Authors' Birthdays/February

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Contents:
1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th
16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st 22nd 23rd 24th 25th 26th 27th 28th 29th


1st

  • Hugo von Hofmannsthal (1874–1929), Austrian poet, dramatist, and essayist, whose plays, including Elektra (1903) and Der Rosenkavalier (1911), are best known as texts for Richard Strauss operas
  • Yevgeny Zamyatin (1884-1937), Russian author, known for his future-dystopian novel We
  • Charles Nordhoff (1887-1947), American novelist and traveler, best known for The Mutiny on the Bounty
  • Denise Robbins (1897), London romantic novelist; African-American poet and translator, born Missouri
  • (James Mercer) Langston Hughes, leading figure of the Harlem Renaissance (1902-1967)
  • S. J. Perleman (1904), humour essayist and screenplay writer
  • Muriel Spark (1918), Scottish novelist
  • Galway Kinnell (1927), Rhode Island-born poet and 1983 Pulitzer prize winner (poem "The Correspondence School Instructor...")
  • Reynolds Price (1933), North Carolina-born novelist, wrote Kate Vaiden
  • Jerry Spinelli (1941), Newbery-award-winning children's author


2nd

  • Hannah Moore (1745), popular English novelist
  • Hamid Abdulhak (1852–1937), Turkish romantic poet and playwright
  • (Henry) Havelock Ellis (1859-1939)
  • Joseph Seamon Cotter, Sr. (1861– 1949), Kentucky-born poet, dramatist, and short story writer, best known for Caleb, the Degenerate (1901), one of the earliest dramas by an African-American writer
  • Christian Gauss (1878), educator, writer, Princeton dean
  • James (Augustine) Joyce (1882–1941), Irish novelist, poet, and stream-of-consciousness pioneer, author of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1914), Ulysses (1922) (which was banned in the U.S until a court decision in its favour in 1933), and Finnegan's Wake (1939)
  • Rebecca Caudill (1899–1985)
  • Ayn Rand (1905), Russian-born novelist
  • Bernardas Brazdzionis (1907), Lithuanian poet, editor, and critic (5 Brazdzionis poems)
  • James Dickey (1923–1997), poet and Deliverance novelist
  • Judith Viorst (1931), New Jersey native, poet and children's author
  • Betsy Duffey (1953)
  • Eve Rice (1951)
  • Mary Casanova (1957)

3rd

  • Horace Greeley (1811 – 29 Nov 1872): New Hampshire-born editor, founder of the New York Tribune; Project Gutenberg; NNDB
  • Walter Bagehot (1826 – 1877): English economist and journalist, whose father-inlaw was the founder of the Economist, which Bagehot edited from 1860 until his death
  • Sidney Lanier (1842 – 1881): Georgia-born musician, poet, and critic
  • Gertrude Stein (1874 – 1946): Pittsburgh native, longtime Paris resident, avant-garde writer
  • Clarence Edward Mulford (1883 - 10 May 1956): Illinois western writer, wrote Hopalong Cassidy novels; Project Gutenberg;NNDB
  • James A. Michener (1907 - 16 Oct 1997): NNDB
  • Walt Morey (1907 – 1992)
  • Simone Weil (1909), French essayist, philosopher, and fighter for the Resistance
  • Lao She
  • Joan Lowery Nixon (1927 - 2003)
  • John Wallner (1945)

4th

  • Pierre De Marivaux (1688), French writer
  • George Lillo (1693), English dramatist
  • Jacques Prevert (1900), French poet and screenwriter "Les enfants qui s'aiment"
  • MacKinlay Kantor (1904), Iowa-born writer of Andersonville, 1956 Pulitzer prize winner;
  • (Mattheus) Uys Krige (1910–1987), South African playwright and novelist [site in French];
  • Betty Friedan (1921), Illinois-born feminist writer
  • Russell Hoban (1926)
  • Barbara Shook Hazen (1930)
  • Pat Ross (1943)
  • Robert Coover (1948), novelist and Brown University professor
  • Carl Michael Bellman
  • Georg Brandes
  • William Harrison Ainsworth (1805 – 3 Jan. 1882)

