

(Late of 6 Chandos Street, Strand)

March, 1903


Telegrams and Cables "Longing, London"
*/

[*** This was formatted just like a Title Page.]
[*** The next example shows the first page of]
[*** the "Catalogue."]



25 Advertisements 125-13A                 Updated  2011/07/23




New and Forthcoming Books

pages 2 to 8.[*** ignore the box, treat text like a heading,]

/*
<i>March, 1903</i>[*** right-justified, use No-wrap]
*/

MR. JOHN LONG'S

NEW AND FORTHCOMING BOOKS

For the SPRING and SUMMER 1903


<sc>New Novels by the Best Authors</sc>

Crown 8vo, cloth gilt, price <b>6s.</b> each

[*** In this example, each title is centered, on its own line,]
[*** and can be treated like a heading. The descriptions are  ]
[*** hanging indents, so mark each of them in Block Quotes.   ]
FUGITIVE ANNE

/#
By <sc>Mrs. Campbell Praed</sc>, Author of "Nadine," "Dwellers
by the River," etc.
#/

AN OUTSIDER'S YEAR

/#
By <sc>Florence Warden</sc>, Author of "The House on the
Marsh," "Something in the City," etc.
#/

CRIMSON LILIES

/#
By <sc>May Crommelin</sc>, Author of "A Daughter of England," "A
Woman-Derelict," etc.
#/


JOHN LONG, 13 & 14, Norris Street, Haymarket, London

And at all the Libraries and Booksellers



25 Advertisements 125-15A                 Updated  2011/07/16

[*** This Ad contains headings,                 ]
[*** wrappable text, a list, and non-wrappable  ]
[*** text. The next few examples show one       ]
[*** approach to formatting each segment of it. ]



25 Advertisements 125-15B                 Updated  2011/07/22

[*** The first part of this example contains headings and wrappable text.]




<sc>Helpful and Instructive Booklets.</sc>

PHILANTHROPISTS AND SOCIAL REFORMERS

Are invited to read and circulate the following publications.


"The Testimony of Science in Favour of Natural
and Humane Diet."

/*
By <sc>Sidney H. Beard</sc>.    <i>Seventh Edition.</i>

<i>One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth Thousand.</i>

<i>Price</i> 2d.[** all prices on page in sans serif] (2-1/2d. <i>post free</i>); 2s. <i>per dozen</i> (<i>post free</i>);
15s. <i>per hundred</i> (<i>post free</i>).

<i>French Edition</i>, 20 Centimes. <i>German Edition</i>, 20 Pfennigs.
*/

A handy up-to-date booklet, full of expert evidence by eminent authorities in
the Medical and Scientific world, athletic evidence and personal testimony of a
convincing character, with references for the quotations. Every Food Reformer
and Lecturer will need this booklet.



25 Advertisements 125-15C                 Updated  2011/07/19

[*** The second part of this example is a simple list.]

CONTENTS:

/*
Flesh-Eating an Unnatural Habit.
Flesh-Eating an Unnecessary Habit.
Flesh-Eating a Cause of Disease.
Uric Acid Maladies.
Appendicitis
Cancer.
Tuberculosis
The Sufficiency and Superiority of Fruitarian Diet.
Experimental Evidence.
Athletic Evidence.
Personal Testimony.
An Octogenarian's Experience
A Cloud of Witnesses.
Man's Diet in the Future
A Physician's Forecast.
Our Responsibilities and Opportunity.
*/



25 Advertisements 125-15D                 Updated  2011/07/28

[*** In the third part of this example, the "detail" lines are not wrappable. They need lots of in-line tags. ]
[*** Note that the abbreviations for "pence" (d.) are in a different (sans serif) font, but not italicized.   ]
[*** In this kind of situation, consider asking the Project Manager whether and how to mark it.               ]

"The Diet for Cultured People."

/*
By <sc>Dr. Josiah Oldfield</sc>, M.A., D.C.L., L.R.C.P., M.R.C.S.
<i>Third Edition.</i>      <i>Twentieth Thousand.</i>      <i>Price</i> 2d.[** sans serif] (2-1/2d. <i>post free</i>).
*/

"How to Avoid Appendicitis."

/*
By <sc>Dr. Josiah Oldfield</sc>, M.A., D.C.L., L.R.C.P., M.R.C.S.
<i>Tenth Thousand.</i>    <i>Price</i> 2d. (2-1/2d. <i>post free</i>).
*/

"The Cruelties of the Meat Trade."

/*
By <sc>Dr. Josiah Oldfield</sc>, M.A., D.C.L., L.R.C.P., M.R.C.S.
<i>Third Edition.</i>      <i>Twenty-Fifth Thousand.</i>      <i>Price</i> 1d. (1-1/2d. <i>post free</i>).
*/

Some eye-witness revelations of the cruelties of the Flesh Traffic.



25 Advertisements 125-15E                 Updated  2011/07/20

[*** The final part of this example is a continuation of the third part, but includes a paragraph of wrappable text.]
[*** It ends with the Publisher's contact information.]

"Errors in Eating and Physical Degeneration."

/*
By <sc>Sir William Earnshaw Cooper</sc>, C.I.E.
<i>Fifth Thousand.</i>    <i>In Art Linen.</i>    <i>Price</i> 6d.[** sans serif] (<i>post free</i>).
*/

An up-to-date book which reveals in a piquant and interesting manner the
many Dietetic mistakes and transgressions that are being made by the British
public, and the cost in suffering which they have to pay in consequence.
Much useful information is contained in this book, in addition to Tables of
Food Values, etc.


THE ORDER OF THE GOLDEN AGE,

153, 155, Brompton Road, London, S.W.



25 Advertisements 125-17A                 Updated  2011/07/23

[*** the "continued" is irrelevant in an eBook]
[*** These were longer, multi-part listings, and were separated by 2 blank lines.]


THE KING'S RACE-HORSES

A HISTORY OF THE CONNECTION OF HIS MAJESTY
KING EDWARD VII. WITH THE NATIONAL SPORT

By <sc>Edward Spencer</sc>, Author of "The Great Game," &c.

/#
Printed on Hand-made Paper, with Twenty Plates in Photogravure,
limited to 300 Copies. Royal 4to. Price £3 3s. net.

[**inverted asterism] <i>Also a Special Edition, Imperial 4to, on Japanese Vellum,
limited to 50 Copies, the Plates on India Paper, one hand
Coloured, with a Duplicate Set of Plates in handsome
Portfolio for Framing. Each Copy Numbered and signed
by the Author. Price £10 10s. net.</i>
#/

A four-page 4to Prospectus, giving a full description of the work, post free
from the leading Booksellers and Libraries, or from the Publisher.

<i>See</i> page 8 of this Catalogue.


RURAL LIFE: Its Humour and Pathos

By <sc>Caroline Gearey</sc>. Crown 8vo, special cover design, 6s.

<b>The Academy.</b>--"A pleasant 'pot-pourri' of observations and anecdotes
relating to village life. Well chosen and pleasantly knit together." <b>The
Daily News.</b>--"The book is amusing." <b>The Spectator.</b>--"A sufficiently
readable book." <b>To-day.</b>--"A pleasantly written book." <b>The Leeds
Mercury.</b>--"In her very entertaining book Miss Gearey is happy in her
illustrations of village courtship." <b>The Glasgow Herald.</b>--"The sketches
are as good-natured as they are entertaining."


THE HOUSE OF COMMONS

By the Right Hon. <sc>Sir Richard Temple</sc>, Bart., G.C.S.I., &c.

/*
Crown 8vo, cloth gilt, 3s. 6d.      [<i>Second Edition.</i>[** no end bracket]
*/

<b>The Daily News.</b>--"We heartily congratulate Sir Richard Temple on
producing a particularly pleasing book about Parliament."