5th

  • Mona Kerby (1951)
  • Patricia Lauber (1924)
  • Joan Elma Rahn (1929)
  • David Wiesner (1956)
  • Marie Sevigne (1626), French letter-writer
  • Johan Ludvig Runeberg (1804), Finnish poet
  • Joris Karl Huysmans (1848–1907), French novelist, born Charles Marie Georges Huysmans, who wrote A Rebours (1884); transl. as Against the Grain)
  • William S. Burroughs (1914), St. Louis-born experimental novelist
  • Andrew Greeley (1928), novelist, writer on religion and sociology, and Catholic priest, born illinois
  • Elizabeth Swados (1951), U.S. composer and playwright, winner of 1972 Tony
  • Jorn Donner
  • Margaret Millar

6th

  • Berta Hader (1891–1976)
  • Weyman B. Jones (1928)
  • Jerome Wexler (1923)
  • Christopher Marlowe (1564), English poet and dramatist
  • Ugo Foscolo (1778), Italian poet, playwright, journalist, author
  • Kroly Kisfaludy (1788), Hungarian romantic poet
  • Melvin B(eaunorus) Tolson (1898–1966), Missouri native, African American poet, journalist, and dramatist, one-time Poet Laureate of Liberia
  • Louis Nizer (1902), British-born American lawyer, author, and defender of those blacklisted, summary of his book The Implosion Consipracy
  • Pramoedya Ananta Toer

7th

  • Shonto Begay (1954)
  • Charles Dickens (1812–1870)
  • Fred Gipson (1908–1973)
  • Sinclair Lewis, novelist and social critic, winner of 1930 Nobel (7 Feb. 1885 – 10 Jan. 1951)
  • Ann Radcliffe, London-born Gothic novelist (1764)
  • Frederik Paludan-Muller (1809), Danish romantic poet
  • Sir James [Augustus Henry] Murray (1837–1915), Scottish lexicographer, creator of the Oxford English Dictionary
  • Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867–1957), Wisconsin-born children's writer, creator of the "Little House on the Prairie" series
  • Milton Krims (1904), teleplay writer (Outer Limits, Perry Mason) and director
  • Gay Talese (1932), author
  • Jacob Paludan

8th

  • Adrienne Adams (1906–2002)
  • Anne Rockwell (1934)
  • Robert Burton, aka Democritus Junior, English scholar, Anglican clergyman, and writer (1577–1640), who wrote The Anatomy of Melancholy (1621)
  • Samuel Butler (1612–1680), English poet and satirist, who wrote the highly autobiographical and satiric novel The Way of All Flesh (1903)
  • John Ruskin (1819–1900), writer and art critic
  • Jules Verne (1828–1905), French science fiction pioneer, Around the World in 80 Days, etc.
  • Elizabeth Bishop (1911), Massachusetts-born poet, who won a Pulitzer in 1956
  • Kate Chopin (1851–1904), St. Louis, Missouri-born writer of The Awakening
  • John Grisham (1955), Mississippi-based novelist
  • Henry Roth
  • Eila Pennanen

9th

  • Dick Gackenbach (1927)
  • Stephen Roos (1945)
  • Hilda Van Stockum (1908)
  • Frans Michael Franzen (1772), Finnish-Swedish poet, journalist, educator, and bishop
  • George Ade (1866–1944), U.S. journalist, playwright, and humorist
  • Amy Lowell, Massachusetts-born imagist poet and critic (1847);
  • Brendan Behan (1923), Irish author
  • Alice Walker (1944), Georgia-born novelist and essayist, who won the Pulitzer Prize for The Color Purple (1982)
  • Natsume Soseki
  • J.M. Coetzee

10th

  • Franz Brandenberg (1932)
  • Lucy Cousins (1964)
  • Edward Dolan (1924)
  • Stephen Gammell (1943)
  • E. L. Konigsburg (1930)
  • Mark Teague (1963)
  • Sir John Suckling, English poet and dramatist (1609; 12 of Suckling's poems);
  • William Congreve (1670), Restoration writer dramatist and poet, teaching notes on The Way of the World
  • Charles Lamb aka Elia (1775–1834), English poet, essayist, critic, and man of letters, who wrote The Adventures of Ulysses (1808) and the popular children's book Tales from Shakespeare (1807)
  • William Allen White (1868), Kansas editor and 1942 Pulitzer Prize winner
  • Boris Pasternak (1890–1960), Russian novelist and poet
  • Berthold Friedrich Brecht (1898–1956), German playwright and poet, born Eugen, whose major plays include "Mother Courage and Her Children" (1941) and "Galileo" (1938);
  • Roxanne Pulitzer (1951)
  • Henry Roth
  • Tito Colliander

11th

  • Toshi Maruko (1912)
  • James Rice (1934)
  • Jane Yolen (1939)
  • Lydia Maria Child (1802–1880), U.S. author and abolitionist (story "Stand From Under")
  • Roy Fuller (1912), English poet and novelist
  • Sidney Sheldon (1917), Chicago-born novelist, winner of 1947 Academy Award and a 1959 Tony Award
  • Elsa Beskow
  • Maryse Conde

12th

  • Ann Atwood (1913)
  • Judy Blume (1938)
  • Chris Conover (1950)
  • David Small (1945)
  • Jacqueline Woodson (1963)
  • Thomas Campion (1567–1620), English composer, poet, and physician (6 Campion poems)
  • Cotton Mather (1663), American preacher and writer
  • Charles [Robert] Darwin (1809–1882), English naturalist and writer, author of On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (1859)
  • George Meredith, English poet and novelist (1828; Meredith poems);
  • Judy Blume (1938), children's author
  • Andrew Garve

13th

14th

  • Jamake Highwater (1942–2001)
  • Phyllis Root (1949)
  • George Shannon (1952)
  • Paul O. Zelinsky (1953)
  • Domingo Faustino Sarmiento (1811–1888), Argentinian writer
  • Frank Harris (1856), English journalist and writer
  • Israel Zangwill (1864–1926), English Jewish author
  • George Jean Nathan (1882–1958), Indiana-born editor, drama critic, and author, who co-founded the American Mercury magazine in 1924 with H.L. Mencken;
  • A. M[oses] Klein (1909), Russian-born Canadian poet
  • Carl Bernstein (1944), Washington, D.C.-born journalist and author, who with Bob Woodward won a Pulitzer Prize in 1973 for his Watergate coverage and wrote the best-selling All the President's Men (1974)

15th

  • Betty Boegehol
  • Norman Bridwell (1928)
  • Richard Chase (1904–1988)
  • Jan Spivey Gilchrist (1949)
  • Elaine Landau (1948)
  • Doris Orgel (1929)
  • Sax Rohmer, born Arthur Henry Sarsfield Ward (1886–1959), English mystery author, creator of Dr. Fu Manchu
  • Herman Kahn (1922–1983), New Jersey-born writer on thermonuclear war
  • Susan Brownmiller, Brooklyn feminist author (1935; review of Seeing Vietnam);
  • Douglas R. Hofstadter (1945), author of Goedel, Escher, Bach

16th

  • Nancy Ekholm Burkert (1933)
  • Elizabeth K. Cooper (1916)
  • Carol Gorman (1952)
  • [Johann Jakob] Wilhelm Heinse (1746–1803), German novelist and art critic
  • Henry Brooks Adams (1838–1918), grandson of John Quincy Adams, Boston-born historian and writer, who wrote The Education of Henry Adams
  • Octave Mirbeau (1848–1917, also on 16 Feb), French writer
  • Van Wyck Brooks (1886–1963), New Jersey native, critic, biographer, and literary historian, author of the five-volume literary history Makers and Finders, who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1937;
  • Hal Porter (1911), Australian short story writer
  • G[eorge] M[acaulay] Trevelyan (1876–1962), English historian and writer
  • Richard Ford (1944), Mississippi-born novelist and sportswriter, who won a Pulitzer Prize for Independence Day (1995)

17th

  • Dorothy Canfield Fisher (1879–1958)
  • Michael McCurdy (1942)
  • André Norton (1912)
  • Robert Newton Peck (1928)
  • Susan Beth Pfeffer (1948)
  • Virginia Sorensen (1912–1991)
  • Gustavo Adolfo Becquer (1836–1870), Spanish romantic poet and journalist, Becquer's "Rhyme LXXXI-Eternal Love"
  • Samuel Sidney McClure (1857–1949), Irish-American editor and publisher, who organized the first syndicated newspaper in the U.S. (the "McClure Syndicate," 1884);
  • Andrew Barton Paterson (1864–1941), Australian WWI correspondent and light-verse poet, who adapted "Waltzing Matilda", Australia's national song;
  • Dorothy Canfield (1879), U.S. novelist, review of The Bed Quilt and Other Stories
  • Margaret Truman (1924), Missouri-born mystery writer and Harry Truman's daughter;
  • Chaim Potok (1929), Jewish Bronx-born novelist
  • Ruth Rendell (1930), aka Barbara Vine, British mystery writer