<b>The Pall Mall Gazette.</b>--"Every Parliamentarian and every Politician will
find this book of deep interest."

<b>The Athenæum.</b>--"We can strongly recommend Sir Richard Temple's
book."

<b>The Globe.</b>--"A manual whose utility is equalled only by its brightness
and general readability."


JOHN LONG, 13 & 14 Norris Street, Haymarket, London

And at all the Libraries and Booksellers
[*** Keep publisher's information even though it's on every page.]



25 Advertisements 125-18A                 Updated  2011/07/17




Works of Robert W. Chambers


/*
The Streets of Ascalon
Blue-Bird Weather
Japonette
The Adventures of a Modest Man
The Danger Mark
Special Messenger
The Firing Line
The Younger Set
The Fighting Chance
Some Ladies in Haste
The Tree of Heaven
The Tracer of Lost Persons
A Young Man in a Hurry
Lorraine
Maids of Paradise
Ashes of Empire
The Red Republic
Outsiders
The Common Law
Ailsa Paige
The Green Mouse
Iole
The Reckoning
The Maid-at-Arms
Cardigan
The Haunts of Men
The Mystery of Choice
The Cambric Mask
The Maker of Moons
The King in Yellow
In Search of the Unknown
The Conspirators
A King and a Few Dukes
In the Quarter
*/


For Children

/*
Garden-Land
Forest-Land
River-Land
Mountain-Land
Orchard-Land
Outdoor-Land
Hide and Seek in Forest-Land
*/


D. APPLETON AND COMPANY, <sc>New York</sc>



25 Advertisements 125-19A                 Updated  2011/07/22




JUST HOW TO BEGIN

A Healthy Change of Diet

Easily and Comfortably,
Economically, Successfully,

Write to <sc>Eustace Miles</sc>, M.A., for

PERSONAL ADVICE.

If, when you write to him, you mention any difficulties
or ailments, mark the envelope "Private and Personal."
[** Is this where headings end?][*** unsure; left a note]


<i>JUST TWO HINTS.</i>[*** This is how we format underlining]

/*
<b>1.</b> Instead of meat, use Eustace Miles Proteid Food,
"EMPROTE," The Best Body-Building Food-Basis.[*** unwrapped]
(Price per 1-lb. tin, <b>1/10</b>.)

It is Ready for Use and Needs no Cooking.

<b>2.</b> When you are in London, have all your meals at the
*/


EUSTACE MILES RESTAURANT,

/*
<i>40, Chandos Street,
Charing Cross, W.C.</i>[*** again, underlining]
*/

[Illustration][**line drawings on both sides of address]



25 Advertisements 125-20A                 Updated  2011/07/23




[*** These 3 lines were left wrappable. If you think they should]
[*** remain separate, put blank lines between them.]
YOU
really should
secure at once a copy of our new and revised list,

"A Guide to Good Things."

It more than ever lives up to its title and should be in the hands,
not only of food reformers, but of all who appreciate 'good
things' at the lowest possible prices, and 'good service' in the
best and most modern sense of that phrase.

It includes a comprehensive list of 'Health Foods' by all the
leading manufacturers as well as the many popular items of our
own introduction, and contains in addition a budget of useful
information, recipes, &c.


Why not call to-day?

and take lunch or tea, amid palms and flowers, in our well-known
Saloons, the handsomest of their kind in London; see
the display of fruit and flowers on the ground floor, and visit
our Health Food Stores (next door but one). Be sure and ask
for a copy of our booklet.


If you cannot call

/*
let us have your name and address and we will gladly send you a
copy post free, or if you enclose a penny stamp we
will send in addition a Sample of
"FRUNUT." Write at
once to
*/


SHEARN'S,

THE WORLD'S LARGEST FRUITARIAN STORES,

231 & 234, TOTTENHAM COURT ROAD, W.,
AND BRANCHES.

Telephone:--Gen. 4907 and 6555.



25 Advertisements 125-21A                 Updated  2011/07/27




J. B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY'S

New and Forthcoming Books


Peg Along

/#
By GEORGE L. WALTON, M.D. 12mo. Cloth, $1.00 net.
#/

Dr. Walton's slogan, "Why Worry," swept the country.
His little book of that title did an infinite amount of good.
"Peg Along" is the 1915 slogan. Hundreds of thousands
of fussers, fretters, semi- and would-be invalids, and all
other halters by the wayside should be reached by
Dr. Walton's stirring encouragement to "peg along." In
this new book he shows us how to correct our missteps of
care, anxiety, fretting, fear, martyrism, over-insistence,
etc., by teaching us real steps in the chapters on work
and play, managing the mind, Franklin's and Bacon's
methods, etc., etc. Send copies of this inspiring little work
to friends who appreciate bright wisdom. Win them into
joyful, happy "peggers along" to health and happiness.


Under the Red Cross Flag[*** This is the title]

At Home and Abroad[*** This is the sub-title]

/#
By MABEL T. BOARDMAN, Chairman of the National Relief
Board, American Red Cross.

Foreword by PRESIDENT WOODROW WILSON.

Fully illustrated. Decorated cloth. Gilt top. $1.50 net.
#/

The American Red Cross and the name of Miss Boardman
have been inseparably connected for many years; her own
story is one of fascinating human interest to all who feel a
bond of sympathy with those who suffer. To-day it is
the European War, but in unforgotten yesterdays there
was the Philippine Typhoon, the Vesuvian Eruption, the
Chinese Famine, and almost countless other disasters
in which the heroes and heroines of the Red Cross have
worked and met danger in their effort to alleviate the
sufferings of humanity. This is the only complete historical
work upon the subject that has yet been written;
no one, accounting experience and literary ability, is
better fitted to present the facts than is the author.



25 Advertisements 125-23A                 Updated  2011/07/23

[*** The Proofers arranged this into two consecutive  ]
[*** columns, so just format the text that way.       ]
[*** Below is the left-hand column; the next example  ]
[*** is the right-hand one.                           ]




/*
I.
H.A.
HEALTH
FOODS

Are the very
Basis
of
Food
Reform.
*/

[Illustration]

They were the
pioneers of the
movement in
this country
and
STILL STAND
UNRIVALLED.



25 Advertisements 125-23B                 Updated  2011/07/17

[*** Continuation of previous example: right-hand column]

The following are a few of our Specialities:--


GRANOSE.

Acknowledged to be the most valuable family
food of its kind. Granose is wheat in the form
of crisp, delicate flakes, thoroughly cooked and
so rendered highly digestible. While it is given
to very young infants with great success it is
an all-round family food and is increasing in
popularity everywhere. Free Samples supplied
to <i>bona fide</i> inquirers.


PROTOSE.

A delicious substitute for meat guaranteed to
be free from all chemical impurities. Thoroughly
cooked, highly nutritious and digestible. Made
entirely from choice nuts and wheat.


AVENOLA.

Makes superior porridge in one minute: also
good as a basis for vegetarian "roasts."
Children are delighted with it for breakfast.
Very nourishing.


NUTTOLENE.

Without doubt the most delicate and tempting
substitute for meat pastes. Makes excellent
sandwiches and is capable of a variety of uses.


HEALTH COFFEE.

A wholesome beverage made entirely from
cereals. Should be used in the place of tea and
ordinary coffee.


I.H.A.
HEALTH BISCUITS.

The distinguishing feature of our biscuits is
that they are absolutely pure, nourishing, and
digestible. We make a variety combining
wholesomeness with palatability.


<i>For further particulars and price list write</i>:--

International Health
Association, Ltd.,

Stanborough Park, WATFORD, HERTS.



25 Advertisements 125-24A                 Updated  2011/07/16

[*** A two-part Ad. The formatted text is shown in the next ]
[*** example.                                               ]



25 Advertisements 125-24B                 Updated  2011/07/22




As Sweet as Nuts--More Nutritious than Beef.

HAVE U TRIED

"PITMAN"

NUTO CREAM MEAT

THE WHITE MEAT

In the new shape tin. Made from Nuts and Corn, at the
suggestion of <sc>Dr. Geo. Black</sc>, of Torquay, to provide a

<i>Delicate and White Meat free from
Condiments and Preservatives</i>[*** this is how we show underlining]

For Invalids, the Convalescent, and the Robust.

Per Tin--1/2-lb., <b>6d.</b>; 1-lb., <b>10-1/2d.</b>; 1-1/2-lb., <b>1/2</b>; 3-lb., <b>2/-</b>

TO TAKE THE PLACE OF POULTRY.


"Pitman" Nut Meat Brawn

is a delightful combination of "Pitman" Nut Meats (the
outcome of years of research to produce unique, delicately
flavoured, well-balanced and highly nutritious foods, each
a perfect substitute for flesh meat) and pure carefully
seasoned Vegetable Jelly, so blended to make an
appetising dish suitable

FOR THE HOT WEATHER.

Nothing could be nicer or more appreciated for picnics, etc.
With salad and Wholemeal bread and butter it provides a
portable, appetising and sufficing meal ready at a
moment's notice.

Per Tin, 1/2-lb. <b>6d.</b> 1-lb., <b>10-1/2d.</b> 1-1/2-lb. <b>1/2</b>

Ask your Stores for them, or

SEND FOR A SAMPLE 1/2-lb. TIN

of Meat or Brawn, post free 9d. The two for 1/4.

Orders of 5/- value carriage paid. Full Catalogue, post free 2 stamps,
with Diet Guide and copy of "Nuts, and all about them," 48 pages from


"PITMAN" HEALTH FOOD Co.,

153, Aston Brook Street, BIRMINGHAM.



25 Advertisements 125-25A                 Updated  2011/07/22




ABBOTSHOLME SCHOOL, Derbyshire

An
Up-to-date
Education
for Boys


Where a Scientific Non-flesh Diet is
supplied to pupils requiring same.

The School, founded in 1889, has attracted
attention throughout the world.

A broad and liberal foundation enables
the boy to discover for himself where his
especial bent lies. Specialisation follows at
a later and more responsible age, to prepare
for the Universities or other higher seats of
learning, with a view to an active career in
present day conditions. Outdoor recreations
over an estate of 133 acres. Fees £120 (and
upwards) per annum. Instead of prizes, Awards--based on each year's
work--to a maximum of £30 per annum, open to all boys. Among the
Members of the Advisory Council are the Duke of Devonshire, the
Duchess of Sutherland, Sir Henry Craik, and other prominent
educators of England, Germany and America.

For full particulars see Prospectus.


Head-Master - - <sc>Cecil Reddie</sc>, Fettes College,

B.Sc. (Edin.), Ph.D. (magna cum laude), Göttingen.




Cromer[*** new ad]
Guild
of
Handicraft

ALL KINDS OF [**2 inline leaf illustrations]

Metal Work, Enamelling,
Jewellery, Design,
Drawing, Sculpture.


PUPILS RECEIVED.

Director - Mr. H. H. STANSFIELD.

In connection with the above there is a

Food Reform Guest House at East Runton,

(1 mile from Cromer).

/*
GARDEN.    SEA BATHING.    TENNIS.
*/


FOR TERMS APPLY TO

Mrs. Stansfield, East Runton, Nr. Cromer, Norfolk.



25 Advertisements 125-26A                 Updated  2011/07/17

[*** This is a page of small Ads.  ]
[***                               ]
[*** The next page shows how a few ]
[*** of these Ads were formatted.  ]
[*** The others were done the same ]
[*** way.                          ]
[***                               ]
[*** The purpose of these examples ]
[*** is to show the spacing        ]
[*** patterns and the use of block ]
[*** markups, so even though       ]
[*** the text had to be very small ]
[*** to fit the screen, those      ]
[*** patterns should be clear.     ]



25 Advertisements 125-26B                 Updated  2011/07/22

[*** First paragraph continues information begun on previous page.]
[*** This is a page of small Ads, so just separate them with 2 blank lines.]

<sc>Notes and Queries</sc> <i>may be procured, by order, of all Booksellers
and Newsvenders. It is published at noon on Friday, so
that our country Subscribers ought not to experience any difficulty
in procuring it regularly. Many of the country Booksellers, &c.,
are, probably, not yet aware of this arrangement, which will
enable them to receive</i> <sc>Notes and Queries</sc> <i>in their Saturday
parcels.</i>

<i>All communications for the Editor of <sc>Notes and Queries</sc> should
be addressed to the care of</i> <sc>Mr. Bell</sc>, No. 186. Fleet Street.


This Day is Published,

THE QUARTERLY REVIEW, No. CLXXVII.

CONTENTS:

/*
   I. GARDENING.
  II. SCOTLAND BEFORE THE REFORMATION.
 III. TRAVELLERS IN NORTH AMERICA--ANNEXATION--FREE TRADE--SLAVERY.
  IV. DUKES OF URBINO.
   V. WALPOLE AND MASON[**.]
  VI. ORIGEN--THE EARLY PAPACY.
 VII. BADHAM'S EURIPIDES.
VIII. RUBRIC <i>versus</i> USAGE.
*/

[*** Within a small Ad, just use 1 blank line to separate the contact info,]
<sc>John Murray</sc>, Albemarle Street.
[*** and separate the small Ads with 2 blank lines.]


FOR EVERY CHILD IN THE KINGDOM.

On 1st July, 1851, Price 2<i>s.</i> 6<i>d.</i>, an Enduring Record, full of Interesting
Details--Vivid Descriptions--Moral Sentiments--and Beautiful Pictures,
entitled[*** above text cropped so example would be readable]

LITTLE HENRY'S HOLIDAY

AT

THE GREAT EXHIBITION,

By the Editor of "<sc>Pleasant Pages</sc>."

PLEASANT PAGES.--<sc>Double Numbers</sc> are
now publishing, containing a Course of "OBJECT LESSONS"
from the Great Exhibition.--Volume II. is just out. Third Edition of
Volume I. is now ready.

London: <sc>Houlston and Stoneman</sc>; and all Booksellers.



25 Advertisements 125-27A                 Updated  2011/07/22




/*[*** No-wrap used here to preserve spacing in 2nd line]
ARCHEVA (DIGESTIVE) RUSKS.
BRAND.              4 Gold Medals.
*/


Splendid for
CHILDREN, INVALIDS
and DYSPEPTICS.

[Illustration: ARCH - EVA]

[Illustration: RUSKS]

Recommended by the
Medical Faculty.

Free from Deleterious
Matter. No DRUGS
used.

Excellent at ALL
meals for
EVERYONE.

Palatable
and Nourishing.

A true
Health Food.

From all the leading Stores, Grocers, or Chemists.

/*
In 3 { SIZES OF TINS: 5, 10 and 24 packets, each 10 Rusks.
     { VARIETIES: Plain, Medium and Sweet.
*/


Send 3d. stamps for Samples and Booklet to

ARCHEVA RUSK Co. (Dept. L.),

93, Upper Thames Street, LONDON, E.C., England.
[*** (The bottom Ad is in the next example.)]



25 Advertisements 125-27B                 Updated  2011/07/21

[*** See previous example for the first Ad on this page]




WISE COOKS USE[*** Second Ad on same page. Both are large Ads, so use 4 blank lines above each of them.]
MARMITE

(THE PURE VEGETABLE EXTRACT).