18th

  • Sholem Aleichem (1859), Ukraine-born Yiddish author, author of the short stories on which the libretto for "Fiddler on the Roof" was based
  • Nikos Kazantzakis (1883–1957), Greek novelist, journalist, and politician, best known internationally for novels Zorba the Greek (1943) and The Last Temptation of Christ (1951)
  • Wendell Willkie (1892–1944), author and presidential candidate
  • Wallace Stegner (1909–1993), Iowa-born novelist, critic, and 1971 Pulitzer Prize winner, called "the dean of Western writers"
  • Virginia Kahl (1919)
  • Helen Gurley Brown (1922), Arkansas-born editor and writer, who wrote Sex and the Single Girl and edited Cosmopolitan magazine
  • Toni Morrison (1931), born Chloe Anthony Wofford, Ohio-born African American novelist, who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1993 and the Pulitzer in 1987
  • Audre [Geraldine] Lorde (1934–1992), aka Rey Domini, NYC native, African American poet, essayist, novelist, and autobiographer, a prominent feminist and gay rights advocate
  • Barbara Joosse (1949)

19th

  • David Garrick (1717), actor, producer, and writer
  • Élie Ducommun (1833–1906), Swiss writer and pacifist, 1902 Nobel peace prize winner
  • Jose Eustasio Rivera (1889), Colombian poet and novelist
  • Andre Breton (1896–1966), French surrealist founder and theorist, writer, co-founder with Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, and David Hare the American surrealist magazine VVV
  • Kay Boyle (1902–1992), Minnesota-born novelist
  • Louis Slobodkin (1903–1975)
  • Carson McCullers (1917–1967) , née Lula Carson Smith, Georgia-born novelist
  • Jill Krementz (1940)
  • Amy Tan (1952), California-born Chinese-American novelist, whose first book was The Joy Luck Club

20th

  • Pieter Cornelis Boutens (1870–1943), Dutch mystic poet
  • Shiga Naoya (1883–1971), Japanese novelist
  • [Edward] Hesketh [Gibbons] Pearson (1887–1964), English biographer, actor, director, and playwright
  • Georges Bernanos (1888–1948), French novelist
  • Russel Crouse (1893–1966), journalist and playwright, longtime play writing and producing partner of Howard Lindsay, with whom he won the 1946 Pulitzer Prize in drama for "State of the Union"
  • Ophelia Egypt (1903)
  • Rosemary Harris (1923)
  • Alex La Guma (1925–1985), South African novelist
  • Mary Blount Christian (1933)

21st

  • Jose Zorrilla y Moral (1817–1893), Spanish poet and dramatist
  • Charles Scribner (1821), publisher
  • Anaïs Nin (1903–1977), novelist and diarist
  • W[ystan] H[ugh] Auden, U.S. poet, winner of 1948 Pulitzer (1907-1973)
  • Erma Bombeck (1927–1996), Ohio-born humorist and syndicated columnist
  • Virginia Driving Hawk Sneve (1934)
  • Barbara [Charline] Jordan (1936–1996), Texas politician and autobiographer
  • Patricia Hermes (1936)
  • Jim Aylesworth (1943)

22nd

  • Roma Gans (1894)
  • Harry Kullman (1919–1982)
  • James Russell Lowell (1819; Abraham Lincoln), poet, critic, and abolitionist
  • Jules Renard (1864–1910), French writer
  • Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892–1950), Maine poet and Pulitzer prize winner
  • Giorgios Seferis (1900–1971), Greek poet and 1963 Nobelist
  • Sean O'Faolain, aka John Francis Whelan, (1900–1991), Irish short story writer
  • Morley Callaghan (1903; photo of Callaghan), Canadian author
  • Jane [Auer] Bowles (1917–1974), NYC-born short story writer and novelist
  • Edward St. John Gorey (1925–2000), Chicago-born author and artist of the macabre
  • Ishmael [Scott] Reed (1938), Tennessee native (New York-raised) novelist, essayist, poet, and editor, known for his satiric commentaries and parodies