/*
MARMITE is absolutely pure
Is an invaluable pick-me-up
Strengthens as well as stimulates
Is easily digested and economical
Is recommended by medical profession
Is used by Food-Reformers & Vegetarians everywhere
*/

<i>The Lancet</i> says: "This entirely vegetable Extract possesses the same
nutrient value as a well-prepared meat extract."

OBTAINABLE AT ALL HEALTH FOOD STORES.


<b>FREE SAMPLE</b> on receipt of penny stamp to pay postage by

Marmite Food Extract Co., Ltd.,

59, EASTCHEAP, LONDON, E.C.



25 Advertisements 125-28A                 Updated  2011/07/17




Quaker
City
Peanut
Butter
Mill

[Illustration]

Price of Mill $4.00


This mill is tinned and has a ball bearing. Grinds
dry, wet or oily substances. Weight ten pounds,
capacity five pounds peanut butter per hour. This
is not a cheap meat mill which will not grind fine,
but a thoroughly practical grinding mill constructed
on the same principles as our large mills, which
have been used so successfully throughout the world for
nearly a generation. It is a general grinding mill for family
use, and is sold at a price within the reach of every family.
The importance of pure food can not be overestimated. The
surest way to get it is to do your own grinding, thus
having the article freshly ground as you use it, and avoiding
the danger of injurious adulterations. This mill is adapted
to grinding or pulverizing any of the following articles:--

Coffee, peanuts or nuts of any kind, all wet or oily substances,
corn meal, cracker dust, bread crumbs, cracked wheat
and oats, horseradish, and cooked meats, spices, herbs, and
roots, vanilla beans and pods when mixed with sugar and
ground together for flavoring; raisins, with or without seeds
for marmalade, cocoanuts, etc. Peanut butter is said to be
superior to codliver oil for consumptives. Send for circular
containing directions for making peanut butter.


MANUFACTURED BY

The A. W. STRAUB CO., 3737-41 Filbert St.
Philadelphia, Pa.

Canal and Randolph Sts., Chicago, Ill.

<sc>Vegetarian Cafe, 755 Market St., San Francisco, Cal.</sc>



25 Advertisements 125-29A                 Updated  2011/07/22

[*** Another full-page Ad with 2 sections]




Vegetarian
Cooking Oil

[Illustration]

A Pure vegetable shortening,
made by a combination of the
best food oils so blended as to
give the delicate flavor of pure
olive oil. A superior salad oil, a
cheap, successful oil for all kinds of
shortening.

/*
1/2 gal. can, $0 75
10 gal. case, 11 50
*/


Grape Juice[*** second part of same Ad]
and Cider

[Illustration]

Our Grape Juice is made from the best California
grapes carefully selected, filtered, and put up by a
process that keeps the juice from fermenting.

Apple Cider is made from sound ripe apples cored,
washed and free from worms.

/*
Quarts $0 40    Pints $0 25    Apple Cider, quarts $0 35
*/


SANITARIUM FOOD COMPANY

Sanitarium, California

<sc>Branch Stores</sc>: San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose, Fresno, California;
And Salt Lake City and Provo, Utah.    [*** cropped to screen]



25 Advertisements 125-30A                 Updated  2015/01/11




<sc>Horlick's
Malted Milk</sc>

MALTED BARLEY, WHEAT, and MILK in Powder Form.

THE IDEAL FOOD DRINK
FOR ALL AGES.

Delicious, Nourishing, and Refreshing.


[Illustration: THE PACKAGE.]

HORLICK'S MALTED MILK

/#
¶ <b>IN THE HOME</b>, when used as a Table
Beverage is more beneficial than Tea,
Coffee, Chocolate or Cocoa.

¶ <b>IS ESPECIALLY USEFUL IN
PHYSICAL CULTURE</b> as it replaces
waste tissue and gives a feeling of fitness
and staying power.

[*** (removed 3 items to fit this example on the screen]
[*** ' ¶ ' is the standard symbol for "paragraph"]

¶ <b>FOR GROWING CHILDREN.</b> Builds
up and nourishes the constitution, gives
stamina and ensures healthy growth
with development.
#/

SERVED IN HOTELS, RESTAURANTS
and CAFÉS--HOT OR COLD.

Requires no Cooking.

Of all Chemists and Stores in Sterilised Glass Bottles, at 1/6, 2/6 & 11/-
[** numbers above may be bold, or just in different font]
[*** numbers cropped to fit rest of example on the screen]


<i>Liberal Sample for trial free by post on request.</i>

HORLICK'S MALTED MILK Co., SLOUGH, BUCKS,
ENGLAND.



25 Advertisements 125-31A                 Updated  2011/07/16

[*** Formatted text is shown in the next example. ]
[*** Basically, this is just a series of hanging  ]
[*** indents (which we enclose in a Block Quote), ]
[*** with a heading at the top, another heading   ]
[*** at the bottom of the main box, and three     ]
[*** small elements below the main box.  Also,    ]
[*** several in-line markups are needed.          ]



25 Advertisements 125-31B                 Updated  2011/07/23

[*** Full-size Image is shown in previous example.]




The Secret of
Perfect Health


/#
[**this 1st line is indented]lies very largely in right diet. Our foods are made from
the purest and finest materials under the most hygienic
conditions. They include:--

<b>NUT BUTTERS.</b> Most delicious. Food as well as fat. Much
safer and go farther than dairy butter. Almond, <b>1/3</b>; Walnut,
Coconut and Cashew, <b>1/</b>; Peanut, <b>9</b>d. per lb. The Almond Butter
is specially recommended.

<b>NUT CREAMS</b> are a delicacy for the healthy, and a delightful
food-remedy to the ailing. Absolutely pure. Almond, 1/2-lb., <b>1/-</b>;
Hazel, 1/2-lb., <b>1/-</b>; Coconut, 1/2-lb., <b>5</b>d.; Pine Kernel, 1-lb., <b>1/8</b>.

<b>NUT SOUPS</b>, made from Nut Cream and choice vegetables, are
extremely nutritious and an excellent nerve and blood tonic. Can
be served in a few minutes. In twelve varieties, <b>3</b>d. per drum.

<b>FRITTAMIX.</b> Very savoury and digestible--can be prepared for table
in a few minutes, requiring only the addition of water. Full
directions on each package. Per packet, <b>2-1/2</b>d.; 1-lb. packets, <b>9</b>d.;
3-lb. tins, <b>2/2</b>; 6-lb. tins, <b>4/-</b>. Four varieties--Piquant, Mild,
Walnut, Tomato.

<b>NUTTER.</b> Pure, white and tasteless. Free from water and preservatives.
Goes much farther and is much nicer and more wholesome
than ordinary butter. Ideal for frying. Makes most delicious
pastry and puddings. 1-1/2-lb. package, <b>1/-</b>; 3-lb. tins, <b>2/1</b>. Special
prices for large consumers.

<b>RECIPES</b> for the above and many other of our Specialities will be
found in our <i>Fruitarian Recipes</i>, full of delightful suggestions;
post free, <b>1-1/2</b>d.
#/


MAPLETON'S NUT FOOD CO., LTD.,
GARSTON, LIVERPOOL.

Ask for them at
your Stores.

<i>WRITE TO-DAY</i>[*** we use italics markups to represent underlining]

for a complete
list of wholesome
dainty Foods. We
welcome correspondence.

[Illustration:

/*
<sc>Mapleton's</sc>
NUT
FOODS
*/
]



25 Advertisements 125-32A                 Updated  2011/07/27




THE GOLDEN MEAN.


White flour is a clogging constipating food that paves the
way to appendicitis, etc. Coarse wholemeal irritates the
digestive tract and wastes the nourishment that should remain
in the body.

[Illustration:

/*
"ARTOX"
STONE
GROUND
*/
]

"ARTOX" Pure Wholemeal
is the Golden Mean.

It contains every atom of the wheat,
but so finely ground that it will not
irritate the most delicate digestion.
Its regular use acts like magic in
keeping the internal organs clear and
clean.

<sc>You can make everything</sc> with it, even sponge cakes, <sc>AND
IT MAKES EVERYTHING NICER</sc>.[*** A bit tricky: the beginning of]
[*** the sentence is in mixed-small caps, but the end is all-caps,]
[*** and the middle is normal text.]


Our Handsome Booklet[*** part of same Ad]

"Grains of Common Sense," will tell
you more about "ARTOX" and give
you recipes for a veritable banquet
of delight. <i>Send for a post free copy
now.</i>

"ARTOX" is sold by Health Food
Stores and Grocers, 3lb., 7lb., 14lb.
sealed linen bags; or 28lb, sent direct,
carriage paid, for 5s.


/*
APPLEYARDS, Ltd.

(Dept. O.)
ROTHERHAM.
*/

[Illustration: Grains of Common Sense]



25 Advertisements 125-33A                 Updated  2011/07/17




DRINK
DOLE'S
Pure Hawaiian
<i>PINEAPPLE
JUICE.</i>

[Illustration]


It is simply the expression of the <b>RIPE PINEAPPLE</b> without
the addition of sugar, water, preservatives, or any other thing.

It is preserved in bottles in its <b>FRESH STATE</b> by the most
delicate sterilizing process known to advanced science.

PURE as the DEW.

QUENCHES THIRST. CURES DIPHTHERIA.


<i>Send Post Card to</i>:--

C. HOWE PIPER & Co.,

Factors and Sole Distributors for The Hawaiian PINEAPPLE
Products Co., Ltd., of HONOLULU, & St. George's House, Eastcheap.

/*
Chief Office:--19, Devonshire Chambers,
               146, Bishopsgate, LONDON, E.C.
*/



25 Advertisements 125-34A                 Updated  2011/07/20




THE LIVING TEMPLE,

By Dr. J. H. KELLOGG, M.D.

(<i>Medical Director of the Battle Creek Sanitarium, Michigan, U.S.A.</i>)

<b>FULLY
ILLUSTRATED</b>,
including a
number of fine
coloured plates.

[Illustration]

568 pp.
Price
<b>Six
Shillings</b>
(post free).

This book must be seen to be appreciated, but the following
brief partial outlines of the most important chapters will
afford some idea of the helpful nature of the contents.


<b>The Miracle of Digestion.</b> The Organs of Digestion--Five Food Elements,
Five Digestive Organs--What the Saliva does--The Work of the
Gastric Juice--Other Uses of the Digestive Fluids.

<b>Dietetic Sins.</b> Eating for Disease--The Selection of Food--Cereal Foods
and Legumes, etc.--Erroneous Notions about Fruits--Predigested Food
Elements in Fruits--Fruit Juices Destroy Germs--The Medicinal Use of Fruits--Fruit
Soup--Fruit Cure for Constipation--The Fruit Diet--Fruit a Cleansing
Food--Diseases Due to Milk--Milk and Cream from Nuts--Eggs.

<b>The Natural Way in Diet.</b> Why Fats Render Food Indigestible--Objectionable
Vegetable Fats--Chemical Bread Raisers--Condiments the Cause
of Gin Liver--Dextrinised Cereals--The Daily Ration--Balanced Bills of Fare--Too
Frequent Eating--The Purest Water, etc.

<b>What to do in case of Sudden Illness or Accident.</b> Fainting--Hemorrhage
of the Lungs--Hemorrhage from the Stomach--A Bruise--The
Dressing of Wounds--Sprains, etc.

<b>The Breath of Life.</b> Proper Breathing--The Rate at which Air is
Needed--Cultivating Lung Capacity--Why we Breathe when asleep, etc.

<b>The Brain and the Nerves.</b> Feeling Cells and Working Cells--How
Habits are Formed--The Proper Function of the Sense of Taste--How to have
a Good Memory--Recent Interesting Discoveries about Nerve Cells--Insomnia--Nerve
Poisons--A Common Cause of Nerve Exhaustion--How to Have a Clear
Head--The Problem of Heredity--Rational Mind Cure.


THE ORDER OF THE GOLDEN AGE

153, 155, Brompton Road, London, S.W.



25 Advertisements 125-35A                 Updated  2011/07/22




SIR WALTER SCOTT'S WORKS AND
LIFE,

<i>In Complete Uniform Sets</i>.
[*** A full-page Ad with several     ]
[*** elements. You can tell it's a   ]
[*** full-page Ad by the "contact    ]
[*** information" at the bottom:     ]
[*** it applies to the whole page.   ]
[***                                 ]
[*** The formatting for some of this ]
[*** is shown in the next examples.  ]
[*** Some of them are very small, to ]
[*** let you see the pattern of how  ]
[*** the text was organized, even if ]
[*** the words are hard (OK,         ]
[*** impossible) to read.            ]
[***                                 ]
[*** Since it's all one Ad, the      ]
[*** listings within it were         ]
[*** separated by 2 blank lines.     ]



25 Advertisements 125-35B                 Updated  2011/07/19

[*** See the "A" example for the full page. Next example shows this in Plain Text.]


1. THE ABBOTSFORD ILLUSTRATED
EDITION.

In 17 vols. super-royal 8vo. with upwards of 2,000 Illustrations on Wood
and Steel, 14<i>l.</i> 2<i>s.</i> 6<i>d.</i>

[**inverted asterism?] This Edition of the WAVERLEY NOVELS cost upwards of
40,000<i>l.</i>  Of Steel Engravings alone there are 120, after Drawings by
STANFIELD, ROBERTS, SIR DAVID WILKIE, LEITCH, CRESWICK,
M'CULLOCH, and other distinguished Artists. Of Engravings
on Wood there are nearly 2,000, all of them engraved with scrupulous
regard to accuracy of drawing and beauty of finish, and many of them,
by their characteristic expression and spirit of execution, imparting an
additional interest to the text which they illustrate.

/*
                   ARRANGEMENT.
NOVELS               12 vols.                     £10   0   0
POETRY                1  vol.                       0  18   0
PROSE                 2  vols. at 18<i>s.</i> 0<i>d.</i>}     2   6   6
  Ditto               1  vol.  at 10<i>s.</i> 6<i>d.</i>}
LIFE                  1  vol.                       0  18   0
                     --                           -----------
                     17  vols.                    £14   2   6
*/

2. THE CABINET LIBRARY EDITION.

In 98 vols. fcap. 8vo. with 200 Steel Engravings, 14<i>l.</i> 14<i>s.</i> 0<i>d.</i>

/*
                   ARRANGEMENT.
NOVELS               48 vols. at 3<i>s.</i>             £7   4   0
POETRY               12 vols. at 3<i>s.</i>              1  16   0
PROSE                28 vols. at 3<i>s.</i>              4   4   0
LIFE                 10 vols. at 3<i>s.</i>              1  10   0
                     --                           -----------
                     98 vols.                     £14  14   0
*/

[*** #3 omitted to fit example on the screen]
4. THE CABINET EDITION.