23rd

  • C(arole). S. Adler (1932)
  • Eric Kastner (1899–1974)
  • Walter Wick (1953)
  • Samuel Pepys (1633–1703), English diarist
  • W[illiam] E[dward] B[urghardt] Du Bois (1868–1963), Massachusetts-born Ghanaian writer, The Souls of Black Folk
  • Erich Kastner (1899–1974), German children's author
  • William L. Shirer (1904–1993), Chicago-born historian and radio journalist, author of The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich
  • Haki R. Madhubuti (1942) born Don Luther Lee, Arkansas native, African American poet, essayist, critic, and publisher, a leading voice in the black arts movement

24th

  • Mary Ellen Chase (1887–1973), Maine educator and author
  • Uri Orlev (1931)
  • Wilhelm Carl Grimm (1786–1859), librarian, literary historian, and with his brother, Jacob Grimm, Grimm's Fairy Tales collaborator
  • George Moore (1852–1933), Irish novelist;
  • Temple Bailey (1869-1953), American novelist
  • Juliusz Kaden-Bandrowski (1885–1944), Polish novelist
  • August William Derleth (1909–1971), Wisconsin writer

25th

  • Helen Brodie Bannerman (1862–1946)
  • Frank Bonham (1914)
  • True Kelley (1946)
  • Iain Lawrence
  • Cynthia Voigt (1942)
  • Carlo Goldoni (1707–1793), Italian dramatist
  • George Samuel Schuyler (1895–1977), Rhode Island native, African American novelist, journalist, and reporter, best known for his satirical novel Black No More; Being An Account of the Strange and Wonderful Workings of Science in the Land of the Free (1931)
  • Frank Slaughter (1908), author
  • Anthony Burgess (1917–1993), essayist, novelist, and musician, author of A Clockwork Orange;
  • Shiva[dhar] Srinivasa Naipaul (1945–1985), Trinidad-born journalist, novelist and travel writer

26th

  • Sharon Bell Mathis (1937)
  • Colby Rodowsky (1932)
  • Jean St. George (1931)
  • Bernard Wolf (1930)
  • Miriam Young (1913)
  • Victor [Marie] Hugo (1802–1885), French novelist, playwright, and Romantic poet, exiled to the Channel Islands during Napoleon's reign, author of Les Miserables (1862)
  • John George Nicolay (1832–1901), U.S. author, Lincoln's private secretary and biographer
  • Jean Vercors (1902) aka Marcel Bruller, French writer
  • Theodore Sturgeon born Edward Hamilton Waldo (1918–1985), science fiction writer

27th

  • Florence Parry Heide (1919)
  • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807–1882)
  • Laura Richards (1850–1943)
  • Uri Shulevitz (1935)
  • Mary Frances Shura (1923)
  • Angelina Weld Grimke (1880–1958), Boston-born African American dramatist and poet
  • John Steinbeck, Calif. novelist and 1962 Nobelist (1902–1968)
  • James Thomas Farrell (1904–1979), Chicago native, novelist and short story writer
  • Peter DeVries (1910), Chicago author
  • Lawrence Durrell (1912–1990), India-born British novelist, authored The Alexandria Quartet
  • Irwin Shaw (1913–1984), U.S. novelist

28th

  • Megan McDonald (1959)
  • Donna Jo Napoli (1948)
  • Michel de Montaigne (1533), French essayist
  • John Tenniel (1820–1914), English cartoonist and Alice-in-Wonderland illustrator
  • Vyacheslav Ivanov (1866; old style birthdate is 16 Feb.–1949), Russian poet in the Symbolist movement, linguist, and literary scholar
  • Maurice Renard (1875-1939), French science fiction writer
  • Ben Hecht (1894), NYC-born, Wisconsin-raised screenwriter, director, producer, playwright, novelist, and journalist
  • Stephen Spender (1909–1995), English poet and critic
  • Don[ald] Coldsmith (1926), Kansas native, physician, syndicated newspaper columnist, and historical novelist

29th

  • David Raymond Collins (1940)
  • Patricia McKillip (1948)
  • Susan L. Roth (1944)