In 49 vols. fcap. 8vo. with numerous Illustrations, 9<i>l.</i> 6<i>s.</i> 0<i>d.</i>

/*
                   ARRANGEMENT.
NOVELS               25 vols. at 4<i>s.</i>             £5   0   0
POETRY                6 vols. at 4<i>s.</i>              1   4   0
PROSE                 8 vols. at 4<i>s.</i>              1  12   0
LIFE                 10 vols. at 3<i>s.</i>              1  10   0
                     --                           -----------
                     49 vols.                      £9   6   0
*/

/#
This Edition is rendered complete by adopting the following
volumes (of similar size) from the CABINET
LIBRARY EDITION, viz.:--
#/

/*
MINSTRELSY              4 vols. at 3<i>s.</i>            0  12   0
PROSE                  14 vols. at 3<i>s.</i>            2   2   0
                       --                         -----------
                       67                         £12   0   0
*/



25 Advertisements 125-35C                 Updated  2011/07/22

[*** The in-line tags of the previous example will look like this in Plain Text.]


1. THE ABBOTSFORD ILLUSTRATED
EDITION.

In 17 vols. super-royal 8vo. with upwards of 2,000 Illustrations on Wood
and Steel, 14_l._ 2_s._ 6_d._

[**inverted asterism?] This Edition of the WAVERLEY NOVELS cost upwards of
40,000_l._  Of Steel Engravings alone there are 120, after Drawings by
STANFIELD, ROBERTS, SIR DAVID WILKIE, LEITCH, CRESWICK,
M'CULLOCH, and other distinguished Artists. Of Engravings
on Wood there are nearly 2,000, all of them engraved with scrupulous
regard to accuracy of drawing and beauty of finish, and many of them,
by their characteristic expression and spirit of execution, imparting an
additional interest to the text which they illustrate.

/*
                   ARRANGEMENT.
NOVELS               12 vols.                     £10   0   0
POETRY                1  vol.                       0  18   0
PROSE                 2  vols. at 18_s._ 0_d._}     2   6   6
  Ditto               1  vol.  at 10_s._ 6_d._}
LIFE                  1  vol.                       0  18   0
                     --                           -----------
                     17  vols.                    £14   2   6
*/

2. THE CABINET LIBRARY EDITION.

In 98 vols. fcap. 8vo. with 200 Steel Engravings, 14_l._ 14_s._ 0_d._

/*
                   ARRANGEMENT.
NOVELS               48 vols. at 3_s._             £7   4   0
POETRY               12 vols. at 3_s._              1  16   0
PROSE                28 vols. at 3_s._              4   4   0
LIFE                 10 vols. at 3_s._              1  10   0
                     --                           -----------
                     98 vols.                     £14  14   0
*/

[*** #3 omitted to fit example on the screen]
4. THE CABINET EDITION.

In 49 vols. fcap. 8vo. with numerous Illustrations, 9_l._ 6_s._ 0_d._

/*
                   ARRANGEMENT.
NOVELS               25 vols. at 4_s._             £5   0   0
POETRY                6 vols. at 4_s._              1   4   0
PROSE                 8 vols. at 4_s._              1  12   0
LIFE                 10 vols. at 3_s._              1  10   0
                     --                           -----------
                     49 vols.                      £9   6   0
*/

/#
This Edition is rendered complete by adopting the following
volumes (of similar size) from the CABINET
LIBRARY EDITION, viz.:--
#/

/*
MINSTRELSY              4 vols. at 3_s._            0  12   0
PROSE                  14 vols. at 3_s._            2   2   0
                       --                         -----------
                       67                         £12   0   0
*/



25 Advertisements 125-35D                 Updated  2011/07/17

[*** See example "A" for the full page]


In a thick and closely-printed volume, price 16<i>s.</i>  The <sc>Fourth Edition</sc>
of the

WEALTH OF NATIONS.

By ADAM SMITH, LL.D.

With a Life of the Author, Notes, and Supplemental Dissertations,
by J. R. M'CULLOCH, Esq. This edition contains elaborate Notes
on our <sc>Monetary System</sc>, the <sc>Repeal</sc> of the <sc>Corn</sc> and <sc>Navigation
Laws</sc>, our <sc>Colonial Policy</sc>, &c.  The <sc>Index</sc> extends to fifty closely-printed
pages, affording facilities in the consultation of the work which
no other edition possesses to nearly so great an extent.

"Adam Smith's errors, when he fell into any, are corrected; most of
the improvements made in his science since his time are recorded; and
the work is not only adapted to our age, but is a history of past
aberrations, and of the progress towards truth.  Mr. M'Culloch's great
attainments are too well known to make any work he publishes require
any other notice or recommendation than such a brief description as we
have now given of the contents of this."--<i>Economist.</i>



25 Advertisements 125-35E                 Updated  2011/07/23

[*** See example "A" for the full-page image.]


In a thick vol. 8vo., double columns, price 12<i>s.</i>, the <sc>Ninth Edition</sc>,
enlarged, corrected and improved, of

A DICTIONARY OF
MEDICINE FOR POPULAR USE.

Containing an Account of Diseases and their Treatment, including those
most frequent in Warm Climates; with Directions for Administering
Medicines; the Regulation of Diet and Regimen; and the Management
of the Diseases of Women and Children.  By ALEXANDER MACAULAY,
M.D., Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh,
and Physician Accoucheur to the New Town Dispensary.

"Just such a work as every head of a family ought to have on his
book-shelf."--<i>Brighton Herald.</i>[*** Complete sentence, period goes INSIDE.]

"If sterling merit might be the passport to success, this work will
obtain the most extensive celebrity."--<i>Bath Herald.</i>

"Calculated to accomplish all that could be wished in a Popular
System of Medicine."--<i>Edinburgh Medical and Surgical Journal.</i>

"We have seen nothing of the kind better adapted for consultation."--<i>Literary
Gazette.</i>


ADAM & CHARLES BLACK, Edinburgh; LONGMAN & CO., SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, & CO.,
WHITTAKER & CO., and HAMILTON, ADAMS, & CO., London.



25 Advertisements 125-37A                 Updated  2011/07/22

[*** This is the top of page 4 of a multi-page list of books from one publisher. The authors' names are headings,    ]
[*** and on lines of their own, either of which means we don't mark them as bold.  Preceding them with 2 blank lines ]
[*** makes it easy for the Post-Processor to see how the page was organized.  Enclose each list in no-wrap, leave at ]
[*** least 6 spaces before the price information to show they are right-justified.                                   ]


Edmund Kirke's Works.

/*
AMONG THE PINES               $1 50
MY SOUTHERN FRIENDS            1 50
DOWN IN TENNESSEE              1 50
ADRIFT IN  DIXIE               1 50
AMONG THE GUERILLAS            1 50
*/


Dr. Cumming's Works.

/*
THE GREAT TRIBULATION         $2 00
THE GREAT PREPARATION          2 00
THE GREAT CONSUMMATION         2 00
TEACH US TO PRAY               2 00
LAST WARNING CRY               2 00
THE SEVENTH VIAL               2 00
*/


Stephe Smith.

/*[*** no-wrap needed to make the "6-spaces" right-justification signal work; no reason to mark the font change.]
ROMANCE AND HUMOR OF THE RAILROAD.--Illustrated      $1 50
*/



25 Advertisements 125-38A                 Updated  2011/07/21

[*** A page from American Missionary, with    ]
[*** five small Ads.  The next three examples ]
[*** show how they're formatted.              ]
[***                                          ]
[*** The Project Comments say that a thought  ]
[*** break should be used wherever there is a ]
[*** horizontal line, so that's how these Ads ]
[*** have been separated.  The "Webster" Ad   ]
[*** has small (hard to see here) horizontal  ]
[*** lines within it, and The Project Manager ]
[*** wanted those to be represented by        ]
[*** Thought Breaks, too.  Normally, we would ]
[*** just use two blank lines between these   ]
[*** Ads, but a Project's Comments or answers ]
[*** from the Project Manager, Post-Processor,]
[*** or a Project Facilitator supersede all   ]
[*** other Guidelines.                        ]



25 Advertisements 125-38B                 Updated  2013/05/27

<tb>[**implied--F2]
[*** Project Comments specified thought breaks for all horizontal lines.]

JAMES McCREERY & CO.

<sc>Previous to opening their new stock
of Fall Dress Goods, offer the following
bargains:</sc>[*** Colon INSIDE because it's in the middle of 2 small-cap paragraphs]

<sc>One line of Mixed Suitings, 44
inches wide, at 75 cts.; former price,
$1.25 per yard.</sc>[*** mark each paragraph separately]

<sc>One line of French Canvas Cloths,
50 cts.; former price $1.00 per yard.
Both of the above lines are all
wool and very desirable.</sc>

<sc>Orders by mail will receive prompt
and careful attention.</sc>

BROADWAY and ELEVENTH ST.,

NEW YORK.

<tb>[*** Separation between Ads conform to this Project's Comments]

INDELIBLE

Mark your
Clothing!
Clear Record
of
half a
Century.

"Most Reliable and Simplest
for plain or decorative
marking."
Use a
common
pen.

[Illustration: PAYSON'S
INDELIBLE INK,
for Marking Linen, Silk & Cotton
WITH A COMMON PEN.
Without a Preparation.]

Sold by all Druggists, Stationers,
News and Fancy Goods dealers.

PAYSON'S
Indelible Ink!



25 Advertisements 125-38C                 Updated  2013/05/27

<tb>[*** The right-hand column of Ads from American Missionary, which wants tb's]

[Illustration: INTERNATIONAL
SONG SERVICE

BY PHILIP PHILLIPS & HIS SON

WITH GEMS OF SONGS FROM
50 AUTHORS

LATEST, CHEAPEST AND BEST]

160 Pages. Strong Board Covers.

/*
30 cents each, postpaid.      $25.00 per 100.
*/

SEND TO

THE PHILLIPS PUBLISHING CO.,

Bible House, New York.

<tb>[*** Separation between Ads conform to this Project's Comments]

Reliable Carpenter Organs[*** Heading, so it isn't boldface; and it's in sans serif]

FOR
CHURCH <i>and</i>
CHAPEL.

[Illustration]

The Carpenter Organs
contain the celebrated
CARPENTER ORGAN
ACTION. They are
pure in tone, perfect in
construction, in exact
accord with the voice,
and full of patented
improvements. More
than 50 different styles,
ranging in price from $20 up. "Mr. Carpenter builds
most emphatically AN HONEST ORGAN."--<i>Youth's Companion.</i>
All organs of our manufacture warranted for
8 years. Special inducements to ministers and churches.
Catalogue free. <sc>E. P. Carpenter Co.</sc>, Brattleboro, Vt.

[*** The "Webster's" Ad is shown in the next example.]



25 Advertisements 125-38D                 Updated  2011/07/22

[*** The "Webster's" Ad at the bottom of American Missionary]

<tb>[*** Project Comments want this for EVERY horizontal line]

WEBSTER'S

Unabridged Dictionary.

<tb>

/*[*** If you think this is wrappable, omit the no-wrap tags.]
A DICTIONARY,[*** not Bold, just a font change.]
118,000 Words, 3000 Engravings, a
GAZETTEER OF THE WORLD,
of 25,000 Titles, and a
BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY,
of nearly 10,000 Noted Persons,
ALL IN ONE BOOK.
*/

<tb>

Invaluable
in every
School and
at every
Fireside.

<tb>

Contains 3000 more Words and nearly 2000 more
Illustrations than any other American Dictionary.

<tb>

<b>G. & C. MERRIAM & CO.</b>, Pub'rs, Springfield, Mass.
[*** boldface and regular weight on same line.]
[*** "Mass." isn't boldface, just too much ink, which also]
[*** occurred at the end of the line above it.]



26 Periodicals 126-01A                 Updated  2014/02/24




/*
BLACKWOOD'S
EDINBURGH MAGAZINE.

<sc>No. CCCCII.</sc>      APRIL, 1849.      <sc>Vol. LXV.</sc>[*** Separate the segments with 6 spaces.      ]
*/




MACAULAY'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND.


The historical and critical essay is
a species of literary composition which
has arisen, and been brought to perfection,
[*** OVERVIEW OF MAGAZINES AND OTHER PERIODICALS                                                             ]
[*** Formatting Periodicals is mostly like formatting anything else. These examples will show some of the    ]
[*** special situations that are common in these kinds of projects. Also, there are "UberProject" discussion ]
[*** threads for some periodicals: look for them under "Projects" in DP's main Forum.                        ]
[***                                                                                                         ]
[*** The Masthead is a Major Division, preceded by 4 blank lines. Usually, it's followed by an article,      ]
[*** editorial, or Table of Contents, each of which also is a Major Division, preceded by 4 blank lines and  ]
[*** followed by 2 blank lines, as shown in this example.                                                    ]
[*** Mastheads often contain a 2- or 3-part issue identification. Enclose such lines in no-wraps and         ]
[*** separate each of the segments by 6 spaces. If the publication's title requires more than one line,      ]
[*** include it in the same no-wraps. As with other "headings," separate the components with one blank line. ]
[***                                                                                                         ]
[*** "Credit" lines sometimes appear at the bottom of the first page of an article. They look like, and are  ]
[*** formatted as footnotes. When they don't have anchors in the text, leave a [**note].                     ]
[***                                                                                                         ]
[*** Some articles are serialized, with a few chapters in each issue. The articles are Major Divisions       ]
[*** (4 blank lines above the heading, 2 blank lines below), but headings within an article are formatted as ]
[*** Sections, even if they contain the word "Chapter", preceded by 2 blank lines and followed by 1 blank    ]
[*** line. (Treating such "Chapter" headings as actual chapters is a common error.)                          ]



26 Periodicals 126-02A                 Updated  2014/03/11




<sc>Scribner's Magazine</sc>

/*
VOL. XXVI      SEPTEMBER, 1899      NO. 3[*** Separate the three segments with 6 spaces and enclose the line in no-wraps ]
*/                                       [*** to preserve those spaces during post-processing.                           ]




WHERE THE WATER RUNS BOTH WAYS

By Frederic Irland

<sc>Illustrations from Photographs by the Author</sc>


[Illustration]

The greatest glory of Canada
is not its modern progress, but
[*** most of the page omitted to save space]

At Mattawa I procured the supplies
which are necessary for a canoe trip in
the woods, and the branch railroad took

[Footnote: Copyright, 1899, by Charles Scribner's Sons. All rights reserved.][**F2:unanchored footnote]
[*** The "Credit" line in this example is the Copyright, and we need to do something to separate it from the article. A  ]
[*** Block Quote won't do that, so some Project Managers request that we format this sort of information as a footnote,  ]
[*** even though it isn't referenced in the text, and mention the lack of an anchor in a [**note]. If the Project        ]
[*** comments don't address it, ASK for guidance; if none is forthcoming, use this method or the one in the next         ]
[*** example, which shows an alternative way of handling similar bottom-of-page information when a natural separation    ]
[*** exists on the page.                                                                                                 ]
[***                                                                                                                     ]
[*** The Masthead and the first article below it both are Major Divisions, so precede each with 4 blank lines and follow ]
[*** the article's heading information with 2 blank lines.                                                               ]



26 Periodicals 126-03A                 Updated  2014/03/11

/*

Battle between a Rat and Crab,                  184

Blue Beard and his Castle,                      188

A Horse stung to death,                          "

The Flowers of Spring,                           "

Boisterous Preaching,                            "

Letter to Peter Parley,                         189

Peter Parley's answer,                           "

The Lily. <i>A Song</i>,                               191
*/


Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1844, by <sc>S. G. Goodrich</sc>, in the Clerk's
Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.
[*** The position and purpose of the notice are similar to the previous example, but the material above it is ]
[*** enclosed in no-wraps, so the notice already is separated from the other text, and leaving 2 blank lines, ]
[*** or even 1 blank line, is sufficient.  In either of these similar cases, if the Project Manager did not   ]
[*** specify a preference, ASK for guidance; if no reply is forthcoming, use your best judgement as to which  ]
[*** of these methods will suffice.                                                                           ]



26 Periodicals 126-04A                 Updated  2014/02/24




THE CAXTONS.--PART XII.[*** Article title. Major Division.                         ]


CHAPTER LIX.[*** Section heading within the article, *NOT* a Major Division.       ]

The Hegira is completed--we have
all taken roost in the old tower. My
father's books have arrived by the
[*** The Major Divisions of a periodical are articles, editorials, letters to the  ]
[*** editor, the Contents, etc. As with any Major Division, we precede their       ]
[*** headings with 4 blank lines and follow them with 2 blank lines. Any headings  ]
[*** within them, including headings containing the word "Chapter", are just       ]
[*** Section headings, preceded by 2 blank lines and followed by 1 blank line.     ]
[***                                                                               ]
[*** "The Caxtons" is serialized, and each "PART" may contain several "Chapters",  ]
[*** but they're only chapters of that serial, not chapters of the magazine.       ]
[*** The next example is taken from 2 pages later in the same project, and         ]
[*** contains the heading for "CHAPTER LX."  As you will see in that example, it's ]
[*** formatted as a Section, not as a Chapter. Treating such headings as Major     ]
[*** Divisions is a common error.                                                  ]



26 Periodicals 126-05A                 Updated  2014/02/23

Verily, I know not how my father
[*** text omitted to save space)]
for everything else--down, with your
dust!"


CHAPTER LX.[*** Section heading within the article "The Caxtons.--Part XII." ]

Nothing has been heard of Uncle
Jack. When we moved to the tower,
[*** The article is a Major Division of this issue of this periodical.       ]
[*** "CHAPTER LX." is *NOT* a Major Division in this issue; it's just a      ]
[*** Section in this article, so we precede it with 2 blank lines and follow ]
[*** it with 1 blank line. The article began 2 pages earlier and that page   ]
[*** was shown in the previous example.                                      ]



26 Periodicals 126-06A                 Updated  2014/02/24

this minute and read it for him." Grandma
fumbled for her spectacles, and went off smiling.

"There!" said Rollo, "I had a feeling it was
Grandpa, all the time. Just think of Grandma
calling him 'a horrid, awful boy!'"

/*
<sc>Pansy.</sc>
*/
[*** Unless the Project Comments ask for something different, move attributions, signatures, ]
[*** etc., to lines of their own, left-justified and separated from the article or poem by a ]
[*** blank line.                                                                             ]
[***                                                                                         ]
[*** If they were more-or-less right-justified, enclose them in no-wraps (as shown here).    ]
[***                                                                                         ]
[*** Exception: don't move them when they are connected to adjacent text by an emdash, as    ]
[*** shown in a later example.                                                               ]



26 Periodicals 126-07A                 Updated  2014/02/24




POEM FOR RECITATION.[*** This probably is a Major Division; there was no Table of Contents.    ]

THE TWO GREAT CITIES.


/*
Side by side the two great cities,
  Afar on the traveller's sight.
One, black with the dust of labor,
[*** most of poem omitted to save space]
They know not the tomb from the palace,
  They dream not they ever have died;
God be thanked, they <i>never will</i> know it,
  Till they live, on the other side!
*/

/*
<sc>Samuel Miller Hageman.</sc>
*/
[*** Left-justify an attribution on its own line, separated from the poem by a blank line (the ]
[*** attribution isn't part of the last stanza). It was right-justified, so it should be in    ]
[*** no-wraps. Some projects' Comments specify that attributes should be in separate no-wraps  ]
[*** from the poem; others may specify that they should be in the same ones. If no preference  ]
[*** is given, you may do it either way, but for the sake of consistency within the project,   ]
[*** ASK for guidance in the project Discussion and state which way you are doing it (so       ]
[*** others may follow your lead). If a later reply asks for them to be done the "other" way,  ]
[*** please consider revising your pages.                                                      ]



26 Periodicals 126-08A                 Updated  2014/02/25

/*[*** This is the last stanza of a poem.]

Well, we laughed, and we laughed, till tears came in our eyes,[*** unwrap continuation line ]
At how little Fred did the engine chastise,
Until over his face came a flush of bright red.
"You are right; he won't scare us again," papa said.[*** unwrap continuation line           ]

<sc>Paranete.</sc>[*** "Complete sentence," so period goes inside the tags.                 ]
*/
[*** Move the attribution to a line of its own, left-justified,  ]
[*** preceded by a blank line, and in no-wraps (because it was   ]
[*** right-justified).                                           ]
[***                                                             ]
[*** Some project Comments will ask for attributions to be in    ]
[*** the same no-wraps as the poem (as shown here); others may   ]
[*** ask for them to be in separate no-wraps (as shown earlier). ]
[*** And some may have other specifications, all of which        ]
[*** supersede anything in these examples. If in doubt, it's     ]
[*** always appropriate to ASK in the Project Discussion.        ]
[***                                                             ]
[*** Also remember to use appropriate in-line markups, when      ]
[*** needed: this name is in small-caps.                         ]



26 Periodicals 126-09A                 Updated  2014/02/25

How the ship soon rode into the harbor and
dropped her strong anchor into the water to
hold her fast, and how the soldiers and sailors
and Sir John came on land, and what he did
and said and what his happy wife, Jane, did, and
how handsome she looked I can't tell you.

But there's another part I will tell you next
time.

/*
C. M. L.[*** preserve spaces between initials, if they were printed that way ]
*/
[*** Move the attribution to a line of its own, left-justified, and       ]
[*** separated from the main text of the article by a blank line. Since   ]
[*** it was right-justified in the image, enclose it in no-wraps.         ]
[***                                                                      ]
[*** If the article is in Block Quotes, the attribution, including the    ]
[*** no-wraps, should be within the same Block Quotes (there were no      ]
[*** Block Quotes here).                                                  ]
[***                                                                      ]
[*** Attributions may take the form of names, initials, or nicknames;     ]
[*** all of them should be moved as described here, unless the Project    ]
[*** Comments specify a different method.                                 ]
[*** Note that those initials are full-height; they're not in small-caps. ]



26 Periodicals 126-10A                 Updated  2014/02/24

time to save father trouble. Father wouldn't
take two hundred dollars for the horse to-day.
He eats anything you give him. Sis very often
brings out some of her dinner to him."

"He likes to eat out of a plate," said Dove;
"it makes him think he's folks."--<i>Golden Censer.</i>
[*** The guidance so far has been to move attributions to lines of their own.  ]
[*** However, the Proofreading Guidelines tell us to not split text at dashes  ]
[*** or emdashes, and that takes precedence over the guidance here. Leave the  ]
[*** emash and the attribution as they appeared in the image.                  ]
[***                                                                           ]
[*** Remember to use appropriate in-line tagging on the attribution: this one  ]
[*** is in italics, but they're more often in small-caps.                      ]
[***                                                                           ]
[*** The emdash is not part of the name and should not be in italics (or in    ]
[*** small-caps, if that was the formatting).  The attribution is a "complete  ]
[*** sentence" (the preceding text ended with a period), so the period after   ]
[*** the attribution goes INSIDE the closing small-caps tag.                   ]